Notices
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Photosynthesis energy sources...

  1. #1 Photosynthesis energy sources... 
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    36
    Question: plants receive energy from the Sun's light to photosynthesize and produce energy. However, what kinds of other light could plants use to photosynthesize? Artificial light? Different colored lights [meaning, their pigments/coloring would need to change to utilize this energy source?] And most importantly, though the light given off by bioluminescent animals/fungi is very weak and probably not strong enough, could plants photosynthesize this light, assuming they had enough of it and their pigments/coloring were adapted to it?
    Thanks!


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Forum Isotope
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Western US
    Posts
    2,640
    Quote Originally Posted by MrPiano View Post
    Question: plants receive energy from the Sun's light to photosynthesize and produce energy. However, what kinds of other light could plants use to photosynthesize? Artificial light?
    It's not a question of natural vs. artificial -- photons are photons are photons. As long as the wavelengths are correct, and you have enough photons to photosynthesize at the desired rate, you'll get the job done.

    The best wavelengths are blue/violet and red. Green plants are green because they reflect (i.e., don't absorb) that color.

    Different colored lights [meaning, their pigments/coloring would need to change to utilize this energy source?]
    Just get the right colors (see above).

    And most importantly, though the light given off by bioluminescent animals/fungi is very weak and probably not strong enough, could plants photosynthesize this light, assuming they had enough of it and their pigments/coloring were adapted to it?
    Again, the colors just have to be right, and you just need the source to be bright enough.


    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope skeptic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    4,843
    Bioluminescence is much, much too weak.

    Most artificial lights are the wrong wavelengths, but daylight bulbs are available and will be quite sufficient for growing green plants if enough are used.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    36
    Quote Originally Posted by skeptic View Post
    Bioluminescence is much, much too weak.

    Most artificial lights are the wrong wavelengths, but daylight bulbs are available and will be quite sufficient for growing green plants if enough are used.
    Thanks. How is the strength of light measured? Is it called intensity?... Just so I can look up the relative strengths of natural vs. artificial vs. bioluminescent..
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope skeptic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    4,843
    A basic unit is the lumen. This converted to lux when expressed per square metre. One lux is one lumen per square metre.

    Example : Overcast day might have 1,000 lux.
    A very bright sunny day might have 100,000 lux.

    That should give you an idea of how much light is needed, since plants can continue photosynthesizing on cloudy days, and some can photosynthesize underwater, where light intensity is even lower.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    36
    Quote Originally Posted by skeptic View Post
    A basic unit is the lumen. This converted to lux when expressed per square metre. One lux is one lumen per square metre.

    Example : Overcast day might have 1,000 lux.
    A very bright sunny day might have 100,000 lux.


    That should give you an idea of how much light is needed, since plants can continue photosynthesizing on cloudy days, and some can photosynthesize underwater, where light intensity is even lower.
    Thanks, this helped the most. If anyone knows the amount of lux given off by bioluminescent fungi, fireflies [etc.] let me know! I've been looking online but can't find it... though I'm guessing its very low.
    Reply With Quote  
     

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 4
    Last Post: September 13th, 2012, 04:25 AM
  2. Replies: 0
    Last Post: October 4th, 2011, 03:38 PM
  3. Renewable energy sources are useless... or not ?
    By Makandal in forum Environmental Issues
    Replies: 35
    Last Post: July 11th, 2011, 01:52 AM
  4. Energy for Photosynthesis
    By numbers in forum Biology
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: October 16th, 2008, 07:14 AM
  5. Replies: 4
    Last Post: May 22nd, 2006, 12:42 PM
Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •