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Thread: Genes causing death?

  1. #1 Genes causing death? 
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    I was looking aroiund on the NCBI database and decided to check out the human genome. when i found a gene called AMID that has a name apoptosis which is death inducing. does this mean that the gene is responsible for death? would we live longer with out it? i need a little clarity any would be much appreciated.


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    You'll need an expert to answer that question..
    But in my opinion, death has little to do with apoptosis.
    Death is the inability of producing energy to keep cells alive as a whole, preceded by a mitosis reduction.
    The body gets tired and tired until it colapses, it doesn't disappear.


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    Death is the inability of producing energy to keep cells alive as a whole, preceded by a mitosis reduction.
    its not that, it has suffient energy to keep going for quite sometime. its simply that according to evoultion it is not profitble to spend so much energy on continiusly repairing the cells to perfect conditions all the time. Its better reparing them suffient long to get a child and then die. and to even speed this process up nature have evolved systems to make the cells die and the organism so its offsprings get a chance. so i think the possebility of a gene doing death is very plausible. its already known taht the cell has suecide genes. and also parts telling it to die after X mitioses
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zelos
    Death is the inability of producing energy to keep cells alive as a whole, preceded by a mitosis reduction.
    its not that, it has suffient energy to keep going for quite sometime. its simply that according to evoultion it is not profitble to spend so much energy on continiusly repairing the cells to perfect conditions all the time. Its better reparing them suffient long to get a child and then die. and to even speed this process up nature have evolved systems to make the cells die and the organism so its offsprings get a chance. so i think the possebility of a gene doing death is very plausible. its already known taht the cell has suecide genes. and also parts telling it to die after X mitioses

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  6. #5  
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    could you then find these genes and modify them, causing people to live longer by making the gene think the cell will die after 20X more mitosis.
    or does it have to do with the Surface area of that cell not being as productive?
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  7. #6  
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    Apoptosis is the cellular process of programmed cell death. This is not destructive cell death (necrosis), it is a very ordered process whereby the cell gradually 'dismantles' itself and recycles its contents to surrounding cells.

    Sometimes during the life of an organism it is necessary to kill some of its own cells, an example during development is the loss of a tadpoles tail as it matures into a frog. In adults if a cell undergoes a threshold level of damage (for example UV irradiation from the sun which could lead to cancer) certain molecules within that cell decide that it is too risky to attempt to repair the damage and so the process of apoptosis is initiated, to preserve the health of the organism as a whole.

    To date no genes have ever been identified whose primary purpose is too terminate the life of an organsim. I doubt that we ever will find any such genes.
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    There is no gene that causes an organism to die. In perfect conditions, any animal or plant could live significantly longer than in the wild (although general wear-and-tear on the body will cause it to degenerate).

    There is no gene that makes something die because there is simply no selective pressure for such a gene and if there was, there would be no way for natural selection to go back a generation and say "even though this organism has already reproduced, it lacks the 'die now' gene so its offspring are out."

    Cells stop replicating in most cases after a set number of replications to prevent cancer and other problems from developing...cells will also die at specific times as needed (apoptosis is well documented as a natural process written into an organism's genetic code).

    General cell death does contribute to organism death, and programmed apoptosis can be held off by making the body decide that it is more important to save the cell than to just let it slide--usually by inducing minor amounts of stress (animals fed less can live significantly longer even though they may not be able to reproduce due to their lack of food).

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    good answers, thanks.
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    Load of crap! - Proof - I'm Still here!!!!

    And will be for at least another 250 years! Somebody has got to break the 200 year Barrier - and I've selected me for it!
    ever heard of genetic variation?
    but there is proof for me bieng right. if it were proffitble to make the cells perfect condition they would. wich isnt
    I am zelos. Destroyer of planets, exterminator of life, conquerer of worlds. I have come to rule this uiniverse. And there is nothing u pathetic biengs can do to stop me

    On the eighth day Zelos said: 'Let there be darkness,' and the light was never again seen.

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  11. #10 Truth & Research 
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    Apoptosis is cell mediated-death. The gene is THEORETICALLY suppose to induce this cell death causing aging and eventually death. Many scientists also believe that cells accumulate so much damage that a person will eventually die (drinking, manual labor, diseases, etc.). I myself theorize that DNA is incapable of replicating itself so many times throughout its existence, if you don't die of old age, it is something else like a disease or physical trauma.
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    I myself theorize that DNA is incapable of replicating itself so many times throughout its existence
    You're thinking of telomeres. They're repeating sections of genetic material at the end of DNA strands. Every time the DNA is replicated, a short section of telomere is lost. The countdown begins....

    There is a lot of research going on into the connections between telomeres and aging. Cancer as well.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telomeres
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  13. #12  
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    No.

    I forgot how to copy a person's message!! Could someone tell me how to?

    I already know about telomeres diminishing as they copy! I theorize that DNA itself, within in particular cells, cannot copy itself correctly to survive beyond 70-100 years (depending on the individuals gentic makeup).

    Let's say that the gene that codes for the replication of enzymes responsible for genetic replication. The next cell or cell generation would not be able to copy itself correctly.
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    Without genes like this people would most certainly DIE SOONER!!!!

    Apoptis is involved in programmed cell death - you have to understand that the cell "kills itself" only when it is favorable to do so. If this process did not occur, then there would be a buildup of cells with dangerous mutations, perhaps have a virus, etc.
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    Quote Originally Posted by God
    No.

    I forgot how to copy a person's message!! Could someone tell me how to?

    I already know about telomeres diminishing as they copy! I theorize that DNA itself, within in particular cells, cannot copy itself correctly to survive beyond 70-100 years (depending on the individuals gentic makeup).

    Let's say that the gene that codes for the replication of enzymes responsible for genetic replication. The next cell or cell generation would not be able to copy itself correctly.
    I take it that you are unaware of the mutliple complex processes by which cells 'proofread' replicated DNA to identify and fix errors. Stem cells are theoretically immortal, they can replicate themselves forever.

    Also regarding telomere shortening during DNA replication: we have a special enzyme called telomerase. This enzyme contains a short single-stranded DNA template of the telomere repeat which it uses to add more telomere sequence to the end of chromosomes. Therefore under normal circumstances telomeres are never fully eroded.

    PS GOD: if you want to copy a person's message use the 'quote' button at the top right of each members post
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zelos
    but there is proof for me bieng right. if it were proffitble to make the cells perfect condition they would. wich isnt
    Something doesn’t necessarily happen just because it’s evolutionarily advantageous. It would certainly be very advantageous if we had the cellulase enzyme that would allow us to eat wood or grass, but we don’t.
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  17. #16  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scifor Refugee
    Something doesn’t necessarily happen just because it’s evolutionarily advantageous. It would certainly be very advantageous if we had the cellulase enzyme that would allow us to eat wood or grass, but we don’t.
    Thats an interesting point actually. No mammals at all have a cellulase gene so evolution of one would have been very unlikely in humans anyway. Cellulase is expressed by bacteria which live in a symbiotic relationship with ruminant mammals. The interesting question is not 'why haven't we evolved a cellulase gene?' but 'why haven't all mammal species developed such a symbiotic relationship with cellulose-degrading bacteria?'
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  18. #17  
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    Maybe we should turn around the statement a bit. Are there genes that increase longevity?

    Yes.

    Especially in Drosophila research there is quite an extensive body of work that deals with this question. And there is not one single answer. Many ways lead to increased longevity.

    For instance:
    -selection for later reproduction.
    -selection for increased resistance to starvation and desiccation stress.

    And at the same time not all genetic changes that increase the resistance to these stresses result in an increased longevity.
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