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Thread: Testicular cancer

  1. #1 Testicular cancer 
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    Why is testicular cancer so rare, in spite of its high cell turnover? -compared to other cancers like prostata, pankreas or brain cancer? Have testicular cells any special defense machanism? Or isn't the cell turnover as high as I think?

    Edit: Can the cancer frequency be measured by the cell turnover rate?


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  3. #2  
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    I'm not super knowledgeable on this subject but i might be able to answer your question a bit. I don't think the general cell turn over rate is as high as your think it is. The male testicles are constantly producing sperm cells that only live for about 48 hours. But the cells of the testicles them selves and the underdeveloped sperm cells that males are born with(which sperm cells are basically clones of) generally last for the whole the reproductive lifespan. It seems most cells last to long to become cancerous, or are recycled to quickly. I could be completely wrong tho, but that would be my guess at least. On a second note are you sure that testicular cancer is less prevalent that brain or pancreatic cancer?


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  4. #3  
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    Thanks for the answer.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cancer#Epidemiology:
    As of 2004[update], worldwide cancer caused 13% of all deaths (7.4 million). The leading causes were: lung cancer (1.3 million deaths/year), stomach cancer (803,000 deaths), colorectal cancer (639,000 deaths), liver cancer (610,000 deaths), and breast cancer (519,000 deaths)
    I don't know whether brain or pancreatic cancer is more prevalent than testicular cancer (I did not find any resource), but it is definitely less common than the above and than prostate cancer. I estimated, that men's germ cells would produce a lot of cells, compared to other tissues, in order to maximize Reproduction. I found a link, indicating that Liver cells divide less regular than sperm cells: http://www.biologie.uni-hamburg.de/b...n/division.htm I don't know whether this site is profound...
    But why is the testicular cancer less common than liver cancer, despite the higher cell division rate in Testes? I read, that the enzyme Telomerase is active only in testicular cells. Does it maybe inhibit cancer?

    Quote Originally Posted by Midgetmaid
    But the cells of the testicles them selves and the underdeveloped sperm cells that males are born with(which sperm cells are basically clones of) generally last for the whole the reproductive lifespan.
    But don' they produce the sperm cells? That means they also have to divide. They are a kind of stem cells and divide into another stem cell and the sperm cell, or am I wrong?
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