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Thread: Best first pathogen culture ?

  1. #1 Best first pathogen culture ? 
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    Hey guys just a question .So could you tell me what is the best pathogen (human or animal ) to culture ? It could be a Bactria ,fungus , virus anything ! As long as it's a pathogen the more dangerous and common the better I was thinking salmonella herpes simplex influenza or rabies but I'm open to suggestions .Just please don't be rude, the reason it needs to be a pathogen is I love immunology and study it a lot.so tell me your suggestions (be sure to include the desiese it causes where I can find it and it's preferred medium . )and please try to avoid plant pathogens plants are a bit boring.


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    Moderator Moderator Cogito Ergo Sum's Avatar
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    If I were you, I would avoid the ones you listed (especially the influenza A and rabies viruses).
    Salmonella enterica
    serotypes and EHEC (E.coli O157:H7) are mild pathogens and thus safer to study,
    yet they require at least a laboratory with BSL-2 equipment in order to study them safely.

    If you have no previous experience nor sufficient knowledge about microbial methods and safety measurements, do not use any of them!


    "The only safe rule is to dispute only with those of your acquaintance of whom you know that they possess sufficient intelligence and self-respect not to advance absurdities; to appeal to reason and not to authority, and to listen to reason and yield to it; and, finally, to be willing to accept reason even from an opponent, and to be just enough to bear being proved to be in the wrong."

    ~ Arthur Schopenhauer, The Art of Being Right: 38 Ways to Win an Argument (1831), Stratagem XXXVIII.
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  4. #3  
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    Staphylococcus aureus (not MRSA), Bacillus subtilis, Haemophilus influenzae or E.coli would be good beginner germs.
    Cogito Ergo Sum likes this.
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zwolver View Post
    Staphylococcus aureus (not MRSA), Bacillus subtilis, Haemophilus influenzae or E.coli would be good beginner germs.
    thanks I will consider these consider these thank you both if anyone else would like to add feel free.
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  6. #5  
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    Uh tanks guys I got the bacteria but what about viruses ?
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    It would help to know what you want to do with this bacteria or virus. Any microorganism can be pathogenic in the right place. Staph epidermidis, a normal skin flora, can cause an infection in a wound. Your own E coli from your intestine can cause an urinanry tract infection, or pneumonia if it gets deep into your lungs. If you want to study serious and important "pathogens" you don't necessarily have to put yourself or others at risk. The infections that make people sick and some times even kill them aren't necessarily deadly pathogens or super bugs.

    Staphylococcus epidermidis as a cause of postopera... [Br J Surg. 1988] - PubMed - NCBI
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    Well I wanted to test the ability to become a super bug as well as changing host choice .Also testing relationships between predator and parasite .
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    Why do I have the sinking feeling, we're going to hear about this on the news? Testing the ability to become a super bug? The CDC is watching (if you're in the US) !
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    I testing the bacteria a and viruses on cell culture and against medicines not people!
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  11. #10  
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    I still have the feeling that we will hear about this on the news somehow.

    "Guy arrested for attempt at terrorism"

    "Schools no longer safe, superbug found in locker"

    "529 deaths, 129.000 infected, hospitals can barely keep up"

    "Virus that reanimates the dead discovered, is the zombie apocalypse real?"

    A virus is extremely difficult to cultivate safely. Don't bother doing that.
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
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  12. #11  
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    I don't even have a microscope :'(
    I can never know I'm right, but I can know that I'm wrong.
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  13. #12  
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    Ok but I was doing all that for that for the bigger project of studying how bacteria ,fungi and viruses started in their evolution and then got better at batting advanced creatures .
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    So I could do it with just bacteria and fungi but I find viruses origins Interesting too
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    Bacteria is pure evolution, they multiply so quickly, you'll be able to see how quickly they respond to adapting to their environment.
    I can never know I'm right, but I can know that I'm wrong.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curiosity View Post
    Bacteria is pure evolution, they multiply so quickly, you'll be able to see how quickly they respond to adapting to their environment.
    I disagree with your bold claim. You will not see evolution, but just adaptation. It is highly doubtful you will be witness of any new mutations that would be defined in evolution.

    Say you have 1000 bacteria, and say that they won't multiply at all. You add (extremely evenly) an exactly lethal dose for the average bacterium, then 50% will die. Then you let the bacterium multiply again to 1000, do the same, and you measure results.

    Just an insight question, anyone can answer this one. In case of evolution in the petridish, what would you think that would happen if you still kept the rule for killing all the average bacterium. Would your mortality rate of 50% increase or decrease at every try?

    Please state why you think so..
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zwolver View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Curiosity View Post
    Bacteria is pure evolution, they multiply so quickly, you'll be able to see how quickly they respond to adapting to their environment.
    I disagree with your bold claim. You will not see evolution, but just adaptation. It is highly doubtful you will be witness of any new mutations that would be defined in evolution.

    Say you have 1000 bacteria, and say that they won't multiply at all. You add (extremely evenly) an exactly lethal dose for the average bacterium, then 50% will die. Then you let the bacterium multiply again to 1000, do the same, and you measure results.

    Just an insight question, anyone can answer this one. In case of evolution in the petridish, what would you think that would happen if you still kept the rule for killing all the average bacterium. Would your mortality rate of 50% increase or decrease at every try?

    Please state why you think so..

    I would state that the mortality rate would decrease after every try, as only the colonies that can survive a lethal dose for the average bacterium remain. I compare it with the mechanism of antibiotic resistance.
    "The only safe rule is to dispute only with those of your acquaintance of whom you know that they possess sufficient intelligence and self-respect not to advance absurdities; to appeal to reason and not to authority, and to listen to reason and yield to it; and, finally, to be willing to accept reason even from an opponent, and to be just enough to bear being proved to be in the wrong."

    ~ Arthur Schopenhauer, The Art of Being Right: 38 Ways to Win an Argument (1831), Stratagem XXXVIII.
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    Yes the mortality rate would decrease to an extent they would adapt to that type of antibiotic or phage ( yes I will use bactophages against them as well) . And I would have to try a new one although it would probably differ depending on the species .
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    Quote Originally Posted by Burning virus View Post
    Yes the mortality rate would decrease to an extent they would adapt to that type of antibiotic or phage ( yes I will use bactophages against them as well) . And I would have to try a new one although it would probably differ depending on the species .

    Where were you planning to get those pathogens and other materials?
    And can you use a laboratory that is equipped according to the correct BSL guidelines?
    "The only safe rule is to dispute only with those of your acquaintance of whom you know that they possess sufficient intelligence and self-respect not to advance absurdities; to appeal to reason and not to authority, and to listen to reason and yield to it; and, finally, to be willing to accept reason even from an opponent, and to be just enough to bear being proved to be in the wrong."

    ~ Arthur Schopenhauer, The Art of Being Right: 38 Ways to Win an Argument (1831), Stratagem XXXVIII.
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  20. #19  
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    I am going to grow them on the correct ager and then use the antibiotics
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  21. #20  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zwolver View Post

    I disagree with your bold claim. You will not see evolution, but just adaptation.
    What is evolution, but a change in inherited characteristics over successive generations? Obviously I'm missing something, you're a molecular biology student (oh awesome, I was actually considering that major).
    Last edited by Curiosity; February 12th, 2014 at 07:53 PM.
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  22. #21  
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    Exactly!
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  23. #22  
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    Ok. Now that's done I'm going need a comprised list of bacteria please include if it's gram negative or plosives and it's best ager
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  24. #23  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cogito Ergo Sum View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Zwolver View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Curiosity View Post
    Bacteria is pure evolution, they multiply so quickly, you'll be able to see how quickly they respond to adapting to their environment.
    I disagree with your bold claim. You will not see evolution, but just adaptation. It is highly doubtful you will be witness of any new mutations that would be defined in evolution.

    Say you have 1000 bacteria, and say that they won't multiply at all. You add (extremely evenly) an exactly lethal dose for the average bacterium, then 50% will die. Then you let the bacterium multiply again to 1000, do the same, and you measure results.

    Just an insight question, anyone can answer this one. In case of evolution in the petridish, what would you think that would happen if you still kept the rule for killing all the average bacterium. Would your mortality rate of 50% increase or decrease at every try?

    Please state why you think so..

    I would state that the mortality rate would decrease after every try, as only the colonies that can survive a lethal dose for the average bacterium remain. I compare it with the mechanism of antibiotic resistance.
    It was a trick question but yes, the mortality rate will decrease at every try. Because some mutations will be beneficial, and some will be not, the ones that are a benefit will add a little, but those that are not will plummet the average. Thus more will survive because you actually lowered your average.

    You could use the mechanism of succession, and successful SNP's in the code to predict this.
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
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  25. #24  
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    Thanks you guys I've been researching. Ager and the species of bacteria that I'll want to grow I'll also do a cell culture to supply for certain viruses
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  26. #25  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curiosity View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Zwolver View Post

    I disagree with your bold claim. You will not see evolution, but just adaptation.
    What is evolution, but a change in inherited characteristics over successive generations? Obviously I'm missing something, you're a molecular biology student (oh awesome, I was actually considering that major).
    Actually i work at a university to guide PhD and Master students (new job). And i will be researching biological decay of pollutants and viscosity through a capillary medium (soil).
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
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