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Thread: Bacteria divides into two - which one is still the original?

  1. #1 Bacteria divides into two - which one is still the original? 
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    Hi,

    I'm just wondering, when a bacteria reproduces by dividing into two - would you consider one of those two bacteria to be the original one and how would you know?

    Thanks.


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  3. #2  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard SkinWalker's Avatar
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    If I tear a sheet of paper in two, which is the original? The answer is that they both are.


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  4. #3  
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    I was gonna say "The one on the left!" :-D
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  5. #4  
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    None of these new bacteria is the original.
    They are two new independent beings which are *clones* of the original one.

    *Meaning identical in chemical composition and structure.*
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  6. #5  
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    When bacteria divide in two ... it is safe to say that both of the cells are daughter cells .... there is no more original!

    On the other hand, the way yeast bud ... there is a mother and a daughter cell!
    It is not so much that I have confidence in scientists being right, but that I have so much in nonscientists being wrong. --- Isaac Asimov
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  7. #6  
    Forum Masters Degree invert_nexus's Avatar
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    Actually, while old school wisdom would have it that when a bacteria divides, each resultant cell is a new cell with an extended life ahead of it, new studies have shown that this is not the case.

    It turns out that as a bacteria culture divides and reproduces, cells age and eventually reach a reproduction limit. Daughter cells are new, but the mother cell is old.

    Thus, bacterial immortality is a thing of the past.

    Unfortunately for any who might not believe me without some form of citation behind my statement, I don't remember which issue of Science I read this in. It was within the past two years, I remember that, but can't give any more details I'm afraid.
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  8. #7  
    Forum Masters Degree invert_nexus's Avatar
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    Ah. That was easy.
    Here's the link.
    Immortality Dies as Bacteria Show Their Age

    However, you have to be a member of Science to read, so I'll paste it here (shh, don't tell anyone.)

    Immortality Dies as Bacteria Show Their Age
    Dan Ferber


    "I don't want to achieve immortality through my work," Woody Allen once said. "I want to achieve it by not dying." Although that's unlikely for Allen and other higher organisms, many biologists believed that immortality was possible for microbes. Now, however, a new study suggests that bacteria get old, a finding that may give scientists a new tool to understand aging. "It's one of those exciting results that makes you take a fresh look at what you think you know," says gerontologist Thomas Kirkwood of the University of Newcastle in Newcastle upon Tyne, U.K.

    Biologists already knew that when it comes to aging, all cells are not created equal. In the 1970s, Kirkwood offered the disposable-soma theory: Cells of the body, or soma, can deteriorate, but the germ line cells have to take better care of themselves because they give rise to sperm and eggs. Simple organisms such as budding yeast engage in a subtler division of labor; aging yeast parents invest their freshest components in their buds. But biologists believed that immortality was possible for microbes that divide into identical-looking daughter cells.

    To test that assumption, microbiologist Eric Stewart of INSERM in Paris tracked the fate of individual Escherichia coli cells. The rod-shaped bacterium divides in half to form two identical-looking daughter cells, which contain one old end, or pole, inherited from the parent and one new pole. When those daughter cells split, only two of the four resulting cells will have poles from the original cell. Current thinking assumed that all four cells were the same.

    The INSERM team tracked the growth of single cells and their descendants on a specially designed microscope slide, taking images every 2 to 4 minutes for up to 6 hours. Ultimately, they tracked 94 colonies, consisting of more than 35,000 individual cells. By comparing 7953 pairs of sister cells, the researchers discovered that cells that inherited the older pole of the parent grew 2.2% more slowly than those that inherited a younger pole. The bigger the difference in age, the bigger the difference in growth rate, they report in the February PLoS Biology--a result the team attributes to "decreased metabolic efficiency." The results mean that even "an apparently symmetrically dividing organism is subject to aging" and "make it unlikely that natural selection produced an immortal organism," Stewart says.

    Leonard Guarente, who studies aging at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, agrees, saying that the results "put the onus of proof on anyone who claims that cells can be immortal."

    Biogerontologist George Martin of the University of Washington, Seattle, calls the results "conceptually very important" but cautions that the cells that slow and stop reproducing may just be taking a break to repair themselves. If further study shows that the older cells are actually dying off, it would "make biogerontologists take seriously the notion that there's aging in bacteria." And if E. coli does get old, researchers could use it to study "how aging occurs and how it's regulated," Guarente adds, allowing them to get "right to the molecular heart of the matter."
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  9. #8  
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    hey it was interesting you know, and dont worry i've never told anyones secret and learn to keep a secret and though i'll admit it was a nice and informative reading for me

    dont mind my words, i'm a little humble, you know :wink: :wink: :wink:
    god made everyone in this world to learn and explore new things..
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