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Thread: Physical Limitations and Biology

  1. #1 Physical Limitations and Biology 
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    Do the laws of physics place simple quantitative limits on the range of possible biological processes in any given environment, regardless of the facts of evolution? Are there any (initially plausible) hypothetical processes that can definitely be ruled out, purely on the basis of general physical laws?

    These questions occurred to me as a result of reading the dispute in the 'Physics, Meet Biology...' thread. (I am neither a physicist nor a biologist.)


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  3. #2  
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    I'm french,and my english is not perfect.

    If i well understood, you ask for instance are very powerful organism possible to be created by nature, I would answer that physics limits what is possible to do, but I think it would be possible to create more power ful orgarnism, but the nature hasn't found the way to do so, and certainly if it hasn't happen during millions years, it won't happen quickly.

    I'm not sure at all, that I answer to what you wonder.


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  4. #3  
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    I would think nature definitely defines limitations and then organisms evolve around those restrictions if possible. For instance bacteria that live on thermals at the bottom of the ocean. The physical laws of nature in that environment have strong limiting factors on what organisms can live there.

    I'm not sure if this is what you were getting at either.
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