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Thread: continuing evolution

  1. #1 continuing evolution 
    Moderator Moderator AlexP's Avatar
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    I know that we did not "evolve from monkeys," but given enough time, would we observe animals such as chimps (which i know are not monkeys) becoming more and more human-like (or not human-like, but just significantly closer to the capabilities of humans)? And what about our own human species? It seems like medicine and other technology would slow down if not stop our evolution since even the weaker of us can survive to reproductive age.


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  3. #2 Re: continuing evolution 
    Forum Professor captaincaveman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chemboy
    I know that we did not "evolve from monkeys," but given enough time, would we observe animals such as chimps (which i know are not monkeys) becoming more and more human-like (or not human-like, but just significantly closer to the capabilities of humans)? And what about our own human species? It seems like medicine and other technology would slow down if not stop our evolution since even the weaker of us can survive to reproductive age.
    i believe all animals are evolving or have the ability to evolve if conditions force it but why would they become more human like? They are not further down our evolutionary path but on a different one. but it depends on what you mean by more human like


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  4. #3  
    Moderator Moderator AlexP's Avatar
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    I guess i just mean that they'd become more and more advanced, possibly as advanced as humans, but after a little thought i've realized that except maybe in the case of primates, most animals would not become as advanced as humans simply because they're not built that way... I don't think giraffes will really be using tools at any point... I guess i'm not quite sure what i mean.
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  5. #4  
    Forum Professor captaincaveman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chemboy
    I guess i just mean that they'd become more and more advanced, possibly as advanced as humans, but after a little thought i've realized that except maybe in the case of primates, most animals would not become as advanced as humans simply because they're not built that way... I don't think giraffes will really be using tools at any point... I guess i'm not quite sure what i mean.

    yeah i know what your saying :-D
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  6. #5  
    Forum Junior Kolt's Avatar
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    Whales?.....Dolphins perhaps?



    If the actual mass of an organism can change to fit it's environment, I wonder if intellegence is any different. Chimps, gorillas, and most other primates live in dense forrest/canopy environments. They move from branch to branch. They work with separate 'static' objects like sticks, twigs and rocks. To be even more spacific, they have to deal with vast empty spaces - direct gravity and the very physics of movement that is defined within.

    As a result they've developed the appropriate physical features. Individual limbs for individual tasks, hands with individual fingers for gripping and tool use. Their physical features represent the requirements of their environment. So, their intellegence represents their physical features. They think in steps. They multitask by separating their problems the same way a rock is naturally separate from a stick. They apply methodologies the same way they apply a tool. I guess you can call it "Spacial Intellegence"

    Now a dolphin or whale? Completely different story. "Fluid Intellegence". If their bodies are streamlined, as a direct response to their invironment, than why not their minds? Maybe a whale is as intellegent as a chimpanzee or even a human, just not intellengent 'like' a chimp or human. This might explain why we have such difficulties deciphering their communication. They are alien to us and/or vice versa.


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  7. #6  
    Forum Masters Degree invert_nexus's Avatar
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    There is a basic fallacy in the opening question. Equating humans with a 'higher rung' on the evolutionary 'ladder'.

    There is no reason for a chimp to evolve into a human. It, instead, will evolve into a more perfect chimp. There is the possibility that it might, through convergent evolution, acquire some of the same adaptations which humans have, but there is no necessity in doing so. Nor is there a label of 'advanced' to be applied to any such adaptations.

    Evolution has no goal. There is no ladder.


    As to tool use, it's actually quite common in the animal world. Far more common than once was admitted to. Even birds use twigs to poke grubs out of holes in trees.

    Now, there is a form of tool use which is unique to humans. This is a second order phenomenon. Using tools to make other tools. As far as I am aware, no other animal duplicates this, although the chimp does come close in its behavior of tool re-use. Chimps are known to hide good tools for later use.



    Speaking of whales, I was just reading about spindle neurons. An adaptation in the brain which allows a unique type of intraneural communication which is found in humans and chimps, but also in certain large cetaceans. Whales.

    But not dolphins.

    The whales apparently evolved the spindle neuron independently even before the primates did.
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  8. #7 Re: continuing evolution 
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chemboy
    I know that we did not "evolve from monkeys," but given enough time, would we observe animals such as chimps (which i know are not monkeys) becoming more and more human-like (or not human-like, but just significantly closer to the capabilities of humans)? And what about our own human species? It seems like medicine and other technology would slow down if not stop our evolution since even the weaker of us can survive to reproductive age.
    Great apes evolved from monkeys. No, we didn't DIRECTLY evolve from New and Old World Monkeys, but we did in a way evolve from them.
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