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Thread: virus

  1. #1 virus 
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    does a virus contain vitamins or minerals? thanks


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  3. #2  
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    Good question!


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  4. #3  
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    Good question! I also would like to know.
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  5. #4  
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    A virus is a protein that is a linear polymer chain of amino acids. And an amino acid is a "vitamin".
    It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.
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  6. #5  
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    No.
    Viruses are obligate pathogens.
    They contain only such genes and proteins as are required to permit them to be successful pathogens. Not useful vitamins and minerals.

    Some bacteria, though, manufacture vitamins. Some of these dwell in the human gut and are useful because of those byproducts.
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  7. #6  
    Forum Professor Zwolver's Avatar
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    Skeptic, don't put that off that easily.

    Many virusses contain parts of the bacteria or human they infected themselves. So no, not only infective parts are insulated inside the virus.

    Secondly, yes, a virus may contain minerals and or vitamins. Because a virus is simply enclosed inside the cytosol, and may, or will contain other parts of it. A virus "dies" when dried up. Well, most virusses die when dried up, as their proteins will never get the shape they need to enter the cell. Even, some virusses (can't think of any right now) use cofactors to introduce their DNA into the host, which can be a protein that is only activated by a mineral or a vitamin contained in the host. Though a virus can't contain much, i believe 12.000 bases is the top for most virae. Unknown though is if the virus is simply none infective, or that the cell is WAY better at detecting them.
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
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  8. #7  
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    Viral genomes, like all known genomes, contain phosphorus. Phosphorus is a dietary mineral.
    Magnesium ions help to stabilise the packaged viral genome inside the capsid. Magnesium is a also a dietary mineral.



    @pyoko
    Amino acids don't count as vitamins I'm afraid, even though some of them are essential dietary components.
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  9. #8  
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    I wouldn't count phosphorous as a mineral, but magnesium yes. I didn't know it was used by the virus, i thought it was simply a remaining fraction from the cells translation proces.
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
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  10. #9  
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    If it's not CHNO it's regarded as a mineral. Phosphorus is actually one of the more important ones, a so-called macromineral (as opposed to trace mineral).
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  11. #10  
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    Since the phosphorus and magnesium are not used or usable by the host, I think they have to be excluded as useful minerals.
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  12. #11  
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    sorry, but both are used by the host. Without magnesium your polymerase won't work, and without phosphorous, you won't have ATP..
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
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  13. #12  
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    The DNA/RNA will be digested into its component nucleotides and recycled into many pathways. Any ions bound to that nucleic acid will also be used since they are essential cofactors in many biochemical pathways.
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  14. #13  
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    Some viral capsid proteins also have bound calcium ions.
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  15. #14  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zwolver View Post
    sorry, but both are used by the host. Without magnesium your polymerase won't work, and without phosphorous, you won't have ATP..
    Yes, but with the exception of tiny, tiny amounts from the accidental death of the virus, viral phosphorus and magnesium are not a source of those minerals for the host. Phosphorus and magnesium come from food, not from infection.
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  16. #15  
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    The question posed by the OP is not asking if viruses are important sources of minerals and vitamins for the host, but whether they contain any vitamins and minerals. Nobody here is suggesting that virus particles are a major source of minerals in any meaningful way (I hope).
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  17. #16  
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    Well, Zwirko, you may be correct.

    I read the OP as a query into whether viruses could contribute vitamins or minerals. If not in a meaningful amount, then why ask the question? The answer is no. Anything a virus might contribute is present in such tiny trace amounts, that it is meaningless.

    In fact, most of the phosphorus and magnesium present in the viruses come from the host anyway.
    Last edited by skeptic; July 1st, 2012 at 08:10 PM.
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  18. #17  
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    Maybe the OP was wanting a yes/no answer for a homework question? Anyways, I learned a lot from the discussion. Thanks!
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  19. #18  
    Forum Professor Zwirko's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skeptic View Post
    ... then why ask the question?.
    I don't know. They get weirder and weirder as the months go by.


    To wander completely from the OP myself: I would speculate that there are organisms that make a living, at least in part, from consuming viruses. Probably marine. Maybe some small filter feeders that exploit the incredible density of viral particles in marine waters. Or maybe some very small single-celled eukaryotes. Just guessing, no examples to offer.
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  20. #19  
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    thank you
    Last edited by kellbrook; July 2nd, 2012 at 01:52 AM.
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  21. #20  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zwirko View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by skeptic View Post
    ... then why ask the question?.
    I don't know. They get weirder and weirder as the months go by.


    To wander completely from the OP myself: I would speculate that there are organisms that make a living, at least in part, from consuming viruses. Probably marine. Maybe some small filter feeders that exploit the incredible density of viral particles in marine waters. Or maybe some very small single-celled eukaryotes. Just guessing, no examples to offer.
    I don't think there could be an energy efficient way to use virusses to get extra energy, it would take to much organels to safely harvest them. Maybe some bacteria use virusses to fend off competitors though. They would contain the virus in a lysogenic cycle, but initiating lytic cycle in all other organisms they are compatible with.

    Also virusses contain valuable DNA which can be implemented for an advantage to the cell, if used correctly.
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
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  22. #21  
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    How do virus die? I mean... they didn't reproduce and don't breath or eat anything, so what it meant when a virus die?? what happen to them?
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  23. #22  
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    Quote Originally Posted by msafwan View Post
    How do virus die? I mean... they didn't reproduce and don't breath or eat anything, so what it meant when a virus die?? what happen to them?
    someone mentioned some kind of protein damage or change
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  24. #23  
    Forum Professor Zwolver's Avatar
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    A virus "dies" when it's capsin (envelop), it's tail, or it's content become damaged to much so it can no longer preform as a vector. Damage means damage by dehydration, solvent, toxin, heating, uv, other radiation, etc.
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
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