Notices
Results 1 to 14 of 14
Like Tree1Likes
  • 1 Post By Harold14370

Thread: Why do we feel 37 deg C hot? when its most likely the most comfrtble

  1. #1 Why do we feel 37 deg C hot? when its most likely the most comfrtble 
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    13
    Why is it the most comfortable temperature is 22 to 26*C, and anything above 30C is hot when our body is 36*C


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    8,795
    Because metabolic processes generate heat within our bodies. To maintain a constant temperature, heat must be continually transferred to the environment, and this requires a temperature differential.


    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    13
    why becoz we release heat is 36C not comfy i stil dont understnd. many people live in 42C temps so lower envi is not a requirement
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    14,168
    We generate a given amount of heat in a given time. If we can lose this heat by 'regular' processes then we will feel comfortable. If heat loss is compromised by a small difference between our tempererature and ambient temperature, or if heat loss is inhibited by a higher ambient temperature, then we will feel uncomfortable. In these circumstances other processes will come into play - blood will be pumped towards the surface area of the body to increase heat loss; we will start to sweat to induce heat loss by evaporation. The feedback signals telling us this is happening we interpret as discomfort. If the temperature is too low then other processes come into play to increase heat generation, to offset the greater rate of heat loss - more muscular activity, either conscious and deliberate, or involuntary (shivering).
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    8,795
    Quote Originally Posted by q4agl View Post
    why becoz we release heat is 36C not comfy i stil dont understnd. many people live in 42C temps so lower envi is not a requirement
    Sweating can lower the temperature of the skin below ambient. There has to be a temperature differential between your body's core and the skin surface, or your core temperature will rise. This is just physics. If your body is producing heat, it must flow out of your body, or the temperature will rise. Heat flows from higher to lower temperature.
    msafwan likes this.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Geo
    Geo is offline
    Forum Junior
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    273
    Babies can survive immersion in near freezing water for hours. They don't sweat, and are good little heat retainers.

    Compare the physiology of an Inuit and a Kalahari Bushman.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7  
    Forum Masters Degree
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    703
    I agree, sweating is the reason we didn't feel hot in high ambient temperature. People in the desert sweat too: in fact they felt cooler because the dry air facilitate sweat drying (as long as they don't get the burn by the sun), but in contrast a cool shaded tropical forest is "HOT" because it is humid and prevent sweat from drying. In other word: sweat is very important and it is the reason we can tolerate high ambient temperature.

    P/S: and our skin is actually cooler than 37 degree Celcius... Maybe at about 28 degree Celcius...
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #8  
    WYSIWYG Moderator marnixR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Cardiff, Wales
    Posts
    5,810
    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by q4agl View Post
    why becoz we release heat is 36C not comfy i stil dont understnd. many people live in 42C temps so lower envi is not a requirement
    Sweating can lower the temperature of the skin below ambient. There has to be a temperature differential between your body's core and the skin surface, or your core temperature will rise. This is just physics. If your body is producing heat, it must flow out of your body, or the temperature will rise. Heat flows from higher to lower temperature.
    which is also one of the reasons why dry hot conditions are far more bearable than humid hot conditions - in the latter sweating doesn't work as well
    "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away." (Philip K. Dick)
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #9  
    Professor of Articulation Zesterer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    The fourth dimension, our universe, the milkyway, outer galactic spiral 8, the solar system, earth.
    Posts
    43
    Your body is used to an internal temperature of 37 degrees celsius. However, it is not used to an external temperature of 37 degrees - its optimum external temperature is about 23 degrees celcius - slightly over average room temperature.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  11. #10  
    Moderator Moderator
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    8,416
    Our bodies are accustomed to a pretty big comfort range. During the summer I was in Iraq, under conditions where I doing patrols several times a week overdressed in protective gear in 100+F weather my body became well acclimatized. When I worked out, 85F in the shade felt chilly and 75F (about 24C) was down right cold--too cold to wear just shorts and a T-shirt to work out in--until I got a mile or two into my runs. On the opposite end, when I working on fishing boats off the coast of Maine during the winter, most of us were quite comfortable into the low 60s. Most first world people don't know their potential to adjust to climate because our lives generally don't put enough stress on us to force that adjustment.
    Meteorologist/Naturalist & Retired Soldier
    “The Holy Land is everywhere” Black Elk
    Reply With Quote  
     

  12. #11  
    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    喫茶店
    Posts
    17,036
    Quote Originally Posted by Geo View Post
    Babies can survive immersion in near freezing water for hours.
    Don't try this at home.

    Isn't that more down to the diving reflex and the fact that the cold causes the body to shut down? Adults have also survived in similar circumstances.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  13. #12  
    Forum Sophomore Eversbane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Somewhere close by
    Posts
    142
    Quote Originally Posted by marnixR View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by q4agl View Post
    why becoz we release heat is 36C not comfy i stil dont understnd. many people live in 42C temps so lower envi is not a requirement
    Sweating can lower the temperature of the skin below ambient. There has to be a temperature differential between your body's core and the skin surface, or your core temperature will rise. This is just physics. If your body is producing heat, it must flow out of your body, or the temperature will rise. Heat flows from higher to lower temperature.
    which is also one of the reasons why dry hot conditions are far more bearable than humid hot conditions - in the latter sweating doesn't work as well
    Which is why the truism "It's not the heat, it's the humidity" is true.
    Nearly all of the above lines of evidence can be questioned, and all have more than one possible cause (although some may have no cause at all).
    Reply With Quote  
     

  14. #13  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    91
    Quote Originally Posted by Geo View Post
    Babies can survive immersion in near freezing water for hours.
    Lolz.

    'CAN survive' and 'are likely to survive' are not the same thing, and the later is not true with regards to your statement.

    If anything, the reason why babies MIGHT have a better survival rate compared to adults is because there is less mass to cool, so the body cools faster, which seems to be one of the factors that determines the survivability in near-drownings. Babies cool faster than adults.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  15. #14  
    New Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    2
    Think about turning on a stove burner that heats up to 200°C when the room temperature is the same as the burner? It would just keep getting hotter and hotter because that heat has nowhere to go!
    Reply With Quote  
     

Similar Threads

  1. Can you feel X rays?
    By Jon889 in forum Health & Medicine
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: June 22nd, 2011, 01:33 AM
  2. something I feel
    By allenyuang in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: May 28th, 2010, 04:41 AM
  3. I feel like a dumbass
    By Faron in forum Mathematics
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: January 19th, 2008, 02:07 AM
  4. I feel so embarrassed
    By streamSystems in forum Personal Theories & Alternative Ideas
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: October 1st, 2007, 06:15 AM
  5. What do you feel about your life?
    By anandsatya in forum Philosophy
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: January 11th, 2006, 08:07 AM
Tags for this Thread
37*

View Tag Cloud

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •