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Thread: Red blood cells

  1. #1 Red blood cells 
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    Simple question, i know in humans red blood cells have a particular shape; round with a concave surface on both sides. Is the basic shape of these cells the same in all mammals?


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  3. #2  
    Him
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    I was intrigued by the question since many diseases are associated with the shape of erythrocytes (=red blood cells)

    I found this on the internet

    In humans and most mammals, erythrocytes are anucleate and generally have the shape of a biconcave lens. An exception is the presence of oval to ellipsoidal erthyrocytes in members of the Camellidae family (e.g., llama, alpaca). Nonmammalian vertebrates, such as fish, amphibians, reptiles and birds, also may have oval to ellipsoidal erythrocytes and the nucleus is retained (1).

    (1) Canfield PJ: Comparative cell morphology in the peripheral blood film from exotic and native animals. Aust Vet J 76:793-800, 1998.


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  4. #3  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Him
    I was intrigued by the question since many diseases are associated with the shape of erythrocytes (=red blood cells)

    I found this on the internet

    In humans and most mammals, erythrocytes are anucleate and generally have the shape of a biconcave lens. An exception is the presence of oval to ellipsoidal erthyrocytes in members of the Camellidae family (e.g., llama, alpaca). Nonmammalian vertebrates, such as fish, amphibians, reptiles and birds, also may have oval to ellipsoidal erythrocytes and the nucleus is retained (1).

    (1) Canfield PJ: Comparative cell morphology in the peripheral blood film from exotic and native animals. Aust Vet J 76:793-800, 1998.
    Yup, i`m guessing the concave shape allows the cells to move more easily, they generate less resistence? In the same way a golf ball with a dimpled surface gets less air resistence, the venturi effecti think its called?
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  5. #4  
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    Oh yeah, and to increase surface area. Ah, thinking about it it must be to increase surface area, nothing to do with how it needs to flow.
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  6. #5  
    Him
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    This shape also provides the cell the necessary flexibility and it is quite deformable.
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