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Thread: the evolution of man in a modern setting, is there a good treatment of these questions?

  1. #1 the evolution of man in a modern setting, is there a good treatment of these questions? 
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    It seems to me that human kind have in part warped the 'evolutionary paradigm', that is: humans can alter their own environment in bizarre ways, also we have consciousness, medicine, we preserve those that are genetically disabled. There may be other factors too. Is there a good book on these issue, something that lays out the issues from a biological anthropological perspective?


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    Change their environment. How?

    By excavating or building our own caves to live in when there are none handy? Well, beavers and termites and a lot of burrowing animals are pretty good at that too.

    By fire? Now that is exceptional.

    Books. If I were you I'd get Jared Diamond's The Third Chimpanzee - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia and go from there.

    I'd avoid most of evolutionary biology until you get a better handle on the field. A lot of the work and writing in this area is pretty unimpressive.


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    Strange answer . I have spent nearly sixty years studying related fields. I has have a fair understanding of evolutionary theory, epigenetics and biology. the link looks interesting though, reminds me of Desmond Morris - maybe a fresh perspective though. How does man change the environment? In a myriad of ways, that's the point of the question. Examples are so numerous I can only list a few - natural language, technology, health care, media, artificial conditions of existence sparcely related to human existence a hundred thousand years ago. We don't hunt for food, we don't plan crops (most of us I mean), we use contraception. We occupy our minds with thoughts that have little to do with our survival, or our inheritance .What is this all doing to the gene pool?
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    Hmm.
    If we are upping the 0.04% of CO2 in the atmosphere, being heavier than air after a few million more years it will start build up from ground level to affect the breathing of smaller humans, and there will be a selective success for taller people. Eventually,we will start to resemble giraffes OR return to the trees to ensure our continued existence.
    Last edited by wonderingstar; October 16th, 2013 at 05:38 AM.
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    "I'd avoid most of evolutionary biology until you get a better handle on the field. A lot of the work and writing in this area is pretty unimpressive."??

    Err I'd start with Dawkins. Then The Red Queen by Matt Ridley, then Diamond and Helena Cronin ( The Peacock's Tail )

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    Quote Originally Posted by adelady View Post
    A lot of the work and writing in this area is pretty unimpressive.
    Are you referring to the non-peer reviewed books in this- or all work or writing in the field?
    If non-peer reviewed books, I'd agree wholeheartedly.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neverfly View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by adelady View Post
    A lot of the work and writing in this area is pretty unimpressive.
    Are you referring to the non-peer reviewed books in this- or all work or writing in the field?
    If non-peer reviewed books, I'd agree wholeheartedly.
    yup. I've got a bookcase full from The Selfish Gene onwards, both scientific and popular science. It would be nice for someone to post a sequential reading list for people seeking to understand Evolution. Starting with Darwin's book would put most folk off.
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    "Every moment,every day,every nanosec,the world is changing,electrons bump into each other and react,people collide and alter each others path. Change isn't easy,more often it is wrenching and difficult. But maybe that's a good thing because its change that makes us strong,keeps us resilient,teaches us to evolve."

    After enjoying the above,you realize that mankind is only evolving,changing because of the physical world#
    "I am sorry for making this letter longer than usual.I actually lacked the time to make it shorter."###
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