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Thread: Fast Plant Growth Planet?

  1. #1 Fast Plant Growth Planet? 
    Forum Cosmic Wizard icewendigo's Avatar
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    If there was a somewhat earth-like planet, on which plants grew considerably faster than they do on earth (like bamboo does maybe), what kind of differences in this planets conditions (atmosphere, climat, etc) would make such a scenario easier to imagine?


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    Forum Bachelors Degree dmwyant's Avatar
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    Well, first your planet will need An atmosphere with a heavy Co2 content however eventually you will have a planet with an oxygen rich environment. Such an environ would see insects of greatly increased size. Examples can be found from the carboniferous period of our own planet in the form of giant dragonflies and scorpions reaching lengths up to a meter. The greater your oxygen content the bigger your insects. If you look up info on the Carboniferous period you may get a good idea regarding atmospheric conditions and such. Thunderstorms would be especially devastating with the increased O2 content. Lightning striking a heavy pocket of O2... BOOM... Hehehe


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  4. #3  
    WYSIWYG Moderator marnixR's Avatar
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    C3 plants appear to respond better to increased CO2 levels by growing faster

    Biodiversity (C3 vs C4 Plants) -- Summary

    however, faster growth could also mean that less nutrients are incorporated in the plants structure, since the uptake of minerals through the roots does not increase with increased CO2 in the atmosphere
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  5. #4  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard icewendigo's Avatar
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    Current atmosphere is about 78% Nitrogen, 21% oxygen and 0.04% CO2

    What would happen if the earth had lets say 60% nitrogen, 35% oxygen, 8% CO2, and 1% methane

    Would humans survive without breathing gear and masks?

    If you stepped out of a spaceship onto such a planet would you notice the difference and start caupghing or could you not notice that theres more oxygen and CO2?
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  6. #5  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard spuriousmonkey's Avatar
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    Adaptation to increased levels of CO2 occurs in humans. Continuous inhalation of CO2 can be tolerated at three percent inspired concentrations for at least one month and four percent inspired concentrations for over a week. It was suggested that 2.0 percent inspired concentrations could be used for closed air spaces (e.g. asubmarine) since the adaptation is physiological and reversible. Decrement in performance or in normal physical activity does not happen at this level.[80][81]However, it should be noted that submarines have carbon dioxide scrubbers which reduce a significant amount of the CO2 present.[82]
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  7. #6  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard icewendigo's Avatar
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    Great stuff spruiousmonkey! I wonder if great concentrations of oxygen could offset the effects of continuous CO2 inhalation. Otherwise its better to have not much more than 2 percent CO2, I guess its more than plants usually get on earth in wilderness conditions.
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    Quote Originally Posted by icewendigo View Post
    Current atmosphere is about 78% Nitrogen, 21% oxygen and 0.04% CO2

    What would happen if the earth had lets say 60% nitrogen, 35% oxygen, 8% CO2, and 1% methane

    Would humans survive without breathing gear and masks?

    If you stepped out of a spaceship onto such a planet would you notice the difference and start caupghing or could you not notice that theres more oxygen and CO2?
    35% oxygen would mean unstoppable fires, which is why the Earth has probably never had much over 25% or so at any time in its history.
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  9. #8  
    Forum Bachelors Degree dmwyant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by icewendigo View Post
    Great stuff spruiousmonkey! I wonder if great concentrations of oxygen could offset the effects of continuous CO2 inhalation. Otherwise its better to have not much more than 2 percent CO2, I guess its more than plants usually get on earth in wilderness conditions.
    If this is an entirely different planet however lifeforms developing on it would adapt to the higher CO2 levels. You could actually decrease oxygen levels to something like Earth normal and the various animal life could have some sort of built in CO2 scrubber.
    Last edited by dmwyant; May 27th, 2012 at 08:49 AM. Reason: typo
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  10. #9  
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmwyant View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by icewendigo View Post
    Great stuff spruiousmonkey! I wonder if great concentrations of oxygen could offset the effects of continuous CO2 inhalation. Otherwise its better to have not much more than 2 percent CO2, I guess its more than plants usually get on earth in wilderness conditions.
    If this is an entirely different planet however lifeforms developing on it would adapt to the higher CO2 levels. You could actually decrease oxygen levels to something like Earth normal and the various animal life could have some sort of built in CO2 scrubber.
    My understanding is that CO2 kills via 2 pathways; oxygen displacement and ph flux. So long as you have a balanced amount of sodium bicarbonate ions in your bloodstream you should be fine up to a level at which other physiological systems are being messed around with, ex: too much extra sodium will screw around with your blood pressure and nervous system.

    So to speak animals do have this built in co2 scrubber and hypothetically a animal could adapt to tolerate very high levels of Co2.

    Back to the original question: low gravity, high atmospheric pressure, high CO2, high O2, high N2, Warm, wet, and sunny, with a highly evolved symbiotic ecosystem which somehow excludes organisms which predate on the plants.
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  11. #10  
    Forum Professor Zwolver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thevillageidiot View Post
    Back to the original question: low gravity, high atmospheric pressure, high CO2, high O2, high N2, Warm, wet, and sunny, with a highly evolved symbiotic ecosystem which somehow excludes organisms which predate on the plants.
    Low gravity, in combination with high atmospheric pressure. Can't be done.

    You say the plants have to grow fast, but, do they have to be recognisable as plants? As i can comprehend a "black algae" that absorbs all light, and converts sunlight much more effectively. It simply uses pigments to generate an electric potential, which makes it able to defend itself, while fotosynthesis gives the plant energy. Having an interwater layer, (low floating clouds) where these algae can float on directly. So it would be a dark planet with dark electric filled clouds, but full of algae life. These would be able to reproduce at petridish speeds, at all times, volcanoes and fires generate CO2 and other elements where these clouds feed on.

    I kind of wonder what other life could be there...
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
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  12. #11  
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    since you bring up volcanic activity, that would bring in a large heat energy source that would help it grow(plants grow slowly in arctic, lightning speed at equator. from this i come to that assumption.) along with a large amount of fuel to make food in bulk. but one other factor is light. what is the intensity of light form the sun?it could be really close to its parent star, but it could be really dim. or is it farther away from the really bright star? it would be really cold in that case. besides- volcanic activity doesn't mean heat(i.e: Ganymede). i think there are too many factors here to determine.

    yes. i DO over-analyze. your welcome.
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  13. #12  
    New Member corwinlame's Avatar
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    Growing plants is best way to increase the plants in your garden.You have to use some best technology for growing plant and make best planet. Now a days many growth techniques, some seeds also available for growing plants.
    Latest led grow lights.
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  14. #13  
    Administrator KALSTER's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spuriousmonkey View Post
    Adaptation to increased levels of CO2 occurs in humans. Continuous inhalation of CO2 can be tolerated at three percent inspired concentrations for at least one month and four percent inspired concentrations for over a week. It was suggested that 2.0 percent inspired concentrations could be used for closed air spaces (e.g. asubmarine) since the adaptation is physiological and reversible. Decrement in performance or in normal physical activity does not happen at this level.[80][81]However, it should be noted that submarines have carbon dioxide scrubbers which reduce a significant amount of the CO2 present.[82]
    ...................
    And here I was thinking he had been killed in a lab explosion or something...
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  15. #14  
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    Lumping all plants together is problematic
    eg: in this hot dry summer, we had a record plum and apple harvest, meanwhile, row crops suffered
    heavy CO2 favors some trees like oaks, but hits the upper limits of available nitrogen in the pines, while locust trees do not have that problem.

    what works great for a polar bear ain't ideal for a lemur

    at a bare minimum, expect a very different mix of plant species
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