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Thread: Can neurology isolate memory

  1. #1 Can neurology isolate memory 
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    Memory has never been considered to be something more than consciousness, which in turn is even less graspable.

    Memory has no mass.

    What happens to the brain of an amnesiac? Do the cells die out one by one?


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  3. #2  
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    Memory isn't entirely understood, but it is reasonably understood to involve the remodeling of synapses and neural cells through hormonal regulation by certain parts of the brain. Amnesia is usually caused by damage to the hippocampus, which is involved in regulating and sorting information from different parts of the brain, so when it's damaged you sometimes lose the ability to access memories, or other times the cells actually involved in storing those memories could be damaged. The hippocampus is also the part of the brain damaged in Alzheimer's.

    What makes this more complicated is that there seems to be different types of memory. Different parts of the brain are involved in you remembering how to ride a bicycle and you remembering what you had for lunch yesterday.

    I'm afraid that's the best I can do, neuroscience is not my thing by a long shot. It's complicated and a fast progressing field that is hard for the layman to keep up with.


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  4. #3  
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    Memory is not an isolated project by the brain. It involves both primitive and higher cortices with intricate organization. Procedural is primarily done by the non-dominant hemisphere whereas the categorical function is done by the dominant hemisphere.

    In general, memory has various derivatives. The amygdala may help store emotional/fearful memories whereas the cerebellum may strengthen more procedural memories. It is all integrated, but amnesia itself usually involves the hippocampus or various other structures in the pathway. They can include the hippocampal gyrus, hippocampus, and entorhinal cortex which would be 'dense' amnesia.
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  5. #4  
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    So it is not just the neural cells that keep memory but the whole structure including cortex tissue. What makes me ponder is the self regeneration of neural cells. Old cells have to be replaced because their longevity is short while memory stays more or less put thorough lifetime. Something must make sure to keep,long memory alive.

    Gaps between cells allow for transmition or diffusion of information but this is a dynamic process. I can not see how it can keep memories alive for a period of time.
    Storing or even exchange of memory is not the same as telling the body what to do when an impulse reaction is needed.

    Would t be possible to destroy a large chunk of human brain but leave a small part alive to preserve partial memory?

    What exactly is categorizing of memory? Is there anything that sorts out time progression?
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  6. #5  
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    I am not sure have i understood correctly what have you intended to say, but I see that you are trying to implicate the neural cells division. As far as I am informed, and I apologize if I am wrong, but the neural cells do not replicate itself, as they lack the centrosome.

    Destroying a part of the brain, but preserving memory, would be possible in the computer- like meaning. What I want to implicate is that the memory itself would be there, but there would be nothing to either read it, or process it into data.

    Also, I have read some newer research debating the possibility that the thought itself had mass.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sindrato
    I am not sure have i understood correctly what have you intended
    Also, I have read some newer research debating the possibility that the thought itself had mass.
    Do you have the link for this paper? I did a quick search but couldn't find anything, at least using these keywords.

    Assuming that thought has mass would be implying that thought is a material thing, which is very controversial to say the least.

    The only circumstance in which we could affirm such a thing, from what I can imagine, is by saying that certain cognitive processes involve the morphological modification of cells at the dendritical level and also the expression of proteins and the manufacturing of several intracellular substances. Because all these things add up extra mass to neurons, someone could affirm -- very poetically -- that thought has mass... but of course this doesn't mean that thought is material and you could touch it or something. Anyway, I'm looking forward to this report.
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    I haven't been able to find any real papers, but you can find more information here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noetic_theory , and here: However, it is quite poetically said that the thought's have mass, and rather in a way that they are able to change the physical world altogether. Unfortunately, this doesn't really go into biological side of the question, while rather philosophical and perhaps psychological.
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    Analysing by analogy can sometimes be helpful to better understand complex systems. That said, bookshelves, libraries, and computers are counterproductively used to explain the basic principles of operation within the brain. Principally, the unimaginably complex systems that govern basic memory—which doesn’t use the process of filing away information in little micro filing cabinets imbedded in the brain. In reality, as already admitted before (by others) , too little is known on how information and experiences are “recorded” and “stored” in the brain to draw out a well-defined picture of memory.

    But....

    The standard model is a complex one in which changes in both the synaptic protein synthesis and the membrane potential are produced through the activation of intracellular transduction cascades (indirectly caused by the experience). The cascades trigger transcription factors which lead to changes in the expression of genes, which in turn alters the synaptic proteins present and cause synaptic remodelling and growth. This can form and consolidate a signalling pathway and ultimately consolidate and form memories.

    Here is a breakdown of an interesting research paper investigating the effects of increasing the expression of a particular gene, at specific neurons, on the memory capacity of mice. Conservatively speaking ….this is very interesting stuff.

    http://scienceblogs.com/neurotopia/2...euron_at_a.php
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  10. #9  
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    When I hear the term amnesiac I tend to think that it means that the person will eventually regain their memories. How would they regain those memories? Does the brain "heal" itself so that the synapses are connected again? I'll have to try and consult <a href: "http://www.wna-pc.com/">Salt Lake City Utah Neurology</a> since that's where I'm from and see if they have anything to say about it. It's interesting.

    And all the talk about thought having mass made me think of Dan Brown's book The Lost Symbol. :-D
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