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Thread: Pheomelanin

  1. #1 Pheomelanin 
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    Hello all.I would like to know what kind of drug/substance can increase pheomelanin levels in the body?Thanks!
    (I wasn't sure where to post this,biology,chemistry or health/medicine,finally it ended up here,hope tis' the right section)


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    I may be wrong but I dont think there is anything - why do you want to do it? to lighten your skin?


    "And we should consider every day lost on which we have not danced at least once. And we should call every truth false which was not accompanied by at least one laugh" Nietzsche.
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    A hormone that could promote the production of pheomelanin seems the only bet. Seems to be an article about this, but my access is restricted to Chemistry/Geology/Technology articles.

    Nature 445, 843-850 (22 February 2007) | doi:10.1038/nature05660; Published online 21 February 2007
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
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    Quote Originally Posted by LuciDreaming View Post
    I may be wrong but I dont think there is anything - why do you want to do it? to lighten your skin?
    Being a white person,no,it wouldn't really make a change.It is more to this than skin colour.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zwolver View Post
    A hormone that could promote the production of pheomelanin seems the only bet. Seems to be an article about this, but my access is restricted to Chemistry/Geology/Technology articles.

    Nature 445, 843-850 (22 February 2007) | doi:10.1038/nature05660; Published online 21 February 2007
    Could you direct me to this article,or give any kind of clues/links about this topic,it would mean a great deal to me,I would appreciate any help.Thanks!
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    Melanocytes are phenotypically prominent but histologically inconspicuous skin cells. They are responsible for the pigmentation of skin and hair, and thereby contribute to the appearance of skin and provide protection from damage by ultraviolet radiation. Pigmentation mutants in various species are highly informative about basic genetic and developmental pathways, and provide important clues to the processes of photoprotection, cancer predisposition and even human evolution. Skin is the most common site of cancer in humans. Continued understanding of melanocyte contributions to skin biology will hopefully provide new opportunities for the prevention and treatment of skin diseases.

    Melanocytes can absorb ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and survive considerable genotoxic stress. The skin is the main barrier to the external environment, and relies on melanocytes to provide, among other things, photoprotection and thermoregulation by producing melanin. The degree of pigment production manifests as skin 'phototype' (skin colour and ease of tanning)1 and is the most useful predictor of human skin cancer risk in the general population.
    The colours we see in feathers, fur and skin are largely determined by melanocytes. In addition to carotenoids and haemoglobin, melanin is the main contributor to pigmentation. There are two main types of melanin — red/yellow pheomelanin and brown/black eumelanin. Melanin-containing granules are known as melanosomes and are exported from melanocytes to adjacent keratinocytes, where most pigment is found. As a result, pigmentation differences can arise from variation in the number, size, composition and distribution of melanosomes, whereas melanocyte numbers typically remain relatively constant (Fig. 1a, b).
    Figure 1: Vertebrate pigmentation.

    a, Haematoxylin and eosin stain of normal human skin. Cells of the upper layer of the epidermis (keratinocytes) contain large nuclei, which stain blue, and the dermis appears pink as a result of staining of its abundant protein, collagen (muscle and nerve fibres may also stain pink). Normal melanocytes (arrows) have smaller nuclei and inconspicuous cytoplasm compared with the surrounding keratinocytes. Melanocytes are typically located in the basal layer of the epidermis, at the junction with the dermis. Differences in human pigmentation reflect variations in the number of melanosomes in keratinocytes and different melanin granule phenotype (depending on the eumelanin/pheomelanin ratio) rather than variation in the number of melanocytes. (Image courtesy of S. R. Granter, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Massachusetts.) b, Immunohistochemical analysis of the same human tissue as shown in a identifies melanocytes by using the immunohistochemical marker D5, which stains the MITF transcription factor located in their nuclei (Image courtesy of S. R. Granter.) c, Medaka goldfish are valuable in pigmentation studies. The wild type, B/B, is the lower of the two. Compared with this, b/b (top), which is bred for its golden colour, lacks melanin except in the eyes. The b locus is highly homologous with the locus for oculocutaneous albinism 4 (OCA-4) in humans, MATP or AIM1. MATP seems to be involved in melanocyte differentiation and melanosome formation. (Image reprinted, with permission, from ref. 82.) d, The yellow pigmentation in golden labradors is recessively inherited and results from an amino-acid substitution in Mc1r that produces a premature stop codon6. The same pigmentation can be seen in mice (Mc1re/e), horses and cats with hypomorphic Mc1rvariants. (Image courtesy of Terra Nova.) e, Furred animals such as mice lack epidermal melanocytes (except in non-hair-bearing sites such as the ear, nose and paws). f, Polar bears have hollow unpigmented fur to blend in with the environment but, unlike other furred animals, have a high density of epidermal melanocytes, which aid in heat retention and produce black skin most notable in non-furred areas. (Image courtesy of First People.)
    High resolution image and legend (48K)

    Mutations affecting pigmentation have been identified in many species because they are easily recognizable. Such mutants can be categorized into four groups: hypopigmentation and hyperpigmentation, with or without altered melanocyte number. These phenotypic distinctions have afforded the opportunity to easily classify genes affecting the melanocyte lineage, with respect to viability or differentiation (or both). Some of these mutants function in non-cell-autonomous manner, thereby further revealing cell–cell communication pathways of physiological importance. Collectively, pigmentation or coat colour mutants have become an invaluable resource for the analysis of melanocyte differentiation and as a model for the broader fields of neural-crest development and mammalian genetics.
    There are two discrete melanocytic populations in hair follicles: melanocyte stem cells and their differentiated progeny, which reside in geographically distinct locations to comprise a follicular unit that is tightly linked to the surrounding keratinocyte population. Hair follicle melanocyte stem cells have important roles in both normal hair pigmentation and senile hair greying, and specific genetic defects have shed further light on the survival properties of this cell population.
    This review summarizes how pigmentation is regulated at the molecular level and how the tanning response provides protection against damage and skin cancer. We discuss recent advances in our knowledge of the genes involved in these processes and how they affect skin and hair colour. We also cover the developmental origin of melanocytes and how they are maintained by melanoblast stem cells, whose eventual depletion may contribute to hair greying. Finally, we detail some questions that research into melanocyte biology hopes to address in the future.


    Copied a piece from Nature 445, 843-850 (22 February 2007) | doi:10.1038/nature05660; Published online 21 February 2007

    And here is an image from the same article, may be usefull


    Last edited by Zwolver; April 25th, 2014 at 10:04 AM.
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
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  8. #7 Thank you! 
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zwolver View Post
    Melanocytes are phenotypically prominent but histologically inconspicuous skin cells. They are responsible for the pigmentation of skin and hair, and thereby contribute to the appearance of skin and provide protection from damage by ultraviolet radiation. Pigmentation mutants in various species are highly informative about basic genetic and developmental pathways, and provide important clues to the processes of photoprotection, cancer predisposition and even human evolution. Skin is the most common site of cancer in humans. Continued understanding of melanocyte contributions to skin biology will hopefully provide new opportunities for the prevention and treatment of skin diseases.

    Melanocytes can absorb ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and survive considerable genotoxic stress. The skin is the main barrier to the external environment, and relies on melanocytes to provide, among other things, photoprotection and thermoregulation by producing melanin. The degree of pigment production manifests as skin 'phototype' (skin colour and ease of tanning)1 and is the most useful predictor of human skin cancer risk in the general population.
    The colours we see in feathers, fur and skin are largely determined by melanocytes. In addition to carotenoids and haemoglobin, melanin is the main contributor to pigmentation. There are two main types of melanin ó red/yellow pheomelanin and brown/black eumelanin. Melanin-containing granules are known as melanosomes and are exported from melanocytes to adjacent keratinocytes, where most pigment is found. As a result, pigmentation differences can arise from variation in the number, size, composition and distribution of melanosomes, whereas melanocyte numbers typically remain relatively constant (Fig. 1a, b).
    Figure 1: Vertebrate pigmentation.

    a, Haematoxylin and eosin stain of normal human skin. Cells of the upper layer of the epidermis (keratinocytes) contain large nuclei, which stain blue, and the dermis appears pink as a result of staining of its abundant protein, collagen (muscle and nerve fibres may also stain pink). Normal melanocytes (arrows) have smaller nuclei and inconspicuous cytoplasm compared with the surrounding keratinocytes. Melanocytes are typically located in the basal layer of the epidermis, at the junction with the dermis. Differences in human pigmentation reflect variations in the number of melanosomes in keratinocytes and different melanin granule phenotype (depending on the eumelanin/pheomelanin ratio) rather than variation in the number of melanocytes. (Image courtesy of S. R. Granter, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Massachusetts.) b, Immunohistochemical analysis of the same human tissue as shown in a identifies melanocytes by using the immunohistochemical marker D5, which stains the MITF transcription factor located in their nuclei (Image courtesy of S. R. Granter.) c, Medaka goldfish are valuable in pigmentation studies. The wild type, B/B, is the lower of the two. Compared with this, b/b (top), which is bred for its golden colour, lacks melanin except in the eyes. The b locus is highly homologous with the locus for oculocutaneous albinism 4 (OCA-4) in humans, MATP or AIM1. MATP seems to be involved in melanocyte differentiation and melanosome formation. (Image reprinted, with permission, from ref. 82.) d, The yellow pigmentation in golden labradors is recessively inherited and results from an amino-acid substitution in Mc1r that produces a premature stop codon6. The same pigmentation can be seen in mice (Mc1re/e), horses and cats with hypomorphic Mc1rvariants. (Image courtesy of Terra Nova.) e, Furred animals such as mice lack epidermal melanocytes (except in non-hair-bearing sites such as the ear, nose and paws). f, Polar bears have hollow unpigmented fur to blend in with the environment but, unlike other furred animals, have a high density of epidermal melanocytes, which aid in heat retention and produce black skin most notable in non-furred areas. (Image courtesy of First People.)
    High resolution image and legend (48K)

    Mutations affecting pigmentation have been identified in many species because they are easily recognizable. Such mutants can be categorized into four groups: hypopigmentation and hyperpigmentation, with or without altered melanocyte number. These phenotypic distinctions have afforded the opportunity to easily classify genes affecting the melanocyte lineage, with respect to viability or differentiation (or both). Some of these mutants function in non-cell-autonomous manner, thereby further revealing cellĖcell communication pathways of physiological importance. Collectively, pigmentation or coat colour mutants have become an invaluable resource for the analysis of melanocyte differentiation and as a model for the broader fields of neural-crest development and mammalian genetics.
    There are two discrete melanocytic populations in hair follicles: melanocyte stem cells and their differentiated progeny, which reside in geographically distinct locations to comprise a follicular unit that is tightly linked to the surrounding keratinocyte population. Hair follicle melanocyte stem cells have important roles in both normal hair pigmentation and senile hair greying, and specific genetic defects have shed further light on the survival properties of this cell population.
    This review summarizes how pigmentation is regulated at the molecular level and how the tanning response provides protection against damage and skin cancer. We discuss recent advances in our knowledge of the genes involved in these processes and how they affect skin and hair colour. We also cover the developmental origin of melanocytes and how they are maintained by melanoblast stem cells, whose eventual depletion may contribute to hair greying. Finally, we detail some questions that research into melanocyte biology hopes to address in the future.


    Copied a piece from Nature 445, 843-850 (22 February 2007) | doi:10.1038/nature05660; Published online 21 February 2007

    And here is an image from the same article, may be usefull


    Thanks for taking the time,appreciate it mate!It's a great article,really.The problem is,it's a tad complicated,for me at least,I don't study biology so maybe that's the reason I didn't get it how an individual can artificially or naturally increase his pheomelanin levels.So,if anybody can explain to me,a tad more practically,like take x y drug to increase pheomelanin levels,or take w z hormone or take this or that,to increase those damn levels,it will be really appreciated.I'm sure that some kind of hormone or druq to do that exists,maybe it's not safe but I don't really care.Any suggestions are welcome mates.Have a nice day!
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    There is nothing in that article that shows what substance will increase pheomelanin. It shows how melanin is regulated at the molecular level. Maybe if you explain what you need it for someone may be able to suggest an alternative - sometimes in the body its not a simple relationship between substances.
    "And we should consider every day lost on which we have not danced at least once. And we should call every truth false which was not accompanied by at least one laugh" Nietzsche.
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    A regulation is a way to increase the substance.
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
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  11. #10 Hey 
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    Quote Originally Posted by LuciDreaming View Post
    There is nothing in that article that shows what substance will increase pheomelanin. It shows how melanin is regulated at the molecular level. Maybe if you explain what you need it for someone may be able to suggest an alternative - sometimes in the body its not a simple relationship between substances.
    Hey Luci,thanks for your answer!
    Well,what kind of details you need?An individual(male) wants to increase his pheomelanin levels as much as physically possible,his body produces more eumelanin(brown eyes,dark brown hair) but he is European,Fitzpatrick II skin type.So he's NOT an african or asian just trying to whiten his skin,for that purpose there are things like hydroquinone etc.If you need more details,just let me know.Almost forgot:he wants to inhibit/stop his eumelanin production as much as possible too,or at least tip the melanin production ratio in favor of the pheomelanin.
    @Zwolver: what kind of regulation?
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    What I meant is what are you trying to achieve by changing it? I dont think you can change it to be honest - the ratio of eumelanin to pheomelanin is genetically determined
    "And we should consider every day lost on which we have not danced at least once. And we should call every truth false which was not accompanied by at least one laugh" Nietzsche.
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    Quote Originally Posted by LuciDreaming View Post
    What I meant is what are you trying to achieve by changing it? I dont think you can change it to be honest - the ratio of eumelanin to pheomelanin is genetically determined
    I'm not really pleased by my appearance,and I want lighter hair,blue eyes and maybe even lighter skin,you know,things which are characteristic for higher pheomelanin levels.I know it's very weird,but that's my obsession,lol.I made some research,and THEORETICALLY(I think no one done it) higher pheomelanin levels could do those things.If there is nothing to increase it,what regulates pheomelanin?I mean what determines ones melanin ratios,besides "genetics"?What hormone or whatnot is responsible for a person having more pheomelanin than eumelanin?I mean,it is an inherited,"genetical" thing,I understand,but something influences,determines it,it isn't just magically there from the beginning of time and goes on and on in some peoples genes.I'm not sure you understand where I am getting,I'm bad at explaining this.
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    Quote Originally Posted by anonymous74 View Post
    @Zwolver: what kind of regulation?
    Introduce supplements for the ET3 and SCF receptors.. Modify cAMP concentrations, etc.
    anonymous74 likes this.
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
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    Quote Originally Posted by anonymous74 View Post
    Hello all.I would like to know what kind of drug/substance can increase pheomelanin levels in the body?Thanks!
    (I wasn't sure where to post this,biology,chemistry or health/medicine,finally it ended up here,hope tis' the right section)

    Increasing the amount in skin is easy. Expose yourself to UV light, more will be produced and you get tan.
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    Quote Originally Posted by delbertdeleo View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by anonymous74 View Post
    Hello all.I would like to know what kind of drug/substance can increase pheomelanin levels in the body?Thanks!
    (I wasn't sure where to post this,biology,chemistry or health/medicine,finally it ended up here,hope tis' the right section)

    Increasing the amount in skin is easy. Expose yourself to UV light, more will be produced and you get tan.
    That has adverse effects. And it barely produces any pheomelanin. As you know, this chromophore doesn't stop UV light, so why would the body produce this to stop that. However, a ginger does get freckles if he sunbathes (right before he incinerates himself with the sunlight).

    I think we want a chemical components that has the production of pheomelanin as the main effect.
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zwolver View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by delbertdeleo View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by anonymous74 View Post
    Hello all.I would like to know what kind of drug/substance can increase pheomelanin levels in the body?Thanks!
    (I wasn't sure where to post this,biology,chemistry or health/medicine,finally it ended up here,hope tis' the right section)

    Increasing the amount in skin is easy. Expose yourself to UV light, more will be produced and you get tan.
    That has adverse effects. And it barely produces any pheomelanin. As you know, this chromophore doesn't stop UV light, so why would the body produce this to stop that. However, a ginger does get freckles if he sunbathes (right before he incinerates himself with the sunlight).

    I think we want a chemical components that has the production of pheomelanin as the main effect.
    What are supplements for ET3 and SCF receptors?And how can cAMP concentrations be modified?I googled these,but nothing really came up,but then again when I googled "increase pheomelanin" nothing came up either.
    Yes,I was thinking of something chemical,or medical to increase pheomelanin but ANY suggestion is welcome.I might try the exposure to UV light,but I thought that sunlight,and in generally any kind of light will increase eumelanin more then pheomelanin,that's why African people are more black(er)=>more sun in Africa=>more eumelanin production,adn the opposite is present in Northern Europe;little sun=>more pheomelanin=>fair skin blonde hair etc.
    So,the only solution would be with the ET3 and SCF receptors?And tweaking the cAMP concentrations,right?I hope that you can elaborate a little bit on it,when you have the time Zwolver,I would really appreciate it.Thanks man!
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    Quote Originally Posted by anonymous74 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Zwolver View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by delbertdeleo View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by anonymous74 View Post
    Hello all.I would like to know what kind of drug/substance can increase pheomelanin levels in the body?Thanks!
    (I wasn't sure where to post this,biology,chemistry or health/medicine,finally it ended up here,hope tis' the right section)

    Increasing the amount in skin is easy. Expose yourself to UV light, more will be produced and you get tan.
    That has adverse effects. And it barely produces any pheomelanin. As you know, this chromophore doesn't stop UV light, so why would the body produce this to stop that. However, a ginger does get freckles if he sunbathes (right before he incinerates himself with the sunlight).

    I think we want a chemical components that has the production of pheomelanin as the main effect.
    What are supplements for ET3 and SCF receptors?And how can cAMP concentrations be modified?I googled these,but nothing really came up,but then again when I googled "increase pheomelanin" nothing came up either.
    Yes,I was thinking of something chemical,or medical to increase pheomelanin but ANY suggestion is welcome.I might try the exposure to UV light,but I thought that sunlight,and in generally any kind of light will increase eumelanin more then pheomelanin,that's why African people are more black(er)=>more sun in Africa=>more eumelanin production,adn the opposite is present in Northern Europe;little sun=>more pheomelanin=>fair skin blonde hair etc.
    So,the only solution would be with the ET3 and SCF receptors?And tweaking the cAMP concentrations,right?I hope that you can elaborate a little bit on it,when you have the time Zwolver,I would really appreciate it.Thanks man!
    ET3 receptors are an endothelin peptide or peptide chain that can detect exert mitogenic or vasoactive effects.

    SCF receptor is a stemcell factor that regulates growth, and metabolism.

    cAMP could be increased by gel, or by simply depleting nutriŽnts in the skin. Decreasing blood pressure on those places, etc.
    anonymous74 likes this.
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zwolver View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by anonymous74 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Zwolver View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by delbertdeleo View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by anonymous74 View Post
    Hello all.I would like to know what kind of drug/substance can increase pheomelanin levels in the body?Thanks!
    (I wasn't sure where to post this,biology,chemistry or health/medicine,finally it ended up here,hope tis' the right section)

    Increasing the amount in skin is easy. Expose yourself to UV light, more will be produced and you get tan.

    That has adverse effects. And it barely produces any pheomelanin. As you know, this chromophore doesn't stop UV light, so why would the body produce this to stop that. However, a ginger does get freckles if he sunbathes (right before he incinerates himself with the sunlight).

    I think we want a chemical components that has the production of pheomelanin as the main effect.
    What are supplements for ET3 and SCF receptors?And how can cAMP concentrations be modified?I googled these,but nothing really came up,but then again when I googled "increase pheomelanin" nothing came up either.
    Yes,I was thinking of something chemical,or medical to increase pheomelanin but ANY suggestion is welcome.I might try the exposure to UV light,but I thought that sunlight,and in generally any kind of light will increase eumelanin more then pheomelanin,that's why African people are more black(er)=>more sun in Africa=>more eumelanin production,adn the opposite is present in Northern Europe;little sun=>more pheomelanin=>fair skin blonde hair etc.
    So,the only solution would be with the ET3 and SCF receptors?And tweaking the cAMP concentrations,right?I hope that you can elaborate a little bit on it,when you have the time Zwolver,I would really appreciate it.Thanks man!
    ET3 receptors are an endothelin peptide or peptide chain that can detect exert mitogenic or vasoactive effects.

    SCF receptor is a stemcell factor that regulates growth, and metabolism.

    cAMP could be increased by gel, or by simply depleting nutriŽnts in the skin. Decreasing blood pressure on those places, etc.
    Hey Zwolver!Thanks for detailing it more for me,man!You said previously that I should introduce supplements for the ET3(endothelin peptide) and SCF(stemcell factor) and I should modify/increase cAMP concentrations,right?What supplements you had in mind?And what kind of gel could increase cAMP?And how could I deplete nutrients in the skin?Never heard of this.I am a complete noob in biology,so sorry for so so many questions,you are a very kind guy.And one final question,achieving all those things you outlined,can I see physical changes?Like lighter hair,fairer skin etc. ?
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    Quote Originally Posted by anonymous74 View Post
    Hey Zwolver!Thanks for detailing it more for me,man!You said previously that I should introduce supplements for the ET3(endothelin peptide) and SCF(stemcell factor) and I should modify/increase cAMP concentrations,right?

    What supplements you had in mind?

    And what kind of gel could increase cAMP?

    And how could I deplete nutrients in the skin?

    Never heard of this.I am a complete noob in biology,so sorry for so so many questions,you are a very kind guy.And one final question,achieving all those things you outlined,can I see physical changes?Like lighter hair,fairer skin etc. ?
    alphaMSH activates the receptors that count for the production of pheomelanin. However this compound has an effect on eumelanin as well.

    Regulation of eumelanin/pheomelanin synthesis and visible pigmentation in melanocytes by ligands of the melanocortin 1 receptor.

    Le Pape E1, Wakamatsu K, Ito S, Wolber R, Hearing VJ.
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    Abstract

    The production of melanin in the hair and skin is tightly regulated by the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) whose activation is controlled by two secreted ligands, alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alphaMSH) and agouti signal protein (ASP). As melanin is extremely stable, lasting years in biological tissues, the mechanism underlying the relatively rapid decrease in visible pigmentation elicited by ASP is of obvious interest. In this study, the effects of ASP and alphaMSH on the regulation of melanin synthesis and on visible pigmentation were assessed in normal murine melanocytes and were compared with the quick depigmenting effect of the tyrosinase inhibitor, phenylthiourea (PTU). alphaMSH increased pheomelanin levels prior to increasing eumelanin content over 4 days of treatment. Conversely, ASP switched off the pigment synthesis pathway, reducing eu- and pheo-melanin synthesis within 1 day of treatment that was proportional to the decrease in tyrosinase protein level and activity. These results demonstrate that the visible depigmentation of melanocytes induced by ASP does not require the degradation of existing melanin but rather is due to the dilution of existing melanin by melanocyte turnover, which emphasizes the importance of pigment distribution to visible color.

    Which gel increases cAMP concentrations.. simply put, cAMP containing gel.. I bet it is in some sport massage gels. Some will probably think it increases the ATP concentration in the cells eventually. Increased production if anything controlled by cAMP is a side effect of the gel.

    Depleting nutriŽnts in the skin, releases cAMP, in theory, but it also prevents using this cAMP because of lack of energy, so this won't work.

    Whether you see physical changes, i can't tell. But the quote above states it does increase pigmentation. So... you might..
    anonymous74 likes this.
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zwolver View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by anonymous74 View Post
    Hey Zwolver!Thanks for detailing it more for me,man!You said previously that I should introduce supplements for the ET3(endothelin peptide) and SCF(stemcell factor) and I should modify/increase cAMP concentrations,right?

    What supplements you had in mind?

    And what kind of gel could increase cAMP?

    And how could I deplete nutrients in the skin?

    Never heard of this.I am a complete noob in biology,so sorry for so so many questions,you are a very kind guy.And one final question,achieving all those things you outlined,can I see physical changes?Like lighter hair,fairer skin etc. ?
    alphaMSH activates the receptors that count for the production of pheomelanin. However this compound has an effect on eumelanin as well.

    Regulation of eumelanin/pheomelanin synthesis and visible pigmentation in melanocytes by ligands of the melanocortin 1 receptor.

    Le Pape E1, Wakamatsu K, Ito S, Wolber R, Hearing VJ.
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    Abstract

    The production of melanin in the hair and skin is tightly regulated by the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) whose activation is controlled by two secreted ligands, alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alphaMSH) and agouti signal protein (ASP). As melanin is extremely stable, lasting years in biological tissues, the mechanism underlying the relatively rapid decrease in visible pigmentation elicited by ASP is of obvious interest. In this study, the effects of ASP and alphaMSH on the regulation of melanin synthesis and on visible pigmentation were assessed in normal murine melanocytes and were compared with the quick depigmenting effect of the tyrosinase inhibitor, phenylthiourea (PTU). alphaMSH increased pheomelanin levels prior to increasing eumelanin content over 4 days of treatment. Conversely, ASP switched off the pigment synthesis pathway, reducing eu- and pheo-melanin synthesis within 1 day of treatment that was proportional to the decrease in tyrosinase protein level and activity. These results demonstrate that the visible depigmentation of melanocytes induced by ASP does not require the degradation of existing melanin but rather is due to the dilution of existing melanin by melanocyte turnover, which emphasizes the importance of pigment distribution to visible color.

    Which gel increases cAMP concentrations.. simply put, cAMP containing gel.. I bet it is in some sport massage gels. Some will probably think it increases the ATP concentration in the cells eventually. Increased production if anything controlled by cAMP is a side effect of the gel.

    Depleting nutriŽnts in the skin, releases cAMP, in theory, but it also prevents using this cAMP because of lack of energy, so this won't work.

    Whether you see physical changes, i can't tell. But the quote above states it does increase pigmentation. So... you might..
    So,if I got it right from the above article:alphaMSH will increase pheomelanin,but it will increase eumelanin too.But if an individual who has more eumelanin(like me) will somehow manage to increase his alphaMSH or make it more active or whatnot,than maybe only his pheomelanin will increase(?).Now the question is,how can the alphaMSH be increased to activate more the receptors that count the production of pheomelanin?
    On a second note,if I find a gel/anything which contains cyclic adenosine monophosphate(I think you referred to this with cAMP) and (over)use it it will simply increase my pheomelanin production over time?It sounds too simple and good to be true.You know of any product that contains cAMP by chance?
    Finally to summarize:I need to increase alphaMSH and cAMP concentrations and my pheomelanin production will rise over the moon(I hope so).Now,do you know any products/medications that can do that?I googled cAMP containing gel and nothing came up.And if these gels are commercially available,everybody who uses them will become blonde and blue eyed,or you need to overdose it fairly?
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    Quote Originally Posted by anonymous74 View Post
    So,if I got it right from the above article:alphaMSH will increase pheomelanin,but it will increase eumelanin too.But if an individual who has more eumelanin(like me) will somehow manage to increase his alphaMSH or make it more active or whatnot,than maybe only his pheomelanin will increase(?).Now the question is,how can the alphaMSH be increased to activate more the receptors that count the production of pheomelanin?
    On a second note,if I find a gel/anything which contains cyclic adenosine monophosphate(I think you referred to this with cAMP) and (over)use it it will simply increase my pheomelanin production over time?It sounds too simple and good to be true.You know of any product that contains cAMP by chance?
    Finally to summarize:I need to increase alphaMSH and cAMP concentrations and my pheomelanin production will rise over the moon(I hope so).Now,do you know any products/medications that can do that?I googled cAMP containing gel and nothing came up.And if these gels are commercially available,everybody who uses them will become blonde and blue eyed,or you need to overdose it fairly?
    Hmm, why would you want to turn yourself blonde anyway, if you want this, dye your hair. You can't change your eye color, because it's not linked to this gene. This gel however could exist, but also it could not exist. If it does, then cAMP wil have a pseudonym. Like phosphatased adenine. Changing your hair color with this won't work either. because it is an activator for LIVING skin, which hair is not. Your new hair however could turn out blonde, but if your own melanin is overwhelming in concentrations, it won't be noticable.

    I couldn't find any gel of this kind myself, but i do however find a link between this and either losing weight or building muscle tissue, so i assumed it was there somewhere. I mean, snakevenom is used to treat cancer, grounded rocks are used to treat colon blockage, and cucumber is used to retain smooth and flexible skin.

    However, the one rule, never experiment without KNOWING the outcome. This actually disclaims the whole reason of experimenting, because it would just be producing. Seriously, don't mess around with chemicals... If you really want to be blonde, dye your hair, if you want blue eyes, thought luck your can't change them. Using colored lenses does a little in that regard.

    Some people tan extremely, to become "black" or to just go with the hype of tanning. But this is unhealthy, i advice to have a talk with someone professional to help you accept that it doesn't matter which color your hair is, or your eyes are. We are all red on the inside..

    Peace
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zwolver View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by anonymous74 View Post
    So,if I got it right from the above article:alphaMSH will increase pheomelanin,but it will increase eumelanin too.But if an individual who has more eumelanin(like me) will somehow manage to increase his alphaMSH or make it more active or whatnot,than maybe only his pheomelanin will increase(?).Now the question is,how can the alphaMSH be increased to activate more the receptors that count the production of pheomelanin?
    On a second note,if I find a gel/anything which contains cyclic adenosine monophosphate(I think you referred to this with cAMP) and (over)use it it will simply increase my pheomelanin production over time?It sounds too simple and good to be true.You know of any product that contains cAMP by chance?
    Finally to summarize:I need to increase alphaMSH and cAMP concentrations and my pheomelanin production will rise over the moon(I hope so).Now,do you know any products/medications that can do that?I googled cAMP containing gel and nothing came up.And if these gels are commercially available,everybody who uses them will become blonde and blue eyed,or you need to overdose it fairly?
    Hmm, why would you want to turn yourself blonde anyway, if you want this, dye your hair. You can't change your eye color, because it's not linked to this gene. This gel however could exist, but also it could not exist. If it does, then cAMP wil have a pseudonym. Like phosphatased adenine. Changing your hair color with this won't work either. because it is an activator for LIVING skin, which hair is not. Your new hair however could turn out blonde, but if your own melanin is overwhelming in concentrations, it won't be noticable.

    I couldn't find any gel of this kind myself, but i do however find a link between this and either losing weight or building muscle tissue, so i assumed it was there somewhere. I mean, snakevenom is used to treat cancer, grounded rocks are used to treat colon blockage, and cucumber is used to retain smooth and flexible skin.

    However, the one rule, never experiment without KNOWING the outcome. This actually disclaims the whole reason of experimenting, because it would just be producing. Seriously, don't mess around with chemicals... If you really want to be blonde, dye your hair, if you want blue eyes, thought luck your can't change them. Using colored lenses does a little in that regard.

    Some people tan extremely, to become "black" or to just go with the hype of tanning. But this is unhealthy, i advice to have a talk with someone professional to help you accept that it doesn't matter which color your hair is, or your eyes are. We are all red on the inside..

    Peace
    Hey Zwolver!I understand what are you saying,but I don't want to accept myself,I want to CHANGE myself,I want to control every aspect of my life,there would be more to write here but it's irrelevant,this is the biology section so I will post some interesting things here.You say that it isn't really possible to change my eye and hair color.I found a few interesting links,take a lookI put a space between http and dots)
    https ://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080815095249AAIzxt5
    http ://www.keratin.com/as/as008.shtml#01
    http ://www.webmd.com/drugs/drug-87530-Hydroquinone+Skin+Bleaching+Top.aspx?drugid=87530
    http ://www.stromamedical.com/page/about-us
    http ://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16792750
    http ://phes.co/obj/Newengland/Jr.Venkat/Chloroquine-Induced%20Hair%20Hypopigmentationm%20Jul%2022,%202 010.pdf
    There's info of skin,hair and eye lightening.I didn't try any of those things,so I can't attest to their credibility.You seem very knowledgeable on this matter,so maybe you might have an opinion of this.I am especially interested what will you say of these.From what you said,even if I managed to increase my pheomelanin levels this wouldn't result in any physical changes right?But what about these things in those links?

    Peace
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    www. lighteyez .com/blog

    Here Is a link to change your eye color ^^^^^^^

    Stop always believing mainstream science no matter what, a lot of stuff has been proven false the scientific community just hasn't updated a lot of info and "facts" lately to the real stuff.

    Search yourself and do experiments yourself, other's opinions without factual evidence and testing to show are just that, opinions, now if you have credintials they should be valued opinions, but at the end of the day they are just that...


    Opinions, check the site out and try and test it, already got quite a bit of successful testimonies. They don't call me "The Know It Alls Scoff At" I don't take a scientist word for it without proof from vigorous and correct testing, and even that I run through any references myself and never just assume the test are 100% accurate til I read it, cause in some of these test trials they often miss and/or do certain things wrong once you self teach yourself the basics and tad more complicated of a certain field or sub-field of study, so keep going with the hair thing, I already got an idea on some things that can maybe have you grow "red hair", there is difference between a certain pill or combination of pills BTW that would make your hair "lighter"as opposed to changing the complete genetic structure slowly to get "red hair" which is really orange or "ginger" hair if we are being honest, actual red hair is a gene relating to darker brown hair, that I am not fully knowledgeable about yet to give a detailed assessment of, but people can change their own genes and HAVE done so both on purpose and by accident if you don't auto accept mainstream science, now when I say change, I really mean alter, or activate dormant genes or change their own brain to cause their own genetic makeup to change, scientist are already experimenting with that and can change genes of animals close to humans already to do what they want, so don't give up, where many have failed, doesn't mean you will not succeed, and HEY MAN if you find out the secrets, make it a product and GET PAID!
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheGuyKnowItAllsScoffAt View Post
    a lot of stuff has been proven false the scientific community just hasn't updated a lot of info and "facts" lately to the real stuff.
    Such as? And how do you manage to know that's so?
    Opinions, check the site out and try and test it, already got quite a bit of successful testimonies.
    Testimonies != data.
    people can change their own genes and HAVE done so both on purpose and by accident
    Links please.
    I really mean alter, or activate dormant genes or change their own brain to cause their own genetic makeup to change
    Links please.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dywyddyr View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by TheGuyKnowItAllsScoffAt View Post
    a lot of stuff has been proven false the scientific community just hasn't updated a lot of info and "facts" lately to the real stuff.
    Such as? And how do you manage to know that's so?
    Opinions, check the site out and try and test it, already got quite a bit of successful testimonies.
    Testimonies != data.
    people can change their own genes and HAVE done so both on purpose and by accident
    Links please.
    I really mean alter, or activate dormant genes or change their own brain to cause their own genetic makeup to change
    Links please.

    Look up soundwave therapy and biokinesis and rife frequency studies, I could show you results, even the best of them, but one major hindering fact on much of the scientific community is you don't look for results, you look for fakes, and what you seek you will find, so even if it may be true, there is a major synical pride almost every overly serious scientist has that says "This is impossible, must be way to disprove this." so do NOT believe what I am saying on it working, that comment was for the other guy to decide that is why I even gave him a seperate link altogether to look for himself at some others, go find your own documents and never 100% trust anyone who cant bring their own, I have mines, but I am choosing consciously to ask you to research it yourself no biases or anything or influences from anyone elses telling of what it does.
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  27. #26  
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheGuyKnowItAllsScoffAt View Post
    Look up soundwave therapy and biokinesis and rife frequency studies
    Nope.
    I asked YOU to provide the links.
    BTW all three of those are bullsh*t (at least with regard to "changing genes").

    but one major hindering fact on much of the scientific community is you don't look for results, you look for fakes
    That's not a fact.

    but I am choosing consciously to ask you to research it yourself no biases or anything or influences from anyone elses telling of what it does.
    You made specific claims, it's up to you to support those claims.
    "[Dywyddyr] makes a grumpy bastard like me seem like a happy go lucky scamp" - PhDemon
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