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Thread: urgent help needed-microbiology

  1. #1 urgent help needed-microbiology 
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    hi, i've visited the forums a few times before but now that i need help i decided to make an account

    i'm being a bit of an idiot and i would appreciate it if you guys can help me with this problem x

    so in the secondary lymphoid organs the dendritic cells that are activated interact with Th cells. So my question is what exactly happens during this process/"dance"? and when B cells interact with Th cells, how is the interaction different?

    any help will be appreciated x


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  3. #2  
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    i'm still monitoring this thread, can someone help me please? thanks


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    I'm an idiot too so let me try to clarify some of this for you. The endocterin system and hormones are circulated in the take up lymph system and the dentrinites (nerve cells?) are affected. Th,B activated? So its a hormonal effect on nerve cells. Being an an idiot myself, thats as far as I got.
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    Quote Originally Posted by bio View Post
    hi, i've visited the forums a few times before but now that i need help i decided to make an account

    i'm being a bit of an idiot and i would appreciate it if you guys can help me with this problem x

    so in the secondary lymphoid organs the dendritic cells that are activated interact with Th cells. So my question is what exactly happens during this process/"dance"? and when B cells interact with Th cells, how is the interaction different?

    any help will be appreciated x
    Can you find a page on Wikipedia that helps, if you tell me the name of the page (heading ) I'll then answer your question, but at the moment I'm just unsure of the terminology you have used.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hill Billy Holmes View Post
    I'm an idiot too so let me try to clarify some of this for you. The endocterin system and hormones are circulated in the take up lymph system and the dentrinites (nerve cells?) are affected. Th,B activated? So its a hormonal effect on nerve cells. Being an an idiot myself, thats as far as I got.
    no the dendritic cells of the immune system, not dendrites
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    Oh ,Ok back to Wiki.
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  8. #7  
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    haha thanks for helping, i really appreciate it
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    Quote Originally Posted by bio View Post
    hi, i've visited the forums a few times before but now that i need help i decided to make an account

    i'm being a bit of an idiot and i would appreciate it if you guys can help me with this problem x

    so in the secondary lymphoid organs the dendritic cells that are activated interact with Th cells. So my question is what exactly happens during this process/"dance"? and when B cells interact with Th cells, how is the interaction different?

    any help will be appreciated x
    Stimulation of Adaptive Immunity - YouTube
    Stimulation of Adaptive Immunity

    covers some of the terms you mentioned.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robittybob1 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by bio View Post
    hi, i've visited the forums a few times before but now that i need help i decided to make an account

    i'm being a bit of an idiot and i would appreciate it if you guys can help me with this problem x

    so in the secondary lymphoid organs the dendritic cells that are activated interact with Th cells. So my question is what exactly happens during this process/"dance"? and when B cells interact with Th cells, how is the interaction different?

    any help will be appreciated x
    Stimulation of Adaptive Immunity - YouTube
    Stimulation of Adaptive Immunity

    covers some of the terms you mentioned.
    doesn't quite help with my question but thanks
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    Quote Originally Posted by bio View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Robittybob1 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by bio View Post
    hi, i've visited the forums a few times before but now that i need help i decided to make an account

    i'm being a bit of an idiot and i would appreciate it if you guys can help me with this problem x

    so in the secondary lymphoid organs the dendritic cells that are activated interact with Th cells. So my question is what exactly happens during this process/"dance"? and when B cells interact with Th cells, how is the interaction different?

    any help will be appreciated x
    Stimulation of Adaptive Immunity - YouTube
    Stimulation of Adaptive Immunity

    covers some of the terms you mentioned.
    doesn't quite help with my question but thanks
    Were there any articles covering your question on Google? Find the article and I'll read it and answer your questions.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robittybob1 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by bio View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Robittybob1 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by bio View Post
    hi, i've visited the forums a few times before but now that i need help i decided to make an account

    i'm being a bit of an idiot and i would appreciate it if you guys can help me with this problem x

    so in the secondary lymphoid organs the dendritic cells that are activated interact with Th cells. So my question is what exactly happens during this process/"dance"? and when B cells interact with Th cells, how is the interaction different?

    any help will be appreciated x
    Stimulation of Adaptive Immunity - YouTube
    Stimulation of Adaptive Immunity

    covers some of the terms you mentioned.
    doesn't quite help with my question but thanks
    Were there any articles covering your question on Google? Find the article and I'll read it and answer your questions.
    don't think so.
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  13. #12  
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    “The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts.”

    Bertrand Russell
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  14. #13  
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    first book doesn't help much but thanks anyway,

    also i'm still strugling with answering this question properly :/ if anyone can help i'd be very grateful
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    Quote Originally Posted by bio View Post
    first book doesn't help much but thanks anyway,

    also i'm still strugling with answering this question properly :/ if anyone can help i'd be very grateful

    Ok if you didn't get any joy from the book links I gave you then I suggest you start with the Wiki link for Helper T cells, because this seems to be what you are refering to as Th cells, once you have a grasp of these you can move on to the subsequent interactions, this should give you some actual understanding of what is going on, rather than me spending time paraphrasing.

    T helper cell - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    “The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts.”

    Bertrand Russell
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ascended View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by bio View Post
    first book doesn't help much but thanks anyway,

    also i'm still strugling with answering this question properly :/ if anyone can help i'd be very grateful

    Ok if you didn't get any joy from the book links I gave you then I suggest you start with the Wiki link for Helper T cells, because this seems to be what you are refering to as Th cells, once you have a grasp of these you can move on to the subsequent interactions, this should give you some actual understanding of what is going on, rather than me spending time paraphrasing.

    T helper cell - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    i know what they are

    i just want to know how dendritic cells interact with the t-cell helper and what happens while they interact and why the interaction is different when compared to the interaction between b cells and th cells.

    couldn't find anything that explains this clearly yet :l
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  17. #16  
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    Ok perhaps this diagram might better help you understand:



    Or maybe this helpful video:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?featur...&v=uwMYpTYsNZM

    Or this introduction to Dendritic cell interactions:

    http://c.ymcdn.com/sites/www.cellthe...n_Brochure.pdf
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    Bertrand Russell
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  18. #17  
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    thank you, taking a look at it now
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    Did a Yahoo search in videos "how dentritic cells work" got a bunch of links. This subject then is how white blood cells transform to accomidate different new bacterias using receptors.
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    If you are looking for the exact interchange for dentritic cells activating Helper T cells, then there is a good diagram from the book link I gave you:



    A mature antigen-presenting cell can deliver both signal 1 and 2 and thereby activate the T cell. (B) An immature antigen-presenting cell delivers signal 1 without signal 2, which can kill or inactivate the T cell; this is one mechanism for immunological tolerance to self antigens. One model for the role of signal 2 is that it induces the active transport of signaling proteins in the T cell plasma membrane to the site of contact between the T cell and the antigen-presenting cell. The accumulation of signaling proteins around the T cell receptor is thought to greatly enhance the intensity and duration of the signaling process activated by signal 1. In this way, “immunological synapses” form in the contact zone.
    “The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts.”

    Bertrand Russell
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    Probably looking for information down to the molecule level. Exact inputs, transformation, resultants,and application stuff.
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  22. #21  
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    guys i got it now i think thanks

    There are different types of dendritic cells: follicular and 'normal'. The normal ones are tissue resident and travel to the lymphoid organ and stay put and wait for a naive T-cell to discover it when it has encountered an antigen. These mature dendritic cells prime T-cells with CCL18 cytokine, the antigen binding to the T cell receptor and the binding of B7 ligand with the CD28 receptor on the dendritic and T cell respectively. After T cell differentiation a T-helper cell can assume the role of an antigen presenting cell and along with Il-4, Il-5, Il-6 cytokine release, present the antigen along with the CD40-CD40L interaction on the B and T cell respectively. B-cells can also be activated by follicular dendritic cells which reside in the follicle of lymphoid organs and where antigens are given from the macrophage to the follicular dendritic cell. B cell can also be activated on in the sub capsular sinus by macrophages.


    The key is that if the B-cell sees an antigen on a macrophage/ follicular dendrite cell it still needs further activation of T helper cell. These primed B cells travel to an area where T cells also pass through and they need to have the same antigen to be activated. This means MHCeptide complex (MHC w/ peptide antigen B cells side and T cell receptor on T cell side )




    The way antigens are shown by antigen presenting cells (macrophages/dendrites) are always on MHC but you need more than just an MHC + peptide to elicit activation.
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    Quote Originally Posted by bio View Post
    guys i got it now i think thanks

    There are different types of dendritic cells: follicular and 'normal'. The normal ones are tissue resident and travel to the lymphoid organ and stay put and wait for a naive T-cell to discover it when it has encountered an antigen. These mature dendritic cells prime T-cells with CCL18 cytokine, the antigen binding to the T cell receptor and the binding of B7 ligand with the CD28 receptor on the dendritic and T cell respectively. After T cell differentiation a T-helper cell can assume the role of an antigen presenting cell and along with Il-4, Il-5, Il-6 cytokine release, present the antigen along with the CD40-CD40L interaction on the B and T cell respectively. B-cells can also be activated by follicular dendritic cells which reside in the follicle of lymphoid organs and where antigens are given from the macrophage to the follicular dendritic cell. B cell can also be activated on in the sub capsular sinus by macrophages.


    The key is that if the B-cell sees an antigen on a macrophage/ follicular dendrite cell it still needs further activation of T helper cell. These primed B cells travel to an area where T cells also pass through and they need to have the same antigen to be activated. This means MHCeptide complex (MHC w/ peptide antigen B cells side and T cell receptor on T cell side )




    The way antigens are shown by antigen presenting cells (macrophages/dendrites) are always on MHC but you need more than just an MHC + peptide to elicit activation.
    That was really great that we were able to help you, and more so that you wrote out your answer and posted it back to the forum. I appreciated that even though I didn't contribute much myself.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robittybob1 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by bio View Post
    guys i got it now i think thanks

    There are different types of dendritic cells: follicular and 'normal'. The normal ones are tissue resident and travel to the lymphoid organ and stay put and wait for a naive T-cell to discover it when it has encountered an antigen. These mature dendritic cells prime T-cells with CCL18 cytokine, the antigen binding to the T cell receptor and the binding of B7 ligand with the CD28 receptor on the dendritic and T cell respectively. After T cell differentiation a T-helper cell can assume the role of an antigen presenting cell and along with Il-4, Il-5, Il-6 cytokine release, present the antigen along with the CD40-CD40L interaction on the B and T cell respectively. B-cells can also be activated by follicular dendritic cells which reside in the follicle of lymphoid organs and where antigens are given from the macrophage to the follicular dendritic cell. B cell can also be activated on in the sub capsular sinus by macrophages.


    The key is that if the B-cell sees an antigen on a macrophage/ follicular dendrite cell it still needs further activation of T helper cell. These primed B cells travel to an area where T cells also pass through and they need to have the same antigen to be activated. This means MHCeptide complex (MHC w/ peptide antigen B cells side and T cell receptor on T cell side )




    The way antigens are shown by antigen presenting cells (macrophages/dendrites) are always on MHC but you need more than just an MHC + peptide to elicit activation.
    That was really great that we were able to help you, and more so that you wrote out your answer and posted it back to the forum. I appreciated that even though I didn't contribute much myself.
    haha really appreciated the help from you guys also that isn't the proper/final answer
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  25. #24  
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    Quote Originally Posted by bio View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Robittybob1 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by bio View Post
    guys i got it now i think thanks

    There are different types of dendritic cells: follicular and 'normal'. The normal ones are tissue resident and travel to the lymphoid organ and stay put and wait for a naive T-cell to discover it when it has encountered an antigen. These mature dendritic cells prime T-cells with CCL18 cytokine, the antigen binding to the T cell receptor and the binding of B7 ligand with the CD28 receptor on the dendritic and T cell respectively. After T cell differentiation a T-helper cell can assume the role of an antigen presenting cell and along with Il-4, Il-5, Il-6 cytokine release, present the antigen along with the CD40-CD40L interaction on the B and T cell respectively. B-cells can also be activated by follicular dendritic cells which reside in the follicle of lymphoid organs and where antigens are given from the macrophage to the follicular dendritic cell. B cell can also be activated on in the sub capsular sinus by macrophages.


    The key is that if the B-cell sees an antigen on a macrophage/ follicular dendrite cell it still needs further activation of T helper cell. These primed B cells travel to an area where T cells also pass through and they need to have the same antigen to be activated. This means MHCeptide complex (MHC w/ peptide antigen B cells side and T cell receptor on T cell side )




    The way antigens are shown by antigen presenting cells (macrophages/dendrites) are always on MHC but you need more than just an MHC + peptide to elicit activation.
    That was really great that we were able to help you, and more so that you wrote out your answer and posted it back to the forum. I appreciated that even though I didn't contribute much myself.
    haha really appreciated the help from you guys also that isn't the proper/final answer
    Lol cool, because we still arn't sure what you were really trying to find out
    “The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts.”

    Bertrand Russell
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ascended View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by bio View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Robittybob1 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by bio View Post
    guys i got it now i think thanks

    There are different types of dendritic cells: follicular and 'normal'. The normal ones are tissue resident and travel to the lymphoid organ and stay put and wait for a naive T-cell to discover it when it has encountered an antigen. These mature dendritic cells prime T-cells with CCL18 cytokine, the antigen binding to the T cell receptor and the binding of B7 ligand with the CD28 receptor on the dendritic and T cell respectively. After T cell differentiation a T-helper cell can assume the role of an antigen presenting cell and along with Il-4, Il-5, Il-6 cytokine release, present the antigen along with the CD40-CD40L interaction on the B and T cell respectively. B-cells can also be activated by follicular dendritic cells which reside in the follicle of lymphoid organs and where antigens are given from the macrophage to the follicular dendritic cell. B cell can also be activated on in the sub capsular sinus by macrophages.


    The key is that if the B-cell sees an antigen on a macrophage/ follicular dendrite cell it still needs further activation of T helper cell. These primed B cells travel to an area where T cells also pass through and they need to have the same antigen to be activated. This means MHCeptide complex (MHC w/ peptide antigen B cells side and T cell receptor on T cell side )




    The way antigens are shown by antigen presenting cells (macrophages/dendrites) are always on MHC but you need more than just an MHC + peptide to elicit activation.
    That was really great that we were able to help you, and more so that you wrote out your answer and posted it back to the forum. I appreciated that even though I didn't contribute much myself.
    haha really appreciated the help from you guys also that isn't the proper/final answer
    Lol cool, because we still arn't sure what you were really trying to find out

    sorry if i wasn't clear enough :$
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  27. #26  
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    Hey dude no probs, we just wanna help
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    hey er so does anybody know what the advantage of having naïve and experienced t cells circulating through secondary lymphoid organs is?

    thanks x
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    nevermind got it^
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