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Thread: Human Anatomy and Physiology

  1. #1 Human Anatomy and Physiology 
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    Good day,

    Iím a practical nurse, and although I have an understanding of anatomy and physiology (enough to understand pharm and patho, ect.) I feel like I should know more. In school I studied out of Mariebís Essentials of Human Anatomy & Physiology and with my extremely limited background in studying any science, really enjoyed the challenge it presented.

    My program (Practical Nursing) was a two year deal, with one semester being fully clinical experience. It was an insane crash course throwing you into the medical field almost fully in (really) three semesters.
    So I have the basics down, but I want to study anatomy and physiology in greater depth, so that I may study patho, pharm, ect. in greater detail so I can make better observations and decisions in my workplace. I want to be the best I can be essentially.

    So I have the basics down, what resources would you recommend for in-depth study of anatomy and physiology?


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  3. #2  
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    Dear Jamie,

    Human Anatomy isn't really my thing, and i'm not entirely sure in how much depth you wish to go. I guess that you are beyond textbook level, however I will flag up the textbook that my class were raised on during our first undergraduate year, in case it is helpful - Frederic H. Martini's 'Fundamentals of Anatomy and Physiology: 7th Ed.'

    You might also like to subscribe to a Journal dedicated to Human Anatomy and/or Physiology - e.g. the Journal of Anatomy, in order to keep abreast of research developments in the field.

    Finally, i don't know whether or not you have done this before, but it may be possible to shadow a pathologist during a post-mortem examination or general dissection, in order to learn more about Human Anatomy.

    Yours,

    Tridimity


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  4. #3  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard i_feel_tiredsleepy's Avatar
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    My degree is in microbiology and immunology, so my understanding of human physiology is somewhat superficial beyond the immune system as well. I took two courses in introductory human physiology, and one histology course. The book I had for the human physiology class was Vander's Human Physiology 11th ed., and the histology course was taught through a course pack and a heavy lab component. It's a pretty solid text, I occasionally consult it for a refresher when I have to look up some trivia on some body function in more detail than wikipedia.

    A general physiology text seems like a good place to start, then there are texts that concentrate on specific systems and organs in great detail if you want that much information.

    I'm guessing taking a part time course at a local school is out of the question, it would probably be best but also the most expensive option.

    Edit: If you're interested in pathology and pharmacology it might be worthwhile to brush up on your molecular biology and organic chemistry too. It's a big undertaking when it comes to self-learning, not impossible, but takes a lot of dedication. More dedication than I have.
    "I almost went to bed
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    and how i kissed you then
    and you kissed me
    shy as though I'd
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  5. #4  
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    Hi JamieStrome, i'm a nurse too.

    Dunno about you're training but i always found it strange how doctors learn from the micro upwards and nurses the macro downwards (we started with sociology and psychology, then A&P, and i've only studied cells in my own time - and not much).

    Its a very hard profession to get any deep understanding of any one subject when in our work lives we're expected to deal with both ends of this scale (from dealing with bereavement in a culturally sensitive way to understanding why c-diff spores are resistant to medical alcohol cleansers).

    My advice, learn the basics of biochemistry, A&P, psychosocial stuff then pick a speciality, and focus on that. Also, poke your nose around and ask questions the pathologists, pharmacists, physios and million others involved in health.


    By the way, what is a practical nurse?
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  6. #5 Re: Human Anatomy and Physiology 
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    Quote Originally Posted by JamieStrome
    Good day,

    Iím a practical nurse, and although I have an understanding of anatomy and physiology (enough to understand pharm and patho, ect.) I feel like I should know more. In school I studied out of Mariebís Essentials of Human Anatomy & Physiology and with my extremely limited background in studying any science, really enjoyed the challenge it presented.

    My program (Practical Nursing) was a two year deal, with one semester being fully clinical experience. It was an insane crash course throwing you into the medical field almost fully in (really) three semesters.
    So I have the basics down, but I want to study anatomy and physiology in greater depth, so that I may study patho, pharm, ect. in greater detail so I can make better observations and decisions in my workplace. I want to be the best I can be essentially.

    So I have the basics down, what resources would you recommend for in-depth study of anatomy and physiology?
    Costanzo for physiology. It's what we use in med school. You can also use Guytons. However, it's one thing to understand the material, it's another thing to apply it.
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