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Thread: Measurements:Increase In Girth And Weight in Gravid Corucia

  1. #1 Measurements:Increase In Girth And Weight in Gravid Corucia 
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    LEEWAY CORUCIA RESEARCH CENTER (LCRC)


    Courtesy of Polyphemos


    MEASUREMENTS ON INCREASE IN GIRTH AND WEIGHT IN THE SCINCIDAE SPECIES: Corucia zebrata (underlined)

    Brian L. Schnirel & Sherri L. Jones
    LEEWAY CORUCIA RESEARCH CENTER (LCRC)
    Blenheim, S.C. 29516

    __________________________________________________ ____________


    ABSTRACT:

    Measurements between non gravid and gravid individuals of female Corucia zebrata (underlined) were taken and compared to gain a perspective of girth increase and weight of this Scincidae species.


    KEY WORDS:

    Corucia, Girth, Matrotrophy, Viviparous, Weight.



    INTRODUCTION:

    Corucia zebrata (underlined) is a large herbivorous Scincidae species oocupying a high canopy arboreal niche (Schnirel, 2004). This species reproduces by viviparous matrotrophy with the birth of a large (usually single)neonate after a 7.5 month gestation period. Occasionally twins are produced with a single report of a set of triplets (Langerwerf,2003). The neonate shortly after birth consumes the placenta and then will not eat again until day three. Corucia zebrata possess a rarity in the reptile world. They have a reptilian social order or Circulus. Crocodilians are also often very social as well with a Circulus Structure (Mohapatra, 1976).
    Not only the parents, but other members of the Corucia Circulus will guard and nuture the young. In addition, introduced young will be adopted and raised. Due to the great genetic investment for a generally single youngster after a long gestation period, this species is hard wired to give any Corucia young top priority.



    RESEARCH:


    Girth Measurements:

    Background:

    Several Corucia were selected with approximately the same SVL (snout to vent length) and LOA (length overall). This was deemed necessary for accurate proportional measurements.


    Method:

    Girth measurements were conducted along the following guidelines. The location for the area of Girth measured was based on one quarter distance of the length (straight length as in all Corucia measurements) from the rear to front appendages. The one quarter distance from the rear legs was the location for the girth measurement.


    Girth Size:

    Non gravid
    173 mm


    Gravid
    200 mm


    (Based on an average of 22 common Solomon monkey skinks -Corucia zebrata zebrata{underlined}. Grvid females were tested at latter stages of pregnacy 6-7.5 months. All females gave birth to singletons. SVL = 260-270 mm LOA = 560-580 mm).


    Weight:

    Non-Gravid
    413.90 Grams


    Gravid
    535.81 Grams

    (Based on an average of 22 common Solomon monkey skinks- Corucia zebrata zebrata {underlined}. Gravid females were tested at latter stages of pregnancy 6-7.5 months. All females gave birth to singletons. SVL=260-270 mm LOA = 560-580 mm).


    DISCUSSION:


    Girth measurements show an average of a 15.5 % increase in size in the Gravid females tested. Weight measurements show an average of a 23% increase in the gravid females tested.



    REFERENCES:


    Bustard H.R.;
    Moharana S.; 1985. Captive Breeding of the Gharial (Gavalis Gangeticus {underlined}).
    ASRA the Journal of the association for the study of reptilia and
    Amphibia 2(4): 23-45

    Coburn John; 1996. Prehensile tailed skinks. T.F.H. Publications Inc. Neptune City,
    New Jersey, U.S.A.

    DeVosjoli, Phillippe; 1993. The general care and maintainence of prehensile tailed skinks.
    Advanced Vivarium Systems Inc., Lakeside, California, U.S.A.
    57 pages.

    Hausechild; Gabner; 1999. Corucia zebrata (underlined): Der Wickelschwanz skink.
    Natur and Tier, Munster, Germany. 79 pages.

    Jones, Sherri L.;
    Schnirel, Brian L.; 2006. Subspecies comparison of the Genus: Corucia. Polyphemos,
    Volume 4, Issue 1, May, Florence, South Carolina, U.S.A.
    pp. 1-25

    Langerwerf, Burt 2003. Agama International; Personal Communication.

    Schnirel, Brian L. 2004. SENI biometric analysis on the extinct Scincidae species:
    Macroscincus coctei. (underlined) Polyphemos, Volume 2,
    Issue 1, May, Florence, South Carolina, U.S.A. pp. 12-22.


    It is our hope that this will be of benefit to those working with Corucia.

    Sincerely,
    Brian L. Schnirel
    LCRC


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  3. #2  
    Forum Professor captaincaveman's Avatar
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    I used to keep these years ago, among about 50-60 other types of reptile, We know them as monkey tailed skink in uk. Not many captive bred ones about now. Interesting line of work

    I mainly keep small and medium pythons now but am considering returning to dwarf monitors also, mainly spiney tailed and peacock


    CAPTAINCAVEMAN


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  4. #3  
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    Hello,

    Thanks for writing. Monkey tailed is also used on occasion in the states.

    Good luck with your monitors. We do not have them but Sherri is into Tegus.

    Sincerely,
    Brian
    LCRC
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  5. #4  
    Forum Professor captaincaveman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian - LCRC
    LEEWAY CORUCIA RESEARCH CENTER (LCRC)


    Hello,

    Thanks for writing. Monkey tailed is also used on occasion in the states.

    Good luck with your monitors. We do not have them but Sherri is into Tegus.

    Sincerely,
    Brian
    LCRC

    our local breeders got argentinan black and white tegus, i used to re-home unwanted bosc monitors and had a white throat too, now that was a monster


    I really love my pythons, got loads of different royals(ball pythons to you guys :wink: )got standards, jungle, pastels and one piebald. Also got a gree tree python which can be a handful(avoided emerald tree boas though)

    My real love is Inland carpet pythons and have promised myself a diamond at some point, but not many in UK captive market and also want a black headed python and possibly a woma(when i can afford them)

    My wifes loves her uromastyx(think the other names dab lizard or spiney tailed) and we got a couple of ornate ones, then my kids have corn snakes

    We love our reptiles
    CAPTAINCAVEMAN


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  6. #5  
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    LEEWAY CORUCIA RESEARCH CENTER (LCRC)




    Hello Again,


    Of Boas and Pythons, I have a special attraction to Carpet pythons.

    Sherri and I have a pair of Mali Uromastyx.

    Sincerely,

    Brian
    LCRC[/b]
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  7. #6  
    Forum Professor captaincaveman's Avatar
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    My carpets like this, same colour and similar markings, but i haven't got any descent pics of her yet

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  8. #7 Carpet python photo 
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    Nice looking snake Captain.

    Thanks for the pic.

    Brian
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