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Thread: Cholecystitis

  1. #1 Cholecystitis 
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    I'm studying Cholecystitis at the moment and one thing I don't understand is, if the cyctic duct is blocked with a gallstone, how can bile accumulate in the gallbladder and cause increased pressure?


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      Quote Originally Posted by walker8476 View Post
      I'm studying Cholecystitis at the moment and one thing I don't understand is, if the cyctic duct is blocked with a gallstone, how can bile accumulate in the gallbladder and cause increased pressure?
      The duct you are talking about is the one that drains the gall bladder to the small intestine. The bile is produced by cells in the liver and are collected in bile ducts leading to the gall bladder. So the production of bile is not stopped in these cases.
      Cattle have gall stones too.


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      Quote Originally Posted by Robittybob1 View Post
      Quote Originally Posted by walker8476 View Post
      I'm studying Cholecystitis at the moment and one thing I don't understand is, if the cyctic duct is blocked with a gallstone, how can bile accumulate in the gallbladder and cause increased pressure?
      The duct you are talking about is the one that drains the gall bladder to the small intestine. The bile is produced by cells in the liver and are collected in bile ducts leading to the gall bladder. So the production of bile is not stopped in these cases.
      Cattle have gall stones too.

      I'm a bit confused because what I have read is that the left and right hepatic ducts carry bile to the gallbladder:

      "Intrahepatic bile ducts in the left lobe of the liver drain into the left hepatic duct, and the bile ducts in the liver's right lobe, drain into the right hepatic duct. The common hepatic duct is formed when these two hepatic ducts converge to form one larger duct. This converged hepatic duct then joins the cystic duct, which carries bile to and from the gallbladder"
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      Quote Originally Posted by walker8476 View Post
      Quote Originally Posted by Robittybob1 View Post
      Quote Originally Posted by walker8476 View Post
      I'm studying Cholecystitis at the moment and one thing I don't understand is, if the cyctic duct is blocked with a gallstone, how can bile accumulate in the gallbladder and cause increased pressure?
      The duct you are talking about is the one that drains the gall bladder to the small intestine. The bile is produced by cells in the liver and are collected in bile ducts leading to the gall bladder. So the production of bile is not stopped in these cases.
      Cattle have gall stones too.


      I'm a bit confused because what I have read is that the left and right hepatic ducts carry bile to the gallbladder:

      "Intrahepatic bile ducts in the left lobe of the liver drain into the left hepatic duct, and the bile ducts in the liver's right lobe, drain into the right hepatic duct. The common hepatic duct is formed when these two hepatic ducts converge to form one larger duct. This converged hepatic duct then joins the cystic duct, which carries bile to and from the gallbladder"
      Well that could be the description of the human setup. So what is confusing? The production of bile is continuous but the secretion of it into the SI would be correlated to times of digestion (e.g. after eating, particularly certain foods) so the gall bladder is used to store the bile between meals.
      I think you are just missing the idea of interrupted flow of bile into the SI.

      "the left and right hepatic ducts carry bile to the gallbladder" I think you'll find that the junction of the various organs is like a 4 way intersection.
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      I'm confused as to how the bile reaches the gallbladder. What I have read is that the bile is produced by liver cells and is collected by the left and right hepatic ducts. The bile then flows down the common hepatic duct then the cystic duct and into the gallbladder. If a gallstone blocks the cystic duct as in acute cholecystisis, why does the bile accumulate in the gallbladder and increase pressure? Shouldn't the blockage stop bile entering the gallbladder as well?
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      Quote Originally Posted by walker8476 View Post
      I'm confused as to how the bile reaches the gallbladder. What I have read is that the bile is produced by liver cells and is collected by the left and right hepatic ducts. The bile then flows down the common hepatic duct then the cystic duct and into the gallbladder. If a gallstone blocks the cystic duct as in acute cholecystisis, why does the bile accumulate in the gallbladder and increase pressure? Shouldn't the blockage stop bile entering the gallbladder as well?
      If the blockage was so that the gall bladder couldn't fill up in the first place you might not notice any illness. I've seen gall bladders completely filled with stones so there was no way any more bile could fill them up. That would happen in humans too, so what is the symptoms of that? Continuous leakage of bile into the intestines, that might cause a loose bowel motion. The left and right hepatic ducts also have the capacity to inflate and enlarge over time. Goats seem to be prone to liver fluke infection and I've seen cases where those ducts had the capacity of around 100 ml filled with dozens of flukes. (The liver then looks like it has a bad dose of varicose veins.)
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      Have you looked at the physical anatomy? The gall bladder is essentially a, balloon like, reservoir attached to the side of the cystic duct. It fills due to the constant secretion of bile and empties when it is stimulated by the presence of fats in the small intestine. Stones crystize in the bile when it is at rest in the bladder and block the neck of the bladder when it attempts to empty. A large stone can block the cystic duct "down stream" of the junction of the neck of the gall bladder and the cystic duct this will cause severe pain as the pressure in the gall badder rises and possibly diarrhea as the body attempts to rid itself of the blockage.
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      Quote Originally Posted by Sealeaf View Post
      .... A large stone can block the cystic duct "down stream" of the junction of the neck of the gall bladder and the cystic duct this will cause severe pain as the pressure in the gall badder rises and possibly diarrhea as the body attempts to rid itself of the blockage.
      Are you sure about the diarrhoea?
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