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Thread: *NEW* I can feel x-rays!

  1. #101  
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    Telling someone to be open minded is often a round-about way of telling them they are supposed to agree.
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  2. #102  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neverfly View Post
    Telling someone to be open minded is often a round-about way of telling them they are supposed to agree.
    I agree, hence why I deliberately (re-)used the term.
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    Warning, this contains a long rant.

    Here's another theory, the 'Rogue Waves' theory.

    Let's pretend that you really can't feel x-rays, but you *can* feel rays of other frequencies.

    Maybe the x-rays are 'contaminated' with rays of other frequencies because of imperfections in the way that the rays are generated. The waves might sometimes add up, or subtract from, each other, by merging with each other, by being not lined up exactly in line with each other. So you might sometimes have waves with frequencies that are much longer, or amplitudes that are much higher, than the average x-rays in the beam.

    It's like Rogue Waves on the ocean. This is interesting to read about. Sometimes, on the ocean, there will be just one huge gigantic enormous skyscraper-sized wave that will suddenly appear and totally destroy a ship that was sailing. People have reported this happening many times, but nobody believed them, and now people are able to sometimes see the waves using modern technology, like satellites and other things that can look at the ocean constantly. So now they are finding out that these rogue waves are real, and they happen when waves gather together and 'add up' somehow. It's on wikipedia and other websites where they talk about it.

    So maybe the x-rays have 'rogue waves' mixed in, and maybe you're able to feel those larger, longer waves even if you can't feel x-rays (but actually, I don't doubt that it's probably possible to feel the x-rays too, I'm just saying).

    Whenever people make lasers, they make them so that the beam will be as 'pure' as possible, with all the waves lined up in the same direction, but maybe in an x-ray machine, it's not as pure.

    I think that maybe you feel the x-rays interacting with your electromagnetic fields. Electromagnetic waves can trigger your nerve cells to fire. The argument then becomes: do x-rays interact with electromagnetic fields generated by the human body?

    Also, it is untrue that the x-rays don't interact with the matter in your body at all. If they didn't interact with you at all, then you wouldn't be able to see any images on the x-rays. The different types of tissue *absorb* x-rays, more or less, depending on the type of tissue it is.

    Several years ago, we had a hypnotist who did a demonstration at our school. I tried, and tried, and tried, and tried, but as hard as I tried, I was totally unable to get hypnotized, and I could not go along with the audience and the other people who were all easily falling asleep and having their arms float up involuntarily and all the other amazing things that were happening to them. Even when I really *wanted* to be hypnotized and experience imaginary physical sensations, I could not. I tried and tried afterwards to do it to myself alone, and even in a perfectly quiet place with earplugs in my ears, I could not hypnotize myself. So, I am very skeptical if anybody ever tells me that my mind is imagining physical sensations that are not real. I would *love it* if my brain were capable of making me feel imaginary physical sensations. I'd hypnotize myself and go have fun in a fantasy world like all those people in the online forums who talk about the stuff they do in their lucid dreams, but alas, I can't do it, and I'm missing out on all the fun. Whenever I feel a physical sensation, it's not imaginary.

    I'm very sensitive whenever somebody says 'You can't feel that, it's just your imagination,' because I, too, have had bad experiences with the medical industry and doctors, like some other people in this thread (@macadi63) and I really appreciate it when people are willing to say 'Something is unexplained and we don't understand it yet' rather than just 'That's not possible, end of story.'

    My medical experience: In about 1999 my then-boyfriend and I both got some kind of illness that caused digestive problems and severe, incapacitating fatigue. It lasted for several weeks. For him, it went away. For me, it did not. The worst of it was over in about a month, but I had lingering symptoms. I kept going and going and going... for months.... I couldn't eat properly and I lost a lot of weight. I looked like a skeleton.

    I went to several doctors. The first thing they did was try to give me a prescription for Prevacid, an antacid. My problem was not merely 'too much stomach acid for no reason at random.' My problem was complicated. I had the feeling that I couldn't swallow food. I would eat only a little, and feel like I was going to throw up. I refused the prescription for Prevacid.

    I was paying for these doctor visits myself, so I spent thousands of dollars going to the doctor and having tests done. All of them told me that nothing was visibly wrong. Nobody could figure out what to do.

    Nobody even thought to ask me the commonsense question, 'What are you eating?' Not a single doctor asked me what I was eating every day and whether I was eating anything unusual that I hadn't been eating before. I made some changes in my diet, did some troubleshooting, and found out that I was getting sick from drinking the milk that came from a particular local dairy, which I had not been drinking in the past. The milk tasted fresh and delicious, but for some unknown reason, it irritated my stomach and caused me to be sick all day long after drinking it. It came in glass bottles, and I think maybe the glass bottles weren't being washed well enough on the inside. I would get sick the same way if I drank from other types of bottles over and over again without washing them, like a reused water bottle.

    So, I solved the problem by myself, after spending thousands of dollars on doctors who wouldn't even ask commonsense questions, but just wanted to prescribe an unnecessary and harmful pill which would have caused even more side effects - getting rid of all your stomach acid is *really* bad for you, and it allows the Helicobacter Pylori bacteria to grow freely inside your stomach, which causes ulcers, and it also prevents you from digesting your food, which causes malnutrition. If I had gotten ulcers and become malnourished, I would have then needed to go back to the doctors again and again to get even more medical treatments for the ulcers and malnourishment and overall ill health. One pill leads to another.

    I've had several other doctor experiences that were very similar to that one. I tried Prozac for depression, and it gave me *horrible* side effects that I won't even go into - you can google 'prozac' and just read the long list of side effects that it causes, and guess that I had a whole bunch of them. It was intolerable, and totally unexpected: My doctor DIDN'T WARN ME that there would be horrible side effects. When I went back to him and asked him about those horrible side effects (after having quit the drug because I just could not tolerate it at all), he told me:....

    'Oh, I didn't tell you about the side effects, because I was afraid that you might IMAGINE THAT YOU WERE HAVING THEM if you knew to expect them.'

    That's right. He didn't warn me about the side effects, because I might *imagine* that I was having those side effects if he warned me about them. Oh my gosh! I might imagine side effects, and THAT would have been DISASTROUS! Apparently, the HUGE DANGER that I might 'imagine' side effects was ABSOLUTELY UNTHINKABLE! We must prevent imaginary side effects AT ALL COSTS, even at the risk of somebody having REAL side effects that were totally unexpected that they weren't prepared for! Real side effects are much less dangerous than imaginary ones! Can you even fathom this distorted, twisted line of thought? I can't.

    So that is why I react very irritably whenever anybody says, 'You're just imagining physical sensations that aren't there.' I have a long history of conflicts with people who told me this. I can't be hypnotized, so I can't trick my brain into feeling imaginary sensations even if I am trying as hard as I can to do that on purpose.
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    Suddenly, I'm thinking that 'Bones Absorb X-Rays' is something that we should all be saying 'Duh!' about. Of course x-rays interact with bones. Bones absorb x-rays. What happens to the energy of the x-ray after it gets absorbed by a bone? It goes somewhere and does something. How does that energy get dissipated by the bone after it's absorbed? Energy has to change into some other kind of energy. Does it change into heat, vibration, electrical currents? What does the energy change into?

    Here is a pdf that talks about how x-rays interact with the body.

    http://epswww.unm.edu/xrd/xrdclass/02-Rad-Safety.pdf

    A quote from Wikipedia, which says that you can actually *see* x-rays, too:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X-ray

    "Visibility

    While generally considered invisible to the human eye, in special circumstances X-rays can be visible. Brandes, in an experiment a short time after Röntgen's landmark 1895 paper, reported after dark adaptation and placing his eye close to an X-ray tube, seeing a faint "blue-gray" glow which seemed to originate within the eye itself.[80] Upon hearing this, Röntgen reviewed his record books and found he too had seen the effect. When placing an X-ray tube on the opposite side of a wooden door Röntgen had noted the same blue glow, seeming to emanate from the eye itself, but thought his observations to be spurious because he only saw the effect when he used one type of tube. Later he realized that the tube which had created the effect was the only one powerful enough to make the glow plainly visible and the experiment was thereafter readily repeatable. The knowledge that X-rays are actually faintly visible to the dark-adapted naked eye has largely been forgotten today; this is probably due to the desire not to repeat what would now be seen as a recklessly dangerous and potentially harmful experiment with ionizing radiation. It is not known what exact mechanism in the eye produces the visibility: it could be due to conventional detection (excitation of rhodopsin molecules in the retina), direct excitation of retinal nerve cells, or secondary detection via, for instance, X-ray induction of phosphorescence in the eyeball with conventional retinal detection of the secondarily produced visible light.

    Though X-rays are otherwise invisible it is possible to see the ionization of the air molecules if the intensity of the X-ray beam is high enough. The beamline from the wiggler at the ID11 at ESRF is one example of such high intensity.[81]"



    Last edited by longhairlover; January 22nd, 2013 at 10:53 PM.
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  5. #105  
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    Quote Originally Posted by longhairlover View Post
    Suddenly, I'm thinking that 'Bones Absorb X-Rays' is something that we should all be saying 'Duh!' about. Of course x-rays interact with bones. Bones absorb x-rays. What happens to the energy of the x-ray after it gets absorbed by a bone? It goes somewhere and does something. How does that energy get dissipated by the bone after it's absorbed? Energy has to change into some other kind of energy. Does it change into heat, vibration, electrical currents? What does the energy change into?

    Here is a pdf that talks about how x-rays interact with the body.

    http://epswww.unm.edu/xrd/xrdclass/02-Rad-Safety.pdf

    A quote from Wikipedia, which says that you can actually *see* x-rays, too:

    X-ray - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    "Visibility

    While generally considered invisible to the human eye, in special circumstances X-rays can be visible. Brandes, in an experiment a short time after Röntgen's landmark 1895 paper, reported after dark adaptation and placing his eye close to an X-ray tube, seeing a faint "blue-gray" glow which seemed to originate within the eye itself.[80] Upon hearing this, Röntgen reviewed his record books and found he too had seen the effect. When placing an X-ray tube on the opposite side of a wooden door Röntgen had noted the same blue glow, seeming to emanate from the eye itself, but thought his observations to be spurious because he only saw the effect when he used one type of tube. Later he realized that the tube which had created the effect was the only one powerful enough to make the glow plainly visible and the experiment was thereafter readily repeatable. The knowledge that X-rays are actually faintly visible to the dark-adapted naked eye has largely been forgotten today; this is probably due to the desire not to repeat what would now be seen as a recklessly dangerous and potentially harmful experiment with ionizing radiation. It is not known what exact mechanism in the eye produces the visibility: it could be due to conventional detection (excitation of rhodopsin molecules in the retina), direct excitation of retinal nerve cells, or secondary detection via, for instance, X-ray induction of phosphorescence in the eyeball with conventional retinal detection of the secondarily produced visible light.

    Though X-rays are otherwise invisible it is possible to see the ionization of the air molecules if the intensity of the X-ray beam is high enough. The beamline from the wiggler at the ID11 at ESRF is one example of such high intensity.[81]"



    Nice one!
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  6. #106  
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    Quote Originally Posted by longhairlover View Post
    Several years ago, we had a hypnotist who did a demonstration at our school. I tried, and tried, and tried, and tried, but as hard as I tried, I was totally unable to get hypnotized, and I could not go along with the audience and the other people who were all easily falling asleep and having their arms float up involuntarily and all the other amazing things that were happening to them. Even when I really *wanted* to be hypnotized and experience imaginary physical sensations, I could not. I tried and tried afterwards to do it to myself alone, and even in a perfectly quiet place with earplugs in my ears, I could not hypnotize myself. So, I am very skeptical if anybody ever tells me that my mind is imagining physical sensations that are not real. I would *love it* if my brain were capable of making me feel imaginary physical sensations. I'd hypnotize myself and go have fun in a fantasy world like all those people in the online forums who talk about the stuff they do in their lucid dreams, but alas, I can't do it, and I'm missing out on all the fun. Whenever I feel a physical sensation, it's not imaginary.
    If you're still interested in this I could offer some other tips which I have discovered by accident.

    The first is sitting insight (Vipassanā) mediation. A lot of people experience sensations while doing this, and few are the same. Simply sit comfortably, and straight, and count to ten over and over while paying attention to the sensations of the breath (stomach, back of the throat, nostrils, whatever). It's not easy, but with practice you may find yourself in some pretty weird states of mind. Like running, anything under twenty to thirty minutes is just warming up.

    The second one is drinking (good quality) tea before sleeping. Chemicals certainly have different effects on people so I've no idea if this works for anyone but myself. I used to not notice any effects of tea on my sleep, but after drinking nothing else but tea (literally) for about a year I started getting sleep paralysis and lucid dreams, sometimes ten to fifteen times a night. Now I can induce them intentionally with tea drinking and fatigue. The first time feels like you've been possessed, and you may feel compelled to confess your sins, but once you get used to it you can play around with it.

    -edit-
    It seems some people require fancy expensive drugs to reach altered states of mind. Some don't.
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    Yeah, I found out that Vipassana is the name of the meditation that I was already doing. I had read about meditation a long time ago, and started doing it by myself, just observing my physical sensations while meditating. Unfortunately, some of the things that I have observed and experienced while meditating are the reason why this particular thread interested me. I do have unusual, and unwanted, experiences that disturb my meditation.
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  8. #108  
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    I tried, and tried, and tried, and tried, but as hard as I tried, I was totally unable to get hypnotized
    And that is exactly why you were not hypnotised. If you had just relaxed and "gone with it" you probably would have been. Some people are very susceptible, some less so.

    I'm very sensitive whenever somebody says 'You can't feel that, it's just your imagination,'
    NOBODY SAID THAT.

    I am very sensitive about people twisting what has been said to suit their own agenda.

    The placebo effect is not "just your imagination", it is a real effect.
    Psychosomatic diseases are not "just your imagination", they are real and can be debilitating.
    Phantom limb pain is not "imaginary", it is real pain.
    Those people who think they get sick when a Wi-Fi router is on are not using their "imagination"; they really feel it (even if the router is not powered on!)

    'Oh, I didn't tell you about the side effects, because I was afraid that you might IMAGINE THAT YOU WERE HAVING THEM if you knew to expect them.'
    Yes. It is known as the nocebo effect. It is a real effect and can cause unpleasant side effects. So, if there was a chance that the number of people having side effects could be reduced by not telling them, is it right not to warn them? I don't know. It is a difficult ethics question.

    If only 1 in 1,000 will experience the side effects but that rises to 10 in 1,000 if they are told about them, then maybe it is better not to tell them. If 900 per 1,000 will experience the side effects, then they should probably be warned.

    But as all medicines can have side effects I'm not sure it is necessary to warn every person for every possible medication. People should know that already. And they should ask. Also, in this country at least, all medicines come with documentation explaining what they are for, who should and should not take them, possible side effects, etc. So stop trying to put the blame on other people.

    So that is why I react very irritably whenever anybody says, 'You're just imagining physical sensations that aren't there.'
    Nobody here said that. OK? Which is why I react very irritably when you and others make this claim.
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  9. #109  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Strange View Post
    I am very sensitive about people twisting what has been said to suit their own agenda.
    Even when they were not aware they were doing so, right?
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    I just realized my dad was a retired radiologist. I forgot all about that. Duh, yes, I forgot about my own dad. I just now sent him an email asking him what he thinks about people being able to feel a strange sensation while being x-rayed.
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    I have some doubts re people feeling the actual Xrays, but it is highly possible that you might have sensations generated by secondary effects of the process. The Xray projector no doubt generates significant static electricity when in operation. It also generates heat, sound at various frequencies, and quite possibly a draft of air. I have seen Xray machines that had an incandesent light bulb in the projector head in order to give the operator a visual guide to where the Xray was focusing. I have seem some that had cooling fans in the projector head as well. It is very possible to "feel something' without this being evidence of feeling the x rays. This is why double blind studies are so important.
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    We can all feel X-rays when the x-ray source is powerful.
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  13. #113 I also recently feel my xray! 
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    I recently signed up here also to join the thread regarding feeling an xray. I had back surgery years ago and was In having some check up xray done, iI've had dozens before on my back over the years and have never felt anything. But this time I had three or four xray done and felt as I would describe and a very lite breeze or a puff or air hitting me each time I had an xray, I wasn't told to hold my breath or given any other sign of when the xray was done I just knew from the feeling I had. I'm not here to convince any none believers I myself know what I felt and wanted to inform others who feel this may have happened to them that their not alone!
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    I am 66 years old and have had well over 200 x-rays on all parts of my body. Yesterday I had a series of x-rays for my lower back. When the x-ray was taken with me standing and facing the machine, three times, I most definitely felt a puff of air as described many times above.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrMike View Post
    I am 66 years old and have had well over 200 x-rays on all parts of my body. Yesterday I had a series of x-rays for my lower back. When the x-ray was taken with me standing and facing the machine, three times, I most definitely felt a puff of air as described many times above.
    Cooling fan within the machine. jocular
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  16. #116 "Seeing" X-Rays 
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    No one seems to have considered this: Many compounds fluoresce under the influence of X-Rays. Fluoroscope screens are/were coated with a compound known as Barium Platinocyanide. It's possible certain compounds within some individuals' eyes, though in very minute quantity, could fluoresce, thus explaining the claims made way back in Roentgen's time. jocular
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    X-Rays are generated using electromagnetic coils. These coils can generate electromagnetic fields. In older devices these EM fields will be less shielded, and thus capable of forming a field outside the X-Ray generator. The sensation you are feeling is like that of holding a static balloon close to your body. Well slightly different because of the field strength and because this EM radiation field is a lot wider.

    In short, you don't feel the X-Rays, you feel the static the electromagnetic field creates on your skin.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zwolver View Post
    X-Rays are generated using electromagnetic coils. These coils can generate electromagnetic fields. In older devices these EM fields will be less shielded, and thus capable of forming a field outside the X-Ray generator. The sensation you are feeling is like that of holding a static balloon close to your body. Well slightly different because of the field strength and because this EM radiation field is a lot wider.

    In short, you don't feel the X-Rays, you feel the static the electromagnetic field creates on your skin.
    Not all therapeutic X-Ray production is done through use of transformers, and hence, not all involve EM radiation. However it is certainly true that static charges may be symptomatically felt by the skin. jocular
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  19. #119  
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    Quote Originally Posted by jocular View Post
    Not all therapeutic X-Ray production is done through use of transformers, and hence, not all involve EM radiation. However it is certainly true that static charges may be symptomatically felt by the skin. jocular
    But surely all X-ray generators involve accelerating electrons in an electromagnetic field and slapping them into a target (is this correct? I can't think of any other way of doing it). If this is correct, all X-ray generators will have a strong EM field.
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  20. #120  
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhDemon View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by jocular View Post
    Not all therapeutic X-Ray production is done through use of transformers, and hence, not all involve EM radiation. However it is certainly true that static charges may be symptomatically felt by the skin. jocular
    But surely all X-ray generators involve accelerating electrons in an electromagnetic field and slapping them into a target (is this correct? I can't think of any other way of doing it). If this is correct, all X-ray generators will have a strong EM field.
    I was thinking of the therapeutic isotopes which emit gamma radiation, often considered to be short-wavelength X-Rays, but perhaps in all clarity, gamma is not "X-Ray". Sorry if I was being misleading. joc
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  21. #121 I felt it too!!!! 
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    Nick...i registered just so i could reply to your message. I wondered if anyone else had a similar experience. So i put my question on the web. The first entry i read cited a doctor's opinion that what the person felt was imagined, in so many words. I knew that couldn't be true because i know what i felt was real. Last summer, i broke my kneecap. Everytime I went near a doctor, I got at least four xrays. Over the course of five months I know I had at least twenty xrays, in sets of four usually. It was during the last few xrays sets that I began experiencing the weird sensation in my knee. It was sort of like a magnetic "wave" moving across my knee. It's hard to explain how it felt.I don't know if it was because i had so many in such a short time on the same spot or if there is some other explanation. It kind of scared me though so I actually refused the xrays a few times. I just think it was excessive to have that many done in such a short time, especially with all the stuff you hear about cancer.I hope you get to read this so you know you're not alone. I'm glad to know I'm not crazy lol. And I hope you made a good recovery. Thanks for posting.
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  22. #122  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carly View Post
    It was sort of like a magnetic "wave" moving across my knee.
    Explaining what x-rays feel like by saying they feel like magnetic waves?

    *sigh*
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  23. #123  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carly View Post
    I knew that couldn't be true because i know what i felt was real.
    If objective testing tells us anything, is is that this statement has little value.

    Of course what you felt was real. You felt it.

    That doesn't mean that what you felt was X-rays. For example, there are people who are made ill by Wi-Fi signals. Their feeling is real - they [U]really do feel ill[U]. But the fact they feel this way has nothing to do with Wi-Fi (as objective testing can show).
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    Quote Originally Posted by longhairlover View Post
    Suddenly, I'm thinking that 'Bones Absorb X-Rays' is something that we should all be saying 'Duh!' about. Of course x-rays interact with bones. Bones absorb x-rays. What happens to the energy of the x-ray after it gets absorbed by a bone? It goes somewhere and does something. How does that energy get dissipated by the bone after it's absorbed? Energy has to change into some other kind of energy. Does it change into heat, vibration, electrical currents? What does the energy change into?
    Usually an X-Ray detector only detects rays of a very specific wavelength, this is the wavelength emitted by the X-Ray tube. However, when irradiating Bones, another frequency of radiation of the electrons that fall back in their orbital emerges. I'm to lazy to go check what kind of wavelengths calcium can emit (i actually checked it anyway), but i'm guessing it is still X-Rays, however the detector can't see these lower energetic X-Rays, thus you see dark. So yeah, i bet a part of the energy is changed into heat, and most of the energy is changed into other X-Rays..


    In this graph, calcium emits wavelengths about 3.700 KeV, and about 4.000 KeV. (The second one is a possible double hit with an X-Ray or electron before it could discharge its own X-Ray, so it got double charged, and also emitted another wavelength). The particle/wave used to hit the calcium was probably 15 KeV in energy, as this usually is the case for lighter elements, like calcium.
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
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    Honestly, I am 99% sure that this was no placebo. I would be willing to prove it to.
    How can you do that since you are the only one "feeling" the sensation so no one else can scientifically observe what you feel.
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    Wow, this thread is from 2011.

    I wonder if the OP is the same person who can see UV light?
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  27. #127  
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    Does this sort of mega-thread resurrection occur often around here?

    In tangentially related news: I really dislike all these mismatched socks lying around...
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  28. #128  
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    Well, you can search topics on their tags. So when a new member searches the web for their subject, they may find it due to the tags, join for that topic, and respond to it. However, they don't care it's old.. And we still answer to it ..
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
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    I experienced this "burst of energy" or "puff of air" today when x-rays of my spine were taken from the front. The machine was about 1m away from my body and I experienced a strange sensation when the x-ray was taking the image. I wasn't sure if it was the gown blowing against my skin due to the static or what, but I felt the puff / energy and asked the radiographer what it was and she said she'd never heard of anything like that.

    It made me curious so I found this forum on the front page of google.

    I'm leaning towards the static / electromagnetic theory as when I was removing the gown to change back in to my regular clothes, the gown made a lot of static noise and reacted with my hair, I could feel the charged particles. Also I saw what looked like a giant battery cylinder that took some sort of liquid, that was driving the machine.
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  30. #130  
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    Okay, let me be straight. The amount of energy absorbed by radiation in joule is pretty small. 1 Joule per kilogram, is immense, and will kill you, however it will not be detectable in your body. So the x-rays themselves could not have created that kind of static charge. What you felt was a static charge, created by the coil of the machine to accelerate the electrons.
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
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  31. #131  
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    Quote Originally Posted by paulgnz View Post
    I'm leaning towards the static / electromagnetic theory ...
    The "like" function isn't working so: welcome, and thanks for a rational post on the subject! (I'm still torn between psychosomatic and some real static/electric field effect.... Or perhaps a combination: heightened sensitivity caused by expecting to feel something?)
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    Strange thread but I think the OP is correct in that X-rays cause a very faint sensation, especially on the face e.g.dental x-rays.

    If you search for X-rays + tingling + sensation in Google you will see it has been discussed quite often.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robittybob1 View Post
    If you search for X-rays + tingling + sensation in Google you will see it has been discussed quite often.
    I did that, just now, in google. First link was this thread... Also, another link mentioned slight warmth from the visible light the machine produces. This makes sense to me.

    This is a very old thread...
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaBOB View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Robittybob1 View Post
    If you search for X-rays + tingling + sensation in Google you will see it has been discussed quite often.
    I did that, just now, in google. First link was this thread... Also, another link mentioned slight warmth from the visible light the machine produces. This makes sense to me.

    This is a very old thread...
    It could be the warmth too, but I have felt something when having dental x-rays, and if it was just the light I think I would have noticed the sensation at times prior to the dentist leaving the room. I didn't have time to read many of the search findings myself.
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  35. #135  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robittybob1 View Post
    It could be the warmth too, but I have felt something when having dental x-rays, and if it was just the light I think I would have noticed the sensation at times prior to the dentist leaving the room. I didn't have time to read many of the search findings myself.
    Yeah, so what? There are many anecdotal reports and precious little science. Opinions don't count much.

    Given what is known about human senses, the most likely explanation is static electricity. Anyone who is old enough to have owned a crt color television (or computer monitor) should be well familiar with the readily sensible effects they generate. Before fantasising about extrasensory phenomena, one needs to preclude explanations of that sort.
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    Quote Originally Posted by tk421 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Robittybob1 View Post
    It could be the warmth too, but I have felt something when having dental x-rays, and if it was just the light I think I would have noticed the sensation at times prior to the dentist leaving the room. I didn't have time to read many of the search findings myself.
    Yeah, so what? There are many anecdotal reports and precious little science. Opinions don't count much.

    Given what is known about human senses, the most likely explanation is static electricity. Anyone who is old enough to have owned a crt color television (or computer monitor) should be well familiar with the readily sensible effects they generate. Before fantasising about extrasensory phenomena, one needs to preclude explanations of that sort.
    When you are sitting in the dental chair you don't get much opportunity to run experiments, you just notice that you feel something when the x-ray machine is on. What it is I don't know for sure, but I did feel something, on more than one occasion, and I think that is all that I can claim at this stage.
    So I'm not fantasizing about anything, please.
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  37. #137  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robittybob1 View Post
    When you are sitting in the dental chair you don't get much opportunity to run experiments, you just notice that you feel something when the x-ray machine is on. What it is I don't know for sure, but I did feel something, on more than one occasion, and I think that is all that I can claim at this stage.
    So I'm not fantasizing about anything, please.
    I am drawing an inference based on what you've written. Your reluctance to accept mundane explanations is well documented here, Robittybob. I am simply drawing the attention of other readers to the fact that there's a rational order in which a proper investigation should proceed. And that protocol does not place extrasensory perception at the top of the list.

    That is all.
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  38. #138  
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    Quote Originally Posted by tk421 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Robittybob1 View Post
    When you are sitting in the dental chair you don't get much opportunity to run experiments, you just notice that you feel something when the x-ray machine is on. What it is I don't know for sure, but I did feel something, on more than one occasion, and I think that is all that I can claim at this stage.
    So I'm not fantasizing about anything, please.
    I am drawing an inference based on what you've written. Your reluctance to accept mundane explanations is well documented here, Robittybob. I am simply drawing the attention of other readers to the fact that there's a rational order in which a proper investigation should proceed. And that protocol does not place extrasensory perception at the top of the list.

    That is all.
    Just very lightly touching my checks they seem very sensitive to touch, so could the x-rays have ionized the hair and make it move with very slight electrostatic forces? In fact it is similar feeling to bringing electrostatic material near your face. So I'm not saying it was extrasensory but sensory. The x-rays or x-ray machine does something that enables one to feel them/it that is all.
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    Quote Originally Posted by cosmictraveler View Post
    Honestly, I am 99% sure that this was no placebo. I would be willing to prove it to.
    How can you do that since you are the only one "feeling" the sensation so no one else can scientifically observe what you feel.
    It would be like a hearing test - there would have to be a correlation between the signal and the response.
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  40. #140  
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    ~ Without having a full comprehensive test of equipment I can not agree that you are feeling the x-ray..
    That you may well ( as have I ) feel some sensation of the event.. Is it heat or microwave leakage ?
    I have worked with radio astronomy and can say I have felt things I do not think I should have..
    A concentration of electron., magnetic energies can effect the near to them fields.. We have a leakage detector that sounds a warning as some of this stuff is VERY harmful. That alarm has never sounded.. yet we do feel. I liken it to a static charge.. They can knock you over.. ZAP !
    On this one.. I agree with Bob..
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    I can also feel x-rays. Next time I go to the dentist I want to do an experiment to prove that I can feel it. I was just telling my coworker randomly about this and I figured it was normal for everyone to feel it. When he said he never feels it then i started searching and found this forum. I feel it in my brain. Its a weird feeling. Its kinda of hard to explain but i always cringe at the dentist waiting for the x-ray machine to turn on. It makes my eyes water. Its good to know I'm not the only one that has experienced this.
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  42. #142  
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonathoncroft View Post
    I can also feel x-rays. Next time I go to the dentist I want to do an experiment to prove that I can feel it. I was just telling my coworker randomly about this and I figured it was normal for everyone to feel it. When he said he never feels it then i started searching and found this forum. I feel it in my brain. Its a weird feeling. Its kinda of hard to explain but i always cringe at the dentist waiting for the x-ray machine to turn on. It makes my eyes water. Its good to know I'm not the only one that has experienced this.
    You should read the thread to see what the explanation is.
    But that explanation doesn't - and can't - apply to you.
    There are no nerve endings in the brain itself. You can't feel anything in your brain. (We know this from the fact that brain surgery can be preformed while the patient is conscious and they feel no sensation during the procedure)
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  43. #143  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dywyddyr View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by jonathoncroft View Post
    I can also feel x-rays. Next time I go to the dentist I want to do an experiment to prove that I can feel it. I was just telling my coworker randomly about this and I figured it was normal for everyone to feel it. When he said he never feels it then i started searching and found this forum. I feel it in my brain. Its a weird feeling. Its kinda of hard to explain but i always cringe at the dentist waiting for the x-ray machine to turn on. It makes my eyes water. Its good to know I'm not the only one that has experienced this.
    You should read the thread to see what the explanation is.
    But that explanation doesn't - and can't - apply to you.
    There are no nerve endings in the brain itself. You can't feel anything in your brain. (We know this from the fact that brain surgery can be preformed while the patient is conscious and they feel no sensation during the procedure)
    What feeling was he feeling? Surgery would be possible as there might be no pain receptors but was he talking about pain? I don't think so.
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    yesterday, I too felt an x ray. Twice, actually as I had 2 x ray's. The nurse and dr had never known of anyone feeling x ray's before. The nurse ask what it felt like. I told her it felt like wind. (It was also warm)
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  45. #145  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bev110 View Post
    I told her it felt like wind. (It was also warm)
    It was probably a warm wind.
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  46. #146  
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    Had the nurse eaten beans recently?
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    Possibly the X-Ray machine was so old, that it used a capacitor that heats up. Without proper unsulation you could feel the heat from the capacitor, if this is close enough, or the wind is right. So this could be possible..
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
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  48. #148  
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    the people that cleared Chernobyl reported, that they felt the intense radiation
    it felt like a myriad of needles on there faces, and it tasted like metal in there mouths.
    .... most of them died short after....

    on top of a mountain, if you turn your head up and close your eyes and its dark.
    You can see flashes. That is the cosmic radiation that goes trough your eye balls.

    So, if some people can sense the X-rays or radio waves, for what ever reason, is not so far fetched...
    Last edited by Quantum immortal; August 23rd, 2014 at 11:21 AM. Reason: add cosmic radiation
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  49. #149  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Quantum immortal View Post
    the people that cleared Chernobyl reported, that they felt the intense radiation
    it felt like a myriad of needles on there faces, and it tasted like metal in there mouths.
    .... most of them died short after....

    So, if some people can sense the Xrays or radio waves, for what ever reason, is not so far fetched...
    How is being able to feel a massive dose of lethal radiation (or the effects of such a dose) the same as being able to detect x-rays from a dental exam? I could feel it if I put my head in the microwave, but that doesn't mean I can intercept cell phone calls with my brain.
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    it's not straight forward, that we can sense intense radiation.
    This is why i mention the examples (i edited after you posted)

    So it's not inconceivable, that some people are sensitive enough to sense low doses....
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  51. #151  
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    What aspect of our biology allows for sensing low levels of x-rays? Do these people have some kind of special organ or a reaction to this low level of radiation that the rest of us lack? Simply being "sensitive enough" is too vague to describe what you suggest is happening.
    "Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." -Calvin
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  52. #152  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    What aspect of our biology allows for sensing low levels of x-rays? Do these people have some kind of special organ or a reaction to this low level of radiation that the rest of us lack? Simply being "sensitive enough" is too vague to describe what you suggest is happening.
    we didn't evolve to sense radiation. This also means, that we didn't evolve to avoid interference from radiation either.
    If some percentage of the population has some weird physiological reaction, that stimulates nerves. There was no reason for natural selection to select against that. In contrast, we evolved to take in to account that there is light around us. Porphyria is a disease, where haemoglobin react like chlorophyll when illuminated, and bad things happen. If there was no sun, natural selection would have no reason to select against pophyria.

    The physiological reaction that sensibilises to radiation could be anything.

    All this is speculative. What i want to say, it's that it's a reasonable theory.
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  53. #153  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Quantum immortal View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    What aspect of our biology allows for sensing low levels of x-rays? Do these people have some kind of special organ or a reaction to this low level of radiation that the rest of us lack? Simply being "sensitive enough" is too vague to describe what you suggest is happening.
    we didn't evolve to sense radiation. This also means, that we didn't evolve to avoid interference from radiation either.
    If some percentage of the population has some weird physiological reaction, that stimulates nerves. There was no reason for natural selection to select against that. In contrast, we evolved to take in to account that there is light around us. Porphyria is a disease, where haemoglobin react like chlorophyll when illuminated, and bad things happen. If there was no sun, natural selection would have no reason to select against pophyria.

    The physiological reaction that sensibilises to radiation could be anything.

    All this is speculative. What i want to say, it's that it's a reasonable theory.
    A very wise man has spoken ....
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  54. #154  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Quantum immortal View Post
    we didn't evolve to sense radiation.
    That's funny since our eyes do a pretty good job of it within a certain spectrum.

    Quote Originally Posted by Quantum immortal View Post
    This also means, that we didn't evolve to avoid interference from radiation either.
    No clue what this means. "Interference"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Quantum immortal View Post
    If some percentage of the population has some weird physiological reaction, that stimulates nerves.
    You have no reason to believe that this is the case except for a few internet anecdotes that are much more easily and significantly explained in ways other than some kind of superhuman ability. This has been pointed out throughout this thread.

    Quote Originally Posted by Quantum immortal View Post
    There was no reason for natural selection to select against that. In contrast, we evolved to take in to account that there is light around us. Porphyria is a disease, where haemoglobin react like chlorophyll when illuminated, and bad things happen. If there was no sun, natural selection would have no reason to select against pophyria.
    I feel like you want this to mean something, but it doesn't.

    Quote Originally Posted by Quantum immortal View Post
    The physiological reaction that sensibilises to radiation could be anything.
    It COULD be anything, but you have yet to show that it actually IS anything.

    Quote Originally Posted by Quantum immortal View Post
    All this is speculative. What i want to say, it's that it's a reasonable theory.
    You're right that it's speculative, but not that it is reasonable. You've offered up nothing of substance to suggest that certain people should be sensitive to high frequency radiation. Especially considering the dosage is only 10 times what you would receive by just being on the surface of the Earth.
    "Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." -Calvin
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  55. #155  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robittybob1 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Quantum immortal View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    What aspect of our biology allows for sensing low levels of x-rays? Do these people have some kind of special organ or a reaction to this low level of radiation that the rest of us lack? Simply being "sensitive enough" is too vague to describe what you suggest is happening.
    we didn't evolve to sense radiation. This also means, that we didn't evolve to avoid interference from radiation either.
    If some percentage of the population has some weird physiological reaction, that stimulates nerves. There was no reason for natural selection to select against that. In contrast, we evolved to take in to account that there is light around us. Porphyria is a disease, where haemoglobin react like chlorophyll when illuminated, and bad things happen. If there was no sun, natural selection would have no reason to select against pophyria.

    The physiological reaction that sensibilises to radiation could be anything.

    All this is speculative. What i want to say, it's that it's a reasonable theory.
    A very wise man has spoken ....
    Some people probably said that about snake oil salesmen, too.
    "Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." -Calvin
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  56. #156  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Quantum immortal View Post
    we didn't evolve to sense radiation.
    That's funny since our eyes do a pretty good job of it within a certain spectrum.
    obviously i meant radioactivity.

    This is not a Ph.d thesis.
    Feel free to believe what you want.
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