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Thread: Is it just me that has bad senses?

  1. #1 Is it just me that has bad senses? 
    Forum Senior Weterman's Avatar
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    My sense of touch isnt good, like if i have a cut and i get some juice or something in it, i cant tell if i am hurting from heat or the cut. like once i had a cut on my thumb, i had a bowl with greasy stuff in it, my hand was in bowl, my thumb, where the cut was, touched the bowl. it felt hot. i was confused to why the bowl was so hot. so i looked at the bowl, and i touched it with my finger, it wasnt hot. it must have been some juice got into my thumb. when i felt it, i actually thought the bowl was hot.

    also, whenever i touch something hot, or pinch myself, it takes 2 or 3 seconds to start feeling the pain. but i feel the touch instant. why is this?


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  3. #2  
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    Some people just aren't that sensitive in one way or another. My grandfather was a bit like you in terms of touch. He didn't much care about small injuries from gardening and he had a terrible time with all those fiddly buttons and other accessories for ceremonial / parade dress for some events.

    He was much the same with tastes and had a poor sense of smell. I reckon his vision was pretty good. But I have no way of knowing how good his hearing might once have been without two world wars worth of artillery explosions and small arms fire. By the time I knew him he was pretty deaf.

    My husband often has No Idea At All about how he acquired quite remarkable bruises, as well as minor cuts and scratches from working outside. He just doesn't notice unless there's blood everywhere. At least he's sensible about washing and bandaging that sort of thing.


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    Theatre Whore babe's Avatar
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    After my car accident I lost partial feeling in my hands and feet. My sensitivity to heat ....sometimes comes a little too late, my balance has affected my dance. Sometimes it is from something physical as an accident and sometimes people just don't have the same "senses" as another.

    Just be aware of things that could be dangerous!

    I have a GF who can't smell!!!!

    We are all different and special in our own way.
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  5. #4  
    Time Lord
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    That pain response is somewhat learned should contradict our most basic understanding of instincts, but it appears so.

    Babies show puzzling inconsistencies. They cry alot, from discomfort, or alarm, but when physically injured babies may take the time to turn enquiringly to parents, "Should I cry about this?" and watch for our response. They seem more upset by the surprise of an accident than the physical hurt. My baby son got 2nd degree burns on his palm, from grasping a lightbulb and holding it 'till his mom saw that and pulled him off. Then he cried, at our panic. Later as a nurse snipped away cooked skin and cleaned the raw meat, we were calm and he hardly flinched. Next day crawling blithely with his oozy palm for traction on the carpet, bandage pulled off, he didn't care.

    I've only taken pain killers once (besides mutely acquiescing to the dentist) and I felt like a cheat. It was anti-inflammatory pills for a shoulder injury, so I could get back to work. Maybe someday I'll be pleading for morphine but I hope not. Pain doesn't disturb me much - it's just a valuable signal to modify my behavior.
    A pong by any other name is still a pong. -williampinn
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  6. #5  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope sculptor's Avatar
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    weterman
    Is this a recent change?
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  7. #6  
    Forum Senior Weterman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sculptor View Post
    weterman
    Is this a recent change?
    no why?
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  8. #7  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope sculptor's Avatar
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    acute vs cronic means something
    acute is more of what I understand
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  9. #8  
    Theatre Whore babe's Avatar
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    I understand living in chronic and sometimes debilitating pain, as I have done it for 14 years as of March 16th.

    I do not take pain killers. They mask, they don't resolve. I choose to not THINK about it, when possible and to exercise, keep active and wallow in the fact that I proved a few orthopedists wrong.

    I believe, in spite of the circumstances, that finding the silver linings in life daily, laughter, and creating joy in your own life is better than any pain medication.

    If I have a bad day, well I figure I needed the extra rest! No worries..tomorrow will be better!
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  10. #9  
    Forum Ph.D.
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    Chronic insensitivity may just be you. Acute, or developing in the last year or so, could be a symptom of something more serious. For example, Leporsy, which is a baterial infection of the peripheral nerves does little direct damage except to those nerves. All the horrific effects of the disease follow from those nerves being put out of commission. Diabetes also damages peripheral nerves.
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  11. #10  
    Forum Professor Zwolver's Avatar
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    just a short copy paste from a website.

    Aging changes in the senses: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia

    Touch, Vibration, and Pain

    The sense of touch also includes being aware of pain, temperature, pressure, vibration, and body position. Skin, muscles, tendons, joints, and internal organs have nerve endings (receptors) that detect these sensations. Some receptors give the brain information about the position and condition of internal organs. Though you may not be aware of this information, it helps to identify changes (for example, the pain of appendicitis).
    Your brain interprets the type and amount of touch sensation. It also interprets the sensation as pleasant (such as being comfortably warm), unpleasant (such as being very hot), or neutral (such as being aware that you are touching something).
    Watch this video about:Feeling pain

    With aging, you may have reduced or changed sensations. These changes can be related to decreased blood flow to the nerve endings or to the spinal cord or brain. The spinal cord transmits nerve signals and the brain interprets the signals.
    Health problems such as lack of certain nutrients can also cause sensation changes. Brain surgery, problems in the brain, confusion, nerve damage from injury or chronic diseases such diabetes can also result in changes in sensation.
    Symptoms of changed sensation vary based on the cause. With decreased temperature sensitivity, it can be hard to tell the difference between cool and cold and between hot and warm. This can increase risk of injury from frostbite, hypothermia (dangerously low body temperature), and burns.
    Reduced ability to detect vibration, touch, and pressure increases the risk of injuries, including pressure ulcers. After age 50, many people have reduced sensitivity to pain. Or you may feel and recognize pain, but it does not bother you. For example, when you are injured, you may not know how severe the injury is because the pain does not trouble you.
    You may develop problems with walking because of reduced ability to perceive where your body is in relation to the floor. This increases your risk of falling, a common problem for older people.
    Older persons can develop an increased sensitivity to light touch because of thinner skin.
    If you are having symptoms of changes in touch, pain, or problems standing or walking, talk with your health care provider. There may be ways to manage the symptoms.
    The following measures can help you stay safe:
    • Adjust hot water heater temperature to no higher than 125F (51C) to avoid burns.
    • Check the thermometer to decide how to dress rather than waiting until you feel overheated or chilled.
    • Inspect your skin, especially your feet, for injuries. If you find an injury, treat it. Do not assume that because an area is not painful, the injury is not significant.
    As You Grow Older, You Will Have Other Changes, Including:

    References

    Caprio TV, Williams TF. Comprehensive geriatric assessment. In: Duthie EH, Katz PR, Malone ML, eds. Practice of Geriatrics. 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2007:chap 4.
    Hile ES, Studenski SA. Instability and falls. In: Duthie EH, Katz PR, Malone ML, eds. Practice of Geriatrics. 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2007:chap 17.
    Minaker KL. Common clinical sequelae of aging. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman’sCecil Medicine. 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 24.
    Seshamani M, Kashima ML. Special considerations in managing geriatric patients. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund LJ, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery. 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2010:chap 16.
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
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  12. #11  
    Time Lord
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    problems with walking because of reduced ability to perceive where your body is in relation to the floor. This increases your risk of falling
    Yep. For decades we'd been making seniors fall by encasing their feet with orthopedic inserts. There's good work recently in footwear that better transmits pressure sensation, and even amplifies it!
    A pong by any other name is still a pong. -williampinn
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    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
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    You give your age as 15, Weterman. You talk about your hands in the OP but what about other parts of your body? Have you always had a high pain tolerance? Do you do a lot of physical work with your hands? Also, have you undergone a recent growth spurt?

    (In working with young horses, I notice that when they go through various growth spurts that they seem to be more prone to minor injuries and rather oblivious to it all.)

    One does not want to ignore any noticeable change in sensitivity in case it is a precursor to something more serious, hence my several questions.
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  14. #13  
    Forum Professor Zwolver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Weterman View Post
    also, whenever i touch something hot, or pinch myself, it takes 2 or 3 seconds to start feeling the pain. but i feel the touch instant. why is this?
    I missed this part earlier. This part is interesting.

    Touch is a simple stimuli, which only requires a nerve and a severity. It signals to the brain something hit it. The spine directly tells you there is something there. Your brain then looks for similar stimuli, and processes this. If this paints the image of a damaged piece of skin, or tendon, or bone, you will feel the slightly higher brain function called pain. This is also why you could just jump up because something hurt you, but nothing happened. This is because your brain made a mistake interpreting a number of stimuli.

    Furthermore i have no experience in this, or a high degree in neurology, so just use it to paint your own image, don't think i am 100% correct.
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
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  15. #14  
    Forum Senior Weterman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scheherazade View Post
    You give your age as 15, Weterman. You talk about your hands in the OP but what about other parts of your body? Have you always had a high pain tolerance? Do you do a lot of physical work with your hands? Also, have you undergone a recent growth spurt?

    (In working with young horses, I notice that when they go through various growth spurts that they seem to be more prone to minor injuries and rather oblivious to it all.)

    One does not want to ignore any noticeable change in sensitivity in case it is a precursor to something more serious, hence my several questions.
    i dont have high tolerance to pain. the pain is just delayed.
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  16. #15  
    Theatre Whore babe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Weterman View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by scheherazade View Post
    You give your age as 15, Weterman. You talk about your hands in the OP but what about other parts of your body? Have you always had a high pain tolerance? Do you do a lot of physical work with your hands? Also, have you undergone a recent growth spurt?

    (In working with young horses, I notice that when they go through various growth spurts that they seem to be more prone to minor injuries and rather oblivious to it all.)

    One does not want to ignore any noticeable change in sensitivity in case it is a precursor to something more serious, hence my several questions.
    i dont have high tolerance to pain. the pain is just delayed.
    And I have high tolerance.
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  17. #16  
    Forum Professor Zwolver's Avatar
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    I have a high tolerance to bullshit.
    jocular and babe like this.
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
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  18. #17  
    Bullshit Intolerant PhDemon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zwolver View Post
    I have a high tolerance to bullshit.
    I don't (as you can probably tell from my posts on this forum...)
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  19. #18  
    Theatre Whore babe's Avatar
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    JOCULAR!! Nice to see your name!
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