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Thread: How much Chemistry in Neuroscience?

  1. #1 How much Chemistry in Neuroscience? 
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    To those who have studied neuroscience or are fairly familiar with Neuroscience, how much chemistry are involved in Neuroscience, percentage-wise?

    and how about other components like Psychology & Biology?you can fill other components and the percentage of content in if you think Iíve missed them out.thanks for your knowledge and feedback. cheers


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  3. #2  
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrsmile View Post
    To those who have studied neuroscience or are fairly familiar with Neuroscience, how much chemistry are involved in Neuroscience, percentage-wise?
    and how about other components like Psychology & Biology?you can fill other components and the percentage of content in if you think Iíve missed them out.thanks for your knowledge and feedback. cheers.

    Neuroscience
    1. the study of the anatomy, physiology, biochemistry and pharmacology of the nervous system

    Psychology
    1. the science of the mind or of mental states and processes.
    2. the science of human and animal behavior.
    3. the sum or characteristics of the mental states and processes of a person or class of persons, or of the mental states and processes involved in a field of activity

    www.dictionary.com

    I am not a neuroscientist but can tell you with some conviction that it would be difficult to accurately estimate the chemistry component of the field of neuroscience as a percentage. (And, potentially, pointless.. why do you wish to do this?). As a field of study, psychology is on the other end of the spectrum from neuroscience, if that makes any sense? Psychology could be seen as an emergent property of neuroscience. I.e. the way that neuronal networks are physically and structurally wired, rates of firing etc. may inform mechanisms underlying psychology. The reductionist approach is based on the premise that psychology can be better understood ultimately by studying neuroscience. It would therefore seem inappropriate to speak of psychology as a major component of neuroscience (this would be like 'the tail wagging the dog'). On the other hand, biology forms a major component of neuroscience. Note that there are not rigid boundaries between subjects in reality, we only really categorise for convenience; biochemistry, for example, underpins a lot of neuroscience.

    Best wishes,

    Tri~


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  4. #3  
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    I plan to major in Neuroscience while minoring in Psychology. By this statement of yours,

    "The reductionist approach is based on the premise that psychology can be better understood ultimately by studying neuroscience. It would therefore seem inappropriate to speak of psychology as a major component of neuroscience (this would be like 'the tail wagging the dog')",

    do you think I should major in Psychology and minor in Neuroscience, instead? but would that mean I might lack the laboratory work experience necessary to venture deeper into the biological basis of psychology?
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  5. #4  
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrsmile View Post
    I plan to major in Neuroscience while minoring in Psychology. By this statement of yours,

    "The reductionist approach is based on the premise that psychology can be better understood ultimately by studying neuroscience. It would therefore seem inappropriate to speak of psychology as a major component of neuroscience (this would be like 'the tail wagging the dog')",

    do you think I should major in Psychology and minor in Neuroscience, instead? but would that mean I might lack the laboratory work experience necessary to venture deeper into the biological basis of psychology?
    This is a decision that only you can make, and only you should make. Questions that might help in reaching the right decision: Which subject most interests you? In which field do you wish to work after graduation? Which of those subjects, as a major, would be most likely to help you progress into that field of work?

    Best wishes,

    Tridimity
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