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Thread: Sleep cycle and wake time

  1. #1 Sleep cycle and wake time 
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    Does the time in which a person is woken during their sleep cycle affect how tired they feel when they are awake?


    JA Cambece
    JA Cambece Law Office
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  3. #2  
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    I propose you do an experiment and find out.
    All you need is a stick - to poke/wake people with.

    (I know this is a dumb/useless response .. but i just couldn't help myself )


    It is not so much that I have confidence in scientists being right, but that I have so much in nonscientists being wrong. --- Isaac Asimov
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  4. #3 Re: Sleep cycle and wake time 
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    Quote Originally Posted by cambece
    Does the time in which a person is woken during their sleep cycle affect how tired they feel when they are awake?
    Yes it does. I believe I read before that an average deep-sleep cycle lasts for about 2-3 hours, then you become more "awake" for about an hour, after which you go back into deep-sleep. I think in a normal sleeping period people have like 2/3 of these cycles. If you are woken up right while you're sleeping rather deeply, expect to be half dead.
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  5. #4  
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    The latest info I have read indicates that we each need a certain amount of sleep - if you are deprived of any of it then you will not feel in good form, the more you are depived the worse it gets until your system has had enough and just switches off till you have caught up with every last second.
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  6. #5  
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    To add on to that statement: Different people need different hours of sleep. Some need only 5, others (like myself) feel utterly dead without 10-12 hours. I'm not sure if that's some sort of sleeping disorder or not.
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  7. #6  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeremyhfht
    To add on to that statement: Different people need different hours of sleep. Some need only 5, others (like myself) feel utterly dead without 10-12 hours. I'm not sure if that's some sort of sleeping disorder or not.
    I'm the same way. If I don't get at least 9 and a half hours of sleep I feel tired the next day. It also seems to depend how I wake up (by alarm or something else).
    JA Cambece
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  8. #7  
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    Very much so and I, like a great many men, suffer from such a condition. It's called Obstructive Sleeep Apnoea and, at it's extreme end is life threatening.
    One reason it's rarely diagnosed is that the men who suffer from it are often just written off as lazy husbands.

    What actually occurrs is that the person relaxes so heavily, as they enter the deep sleep cycle, that their onw throat muscles collapse and they start choking. This normally tirggers an alarm in the brain which jolts them almost awake bu not enough to actually be aware that they have woken up.
    200 such seizures a night is not uncommon.

    The symptoms of this sleep deprivation are both fatigure and a foul temper.

    There is a cure, (not funded by any medical benifits scheme) which is a little radical. A snug mask, like an anethetic mask is worn, on the face and hooked to a pressure pump which, quite litterally, blows the throat apart like a balloon.
    Don't be afraid of asking stupid questions. They are so much easier to handle than stupid mistakes
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  9. #8  
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    Eh, I don't have it.

    >>
    Common Signs and Symptoms

    (The signs and symptoms that follow apply to both adults and children suffering with sleep apnea)

    Additional signs of obstructive sleep apnea include restless sleep, and loud snoring (with periods of silence followed by gasps). Other symptoms are non-specific: morning headaches, trouble concentrating, irritability, forgetfulness, mood or behavior changes, increased heart rate, anxiety, depression, increased frequency of urination, bedwetting, esophageal reflux and heavy sweating at night.
    <<

    ^ a quote from wikipedia. I hold none of the symptoms. For further study: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep_a...pnea_.28OSA.29

    Ironically, my father has half of those signs. Hah
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