Notices
Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: Our cells

  1. #1 Our cells 
    Forum Sophomore
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    115
    Are our individual and distinct body cells considered as unicellular organisms?


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Forum Junior
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    286
    No, because even though you find unicellular organisms such as bacteria living in a colony, they are each capable of carrying out all the processes necessary to survive. Our body cells on the other hand, require each other to survive, kind of like a child being dependent on its parents to survive and therefore not considered 'independent' if that makes sense.


    Last edited by Curiosity; August 19th, 2014 at 09:25 PM.
    I can never know I'm right, but I can know that I'm wrong.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Forum Sophomore
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    115
    Kay thanks for the corroboration.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Forum Professor Zwolver's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    1,667
    Quote Originally Posted by Curiosity View Post
    No, because even though you find unicellular organisms such as bacteria living in a colony, they are each capable of carrying out all the processes necessarily to survive. Our body cells on the other hand, require each other to survive, kind of like a child being dependent on its parents to survive and therefore not considered 'independent' if that makes sense.
    So a bacterium who is only able to survive in symbiosis with another bacterium or archea is not an individual organism? Your designation is incomplete, and slightly off.

    It is not a unicellular organism because not all of its functions can be active. A stemcell could be considered a unicellular organism in that regard, however, not for long. Even a stem cell still can not access all its functions without forming specialist cells, which in turn cannot use all their genes.

    In my opinion this is a much better distinguished this way.
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Forum Junior
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    286
    Nice point. So, we're going to go with a cell that expresses all its functional genes?
    I can never know I'm right, but I can know that I'm wrong.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    2,408
    Pluripotent stem cells
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7  
    Forum Professor Zwolver's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    1,667
    Quote Originally Posted by dan hunter View Post
    Pluripotent stem cells
    A pluripotent stem cell, as i told needs to distinguish to use a some of their genes. There has never been a stem cell that could function as a brain cell. The genes were not yet locked away, but it still needed to differentiate to have the correct proteins to use their other genes properly, which ceases it to be a stem cell.
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #8  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    2,408
    Quote Originally Posted by Zwolver View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by dan hunter View Post
    Pluripotent stem cells
    A pluripotent stem cell, as i told needs to distinguish to use a some of their genes. There has never been a stem cell that could function as a brain cell. The genes were not yet locked away, but it still needed to differentiate to have the correct proteins to use their other genes properly, which ceases it to be a stem cell.
    Not quite my meaning.
    Stem cells can be cultured in isolation.
    Another possible human cell to consider as a unicellular organism is the macrophages from the blood. I am uncertain about their ability to reproduce in culture but they do have the independent movement thing going for them.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #9  
    Forum Professor Zwolver's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    1,667
    Quote Originally Posted by dan hunter View Post
    Not quite my meaning.
    Stem cells can be cultured in isolation.
    Another possible human cell to consider as a unicellular organism is the macrophages from the blood. I am uncertain about their ability to reproduce in culture but they do have the independent movement thing going for them.
    But they are specialized. And don't have access to most of their genes anymore. A macrophage can't even divide but lives several months. Seems to me their genes for selfreplication are switched off. So i wouldn't call them a unicellular organism. I would propose the memory B or T cell. As these can change back to a B or T cell, can divide, and live for several years. But still, most of their specialized genes are locked away.
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
    Reply With Quote  
     

  11. #10  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    2,408
    Quote Originally Posted by Zwolver View Post
    Seems to me their genes for selfreplication are switched off. So i wouldn't call them a unicellular organism. I would propose the memory B or T cell. As these can change back to a B or T cell, can divide, and live for several years. But still, most of their specialized genes are locked away.
    Liver cultures seem to have long lives. What about them?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  12. #11  
    Forum Professor Zwolver's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    1,667
    I believe the same applies to the liver cultures than the B or T memory cells.
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
    Reply With Quote  
     

  13. #12  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    2,408
    That exhausts my ideas about what cells might be able to live outside of a body.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  14. #13  
    Forum Junior AndresKiani's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    252
    Our somatic cells are not living systems.. Our cells cannot live once we die, when we die our cells also die. That's just my interpretation. Biochemically we can say that our cells don't have the complete functions and proteins to live as a self sufficient unicellular organism, without the complete living system (the whole organism).

    Again, my interpretation.. I've only taken like 4 Biology courses.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  15. #14  
    Forum Junior AndresKiani's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    252
    I guess its like saying.. our proteins are alive because they are highly dynamic instances of matter. However, the emergent property of life does not emerge at our proteomic level, nor does it at the somatic cellular level. The emergent property of life appears with the full human organism.

    However, the property of life emerges in bacterium unicellular and even yeast (unicellular eukaryotic cells)
    Reply With Quote  
     

  16. #15  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    4,138
    Quote Originally Posted by AndresKiani View Post
    I guess its like saying.. our proteins are alive because they are highly dynamic instances of matter. However, the emergent property of life does not emerge at our proteomic level, nor does it at the somatic cellular level. The emergent property of life appears with the full human organism.

    However, the property of life emerges in bacterium unicellular and even yeast (unicellular eukaryotic cells)
    Explain the phrase "emergent property of life" please?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  17. #16  
    Forum Junior AndresKiani's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    252
    Quote Originally Posted by Robittybob1 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by AndresKiani View Post
    I guess its like saying.. our proteins are alive because they are highly dynamic instances of matter. However, the emergent property of life does not emerge at our proteomic level, nor does it at the somatic cellular level. The emergent property of life appears with the full human organism.

    However, the property of life emerges in bacterium unicellular and even yeast (unicellular eukaryotic cells)
    Explain the phrase "emergent property of life" please?
    I'm not really a biologist or interested in much of biology, as I am chemistry, thus I will explain as such..

    The chemical system that is our somatic cells, do not express the properties of a living system. A living system "emerges" at a much complete level of organization (the organism, in this case a human).
    Reply With Quote  
     

Similar Threads

  1. How have we come to know what cells need?
    By noSkillz in forum Biology
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: April 4th, 2010, 09:00 PM
  2. Cells??
    By juantonwan in forum Biology
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: March 8th, 2010, 04:13 PM
  3. Cells
    By blacknamed in forum Biology
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: September 23rd, 2009, 01:49 AM
  4. Replies: 4
    Last Post: August 26th, 2008, 07:54 PM
  5. Replies: 1
    Last Post: July 24th, 2008, 01:02 PM
Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •