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Thread: Respiration help plzzz

  1. #1 Respiration help plzzz 
    blx
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    Does anyone know anything about the science of the effect of temperature on the rate of respiration of oraganisms. I am doing an investigation to try to prove that maggots wriggle more at high temperatures due to higher rates of respiration.

    Any help would be really appreciated! :-D


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    I know that bacteria tend to slow down as it gets colder, that's why we use a freezer... Does that give you a glue?

    Sounds like a homework question...


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    Forum Freshman adamd164's Avatar
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    Enzymes are involved heavily in Respiration and are highly sensitive to temperature changes. The slightest change in temperature can dramatically affect turnover number.
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    Forum Freshman adamd164's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Megabrain
    I know that bacteria tend to slow down as it gets colder, that's why we use a freezer... Does that give you a glue?

    Sounds like a homework question...
    Yes, bacterial growth and reproduction decreases due to their enzymes being affected by the temperature change.
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    Forum Freshman Draculogenes's Avatar
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    however humans wriggle (shiver) more when it's cold... you're screwed :P
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    That shows a certain ignorance of the mechanism of shivering which is to exercise the muscles in order to keep the temperature up.
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    enzymes normally work at specific tempatures.

    mammels evolved to be fit to keep a constent tempeture (eg hair or the above mentioned shivering.)

    if tempature incresses , the reaction may speed up slightly(but not much or any at all?) but once any of the many enzymes becomes deformed due to high tempature, respiration stops.
    Stumble on through life.
    Feel free to correct any false information, which unknown to me, may be included in my posts. (also - let this be a disclaimer)
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    Forum Freshman adamd164's Avatar
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    Yes, enzymes are deactivated by low temperatures, and Bacteria will resume reproducing as normal if the temperature increases, but they are denatured by high temperatures, which is irreversible.
    Knowledge of evolution may not be strictly useful in everyday commerce. You can live some sort of life and die without ever hearing the name of Darwin. But if, before you die, you want to understand why you lived in the first place, Darwinism is the one subject that you must study.

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  10. #9  
    Forum Freshman Draculogenes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Megabrain
    That shows a certain ignorance of the mechanism of shivering which is to exercise the muscles in order to keep the temperature up.
    you seem to be incapable of reading between the lines.

    You said humans shiver to get the temp up. this is true. when it gets hot, our metabolism slows and we move less. Rates of respiration would most likely be higher when it's cooler, since we need to expend much more energy to keep warm.

    anyway...as for the actual chemical reaction speeding up in higher temps...it may happen. But wriggling would be the cause of "respiration going up", not "respiration going up" be the cause of wriggling.
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    Very good, go to the top of the class, freeze or boil anything it stops working.
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  12. #11 Re: Respiration help plzzz 
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    Quote Originally Posted by blx
    Does anyone know anything about the science of the effect of temperature on the rate of respiration of oraganisms. I am doing an investigation to try to prove that maggots wriggle more at high temperatures due to higher rates of respiration.

    Any help would be really appreciated! :-D

    i guess, it is obvious that the more a living organism moves in any type of environment specially at high temperatures, the more the rate of respiration increases. (just an opinion)
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  13. #12 Re: Respiration help plzzz 
    Forum Freshman adamd164's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hannah
    i guess, it is obvious that the more a living organism moves in any type of environment specially at high temperatures, the more the rate of respiration increases. (just an opinion)
    Not true, enzymes are VERY specific and will not work at all (or very little) at high temperatures. Respiration is highest in a human, for instance, when the body is maintained at 37°C.

    All organisms have to try to spend their lives within the suitable conditions for their enzymes.
    Knowledge of evolution may not be strictly useful in everyday commerce. You can live some sort of life and die without ever hearing the name of Darwin. But if, before you die, you want to understand why you lived in the first place, Darwinism is the one subject that you must study.

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