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Thread: Overfishing solution??

  1. #1 Overfishing solution?? 
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    Does anyone have any ideas on a solution to overfishing? Im looking for an orginal solution, something that has not yet been established. And it must be testable. Im making a survey, and i need more ideas by tonight!


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  3. #2  
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    Fish farms.


    I don't suffer from insanity, i enjoy every minute of it

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  4. #3  
    Forum Ph.D.
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    quotas would be my bet,
    Stumble on through life.
    Feel free to correct any false information, which unknown to me, may be included in my posts. (also - let this be a disclaimer)
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  5. #4  
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    Isn't the problem with fish farms that, due to the fact that the fish don't need to be spaced out (because waste can be more effectively removed and feeding can be more steady), parasites and disease can run rampent if even a single egg has a problem?

    The above problem put aside, the other problem with fish-farming in order to re-stock rivers, ponds, and lakes is that the hatched fish have no idea how to live in the wild and have a tendency to become easy prey. I do remember reading an article a while ago, however, about how farmed fish could be raised in an environment with live/un-steady feeding and interesting environments in order to make stocking fish who can actually get by in the wild. This, however, would take up more space and be costly.

    I don't have a suggestion of how to actively help the problem, but by halting fishing in bodies of water where the fish population has been greatly affected and by making the allowed number of fish that could be caught lower, the problem could be at least partially resolved.

    -Ajain
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  6. #5  
    Forum Professor Pendragon's Avatar
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    I think fish farms are indeed the solution. It may be true that 'farmed' fish are unable to survive in the wild, but they don't need to. More fish farms means less pressure on wild fish reserves, which then don't need to be restocked in the first place.

    But I guess this only works in countries with a humid climate, people in say west-Africa probaby can't upkeep artificial inland ponds and have no alternatives to overfishing natural fish stocks.

    I guess in some cases we'll just need to eat less fish. It's a luxury to have such a free and easily accesable food source as fish, but we'll have to accept that with overpopulation this luxury will just disappear. (I'm a vegaterian myself so I know from experience that, at least in a Western country, eating fish or meat are not essential for survival).
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  7. #6  
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    People won't stop fishing for sport. Even if it is outlawed, certain large fish (and, I'm sure, smaller fish to an extent) will be taken because it is easy and readily available. The number of fishers could be cut down by outlawing fishing, but places where fish populations have reached low numbers will never fully recover. Even if the fish population reaches its former highest number, the local genome will lack genetic diversity and any disease could become a major ordeal.

    In the end, restocking to an extent will be neccessary. But Fish Farms don't seem to be a final solution.

    -Ajain
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  8. #7  
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    I think quotas work the best. I know someone who has drastically helped restore seahorse populations near some Asian islands (where they are heavily harvested because of their value in Japan and China in traditional medicines) simply by having a detailed analysis of the particular ecosystem and working with the fisherman so that they don't overfish.

    The problem is that there isn't detailed enough ecological info to effectively model population of fish covering large areas. With this info in hand (and knowledge about the reproductive habits of particular species and their primary interactants in their habit) it would be possible to make meaningful quotas that would eventually allow the populations to recover.
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