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Thread: HIV virus

  1. #1 HIV virus 
    Forum Ph.D. Heinsbergrelatz's Avatar
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    how long can a HIV virus survive without contact with host. so how long can it survive outside ones body? in the air,atmosphere....? thanks~


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  3. #2  
    Time Lord
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    HIV survives in living blood cells.

    No one has ever been infected in the ways imagined by paranoids - e.g. toilet seats, swimming pools, even pricked by junkie's discarded syringe in the beach sand.


    A pong by any other name is still a pong. -williampinn
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  4. #3  
    Forum Ph.D. Heinsbergrelatz's Avatar
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    yes thank you i am aware of that. but how long can they survive outside a humans body or a host's body???

    not to mention how about incidents in movie theaters, where they have like syringes stuck on seats...??
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  5. #4  
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    The primary targets of the HIV virus are CD4+ T cells which act as the memory cells of the immune system. As such, the potential activation of the HIV virus, once having gained entry into the cell, may remain complete throughout the lifetime of these CD4+ T cells—which are known to last years or sometimes decades, when placed in its evolved environment.

    So in general, the longevity of the HIV virus is a direct indication of the longevity of CD4+ T cells—without entry into CD4+ T cells, the virus is unable to successfully reproduce itself, by converting its RNA genome into DNA.

    Conditions will produce large differences in the lifespan of the CD4+ T cells and therefore the HIV virus. Unfortunately, the question to the answer must also describe the precise environment in which the T-cells will be placed—ambient temperature and pressure may be some of many factors.

    But as far as I am aware, T-cells don’ t generally last long in ambient environments, but again, the variable environment may also make T-cell longevity highly variable.
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