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Thread: neural tissue

  1. #1 neural tissue 
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    could u plz explain abt the neural tissue


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  3. #2  
    Forum Masters Degree invert_nexus's Avatar
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    Sure.
    Neural tissue is composed of neurons.

    Anything else?

    (It should be noted that the brain is not composed entirely of neurons. In fact, neurons are far outnumbered by glial cells which are now thought to be more important to cognition than was once considered to be the case.)


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  4. #3 Re: neueal tissue 
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    Quote Originally Posted by hindu
    could u plz explain abt the neural tissue
    They are an essential part of all higher forms of life.
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    Forum Freshman SinMan's Avatar
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    Demaged neurons are not replaced by new ones. Thats why is brain demage irriversible. And that is also why brain tumors are almost never the cause of cancer neurons, but other cells.
    Q:What's better than being perfect? A:Accepting yourself!
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  6. #5  
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    Neural tissue is specialized for the conduction of electrical impulses that convey information or instructions from one region of the body to another. About 98% of neural tissue is concentrated in the brain and spinal cord, the control centers for the nervous system.

    Neural tissue cell types

    * Neurons transmit signals as electrical charges which affect their cell membranes. A neuron has a cell body (soma) that contains a nucleus. The stimulus that results in the production of an electrical impulse usually affects the cell membrane of one of the dendrites, which then eventually travels along the length of an axon, which can be a meter long. Axons are often called nerve fibers with each ending at a synaptic terminal.
    * Neuroglia are cells of the CNS and PNS that support and protect the neurons. They provide the physical support for neural tissue, as well as maintaining the chemical composition of the tissue fluids and defending the tissue from infection.

    Parts of Nerve Tissue (part – structure – function)

    * Neuron (nerve cell)
    - cell body - contains the nucleus – regulates the functioning of the neuron
    - axon – cellular process (extension) – carries impulses away from the cell body
    - dendrites – cellular process (extension) – carries impulses toward the cell body
    * Synapse – space between axon of one neuron and the dendrite or cell body of the next neuron – transmits impulses from one neuron to the others
    * Neurotransmitters – chemicals released by axons – transmit impulses across synapses
    * Neuroglia – specialized cells in the CNS – forms myelin sheaths and other functions
    * Schwann cells – specialized PNS cells – forms the myelin sheaths around neurons

    Source: http://www.innvista.com/health/anatomy/neural.htm
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  7. #6  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
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    Very nice post VM. It's good to see someone taking the time to give a detailed reply to the opening question.
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  8. #7  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ophiolite
    Very nice post VM. It's good to see someone taking the time to give a detailed reply to the opening question.

    Don't we just love that dry sense of humour!

    "The Science forum without Ophiolite would be like life without time"
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  9. #8  
    Forum Masters Degree invert_nexus's Avatar
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    Demaged neurons are not replaced by new ones. Thats why is brain demage irriversible. And that is also why brain tumors are almost never the cause of cancer neurons, but other cells.
    This is actually a bit in the air right now. There are studies that indicate that new neurons are being grown and studies that indicate that they aren't being grown...

    Still need some time to get this worked out.
    I.e. Keep your dress on...

    * Neuroglia are cells of the CNS and PNS that support and protect the neurons. They provide the physical support for neural tissue, as well as maintaining the chemical composition of the tissue fluids and defending the tissue from infection.
    Again. Glial cells are now thought to be more involved in cognitive processes than the support role to which they were once relegated. It has been discovered that glial cells communicate with each other in a seperate network from the neural net. This form of communication is not as precise or as fast as neural communication. Calcium is the messenger and is allowed to diffuse over vast spaces rather than through synapses as in the neuron.

    Glial cells are able to control neural processes by affecting the synapse. By taking up certain neurotransmitters to prevent them from being taken up by the neuron, etc...

    This is all cutting edge stuff and is not entirely worked out at present.

    Again. Keep your dress on.

    Basically, that's the story of the brain altogether. Lots of stuff coming up. Paradigms are changing constantly. Brain science will be vastly different in a small number of years.

    Hopefully a successful science of mind will be birthed soon.

    It's good to see someone taking the time to give a detailed reply to the opening question.
    Vague questions...
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  10. #9  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ophiolite
    Very nice post VM. It's good to see someone taking the time to give a detailed reply to the opening question.
    You're welcome :)
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