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Thread: Anybody here knows what is going on with my brain?

  1. #1 Anybody here knows what is going on with my brain? 
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    I was misdiagnosed and was taking Risperdal for 4 months. It has been six month now but the side effects hasn't gone away. I'm starting to believe my brain is damage. The med is suppose to block certain neurotransmitters by clinging onto receptors. I believe by doing so it changes the nervous system and the brains structure. I've read that it shrinks the frontal lobe and it increases another area. I think it is a way the brain adapt to the poison. I'm very sure psychiatrists has no clue how harmful it is to the brain. It will probably take many deaths or serious side effects to question this drugs safety. I have one sideeffect I am experiencing which feels like brain cramps( muscle stretching). It is not painful but when I take the med, the sensation stops. I have this feeling it destroys cells and damage the neurons but I'm not sure. I would appreciate any input. Thank you.


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  3. #2 Re: Anybody here knows what is going on with my brain? 
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    How were you misdiagnosed and what dose were you taking?

    [quote="starlight"]I was misdiagnosed and was taking Risperdal for 4 months. It has been six month now but the side effects hasn't gone away.


    There's a lot that takes place outside of logic.
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  4. #3 Re: Anybody here knows what is going on with my brain? 
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    Quote Originally Posted by starlight
    I was misdiagnosed and was taking Risperdal for 4 months. It has been six month now but the side effects hasn't gone away. I'm starting to believe my brain is damage. The med is suppose to block certain neurotransmitters by clinging onto receptors. I believe by doing so it changes the nervous system and the brains structure. I've read that it shrinks the frontal lobe and it increases another area. I think it is a way the brain adapt to the poison. I'm very sure psychiatrists has no clue how harmful it is to the brain. It will probably take many deaths or serious side effects to question this drugs safety. I have one sideeffect I am experiencing which feels like brain cramps( muscle stretching). It is not painful but when I take the med, the sensation stops. I have this feeling it destroys cells and damage the neurons but I'm not sure. I would appreciate any input. Thank you.

    Hi, i`ve been on risperidone which i believe is the same drug as the one you are taking, i was also on buspirone (i think it`s called) which is a trnquilizer, buspirone counters the anxiety side effect caused by resperidone. In the end i suffered from very bad anziety (total loss of sleep, and a sensation of pain throughout my body coupled with the fear the pain would never stop).

    It sounds like you are experiencing a form of anxiety, tell your doctor the side effects, he may prescribe olanzapine which is another anti psychotic which i believe doesn`t cause anxiety, which was what i ended up on. I also ended up on diazapam to calm me down.

    How did you end up on this medication anyway? What disorder have you been diagnosed with? I was put down as paranoid schizophrenic though i believe by psychosis was triggered by drug use (marijuana).

    The way i understand it psychosis is more damaging to your brain than the drugs used to prevent it (ie your safer taking the drugs than not. I`m not using medication myself at the moment (and havn`t for more than a year) but i would if i was hallucinating badly.
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  5. #4 Re: Anybody here knows what is going on with my brain? 
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    Quote Originally Posted by Question
    [The way i understand it psychosis is more damaging to your brain than the drugs used to prevent it (ie your safer taking the drugs than not. I`m not using medication myself at the moment (and havn`t for more than a year) but i would if i was hallucinating badly.
    Here is a link:

    Http://thestreetspirit.Org/august2005/madinterview.Htm


    I had only one hallucination due to a panic attack. The hallucination made me a bit delusional since it is about religion. It brought me to the hospital three times until I realise religion is fake. I now just believe in God.

    I started this thread to see if anybody here is familiar with receptors and neurotransmitters and what would happen to the brain when the drug is introduce. What does it damage?
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  6. #5 Re: Anybody here knows what is going on with my brain? 
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    Quote Originally Posted by starlight
    Quote Originally Posted by Question
    [The way i understand it psychosis is more damaging to your brain than the drugs used to prevent it (ie your safer taking the drugs than not. I`m not using medication myself at the moment (and havn`t for more than a year) but i would if i was hallucinating badly.
    Here is a link:

    Http://thestreetspirit.Org/august2005/madinterview.Htm


    I had only one hallucination due to a panic attack. The hallucination made me a bit delusional since it is about religion. It brought me to the hospital three times until I realise religion is fake. I now just believe in God.

    I started this thread to see if anybody here is familiar with receptors and neurotransmitters and what would happen to the brain when the drug is introduce. What does it damage?
    Well i hope someone can answer that, i read up a little on the anti psychotic treatments drugs and about anti-psychotic treatments and many people spend most of there lives on drugs like risperidone, if they don`t take them they relapse. If they had any really harmful effects they would become apparent in the people that have to take them for the rest of their lives.

    Your panic attack out of interest, was it like palpitations? You thought you were having a heart attack and going to die? Or were you afraid of dieing and going to hell, being judged and punished, along those lines? If you don`t mind me asking. I`ve had the same anxieties as these, but i am an athiest myself, i was brought up as an athiest anyway.
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  7. #6 Re: Anybody here knows what is going on with my brain? 
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    Quote Originally Posted by Question
    Well i hope someone can answer that, i read up a little on the anti psychotic treatments drugs and about anti-psychotic treatments and many people spend most of there lives on drugs like risperidone, if they don`t take them they relapse.
    That's what psychiatrists want you to believe. Here is proof.
    http://www.moshersoteria.com/

    Soteria
    Through Madness to Deliverance
    This book is the story, told by Loren R. Mosher, M.D., Voyce Hendrix, LCSW, and Deborah C. Fort, Ph.D., of a special time, space, and place where young people diagnosed as "schizophrenic" found a social environment where they were related to, listened to, and understood during their altered states of consciousness. Rarely, and only with consent, did these distressed and distressing persons take "tranquilizers." They lived in a home in a California suburb with nonmedical caregivers whose goal was not to "do to" them but to "be with" them. The place was called "Soteria" (Greek for deliverance), and there, for not much money, most recovered. Although Soteria's approach was swept away by conventional drug-oriented psychiatry, its humanistic orientation still has broad appeal to those who find the mental health mainstream limited in both theory and practice. This book recounts a noble experiment to alleviate oppression and suffering without destroying their victims.

    Quote Originally Posted by Question
    Your panic attack out of interest, was it like palpitations? You thought you were having a heart attack and going to die? Or were you afraid of dieing and going to hell, being judged and punished, along those lines? If you don`t mind me asking. I`ve had the same anxieties as these, but i am an athiest myself, i was brought up as an athiest anyway.
    I thought I was going to die because I believed in signs.
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  8. #7 Re: Anybody here knows what is going on with my brain? 
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    Quote Originally Posted by starlight
    Quote Originally Posted by Question
    Well i hope someone can answer that, i read up a little on the anti psychotic treatments drugs and about anti-psychotic treatments and many people spend most of there lives on drugs like risperidone, if they don`t take them they relapse.
    That's what psychiatrists want you to believe. Here is proof.
    http://www.moshersoteria.com/

    Soteria
    Through Madness to Deliverance
    This book is the story, told by Loren R. Mosher, M.D., Voyce Hendrix, LCSW, and Deborah C. Fort, Ph.D., of a special time, space, and place where young people diagnosed as "schizophrenic" found a social environment where they were related to, listened to, and understood during their altered states of consciousness. Rarely, and only with consent, did these distressed and distressing persons take "tranquilizers." They lived in a home in a California suburb with nonmedical caregivers whose goal was not to "do to" them but to "be with" them. The place was called "Soteria" (Greek for deliverance), and there, for not much money, most recovered. Although Soteria's approach was swept away by conventional drug-oriented psychiatry, its humanistic orientation still has broad appeal to those who find the mental health mainstream limited in both theory and practice. This book recounts a noble experiment to alleviate oppression and suffering without destroying their victims.

    Quote Originally Posted by Question
    Your panic attack out of interest, was it like palpitations? You thought you were having a heart attack and going to die? Or were you afraid of dieing and going to hell, being judged and punished, along those lines? If you don`t mind me asking. I`ve had the same anxieties as these, but i am an athiest myself, i was brought up as an athiest anyway.
    I thought I was going to die because I believed in signs.
    It all depends who you trust doesn`t it?
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  9. #8 Re: Anybody here knows what is going on with my brain? 
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    Quote Originally Posted by Question
    It all depends who you trust doesn`t it?
    http://www.dantescure.com/conversation.html

    A Conversation with Dr. Dorman

    What was your inspiration to become a doctor? And how did you choose the field of psychiatry?

    I had a strong interest in chemistry and biology back in high school. Once in college, I could see that medicine was my calling. In my first year of medical school, psychiatry was my favorite course. I was fascinated by the mind. After my internship, I thought I wanted an academic career, so I took a postdoctoral fellowship in neurophysiology-studying and doing research on the brain. That's when I discovered I missed a clinical setting-listening to people talk about their problems and how their minds worked. I put myself through medical school by working and obtaining loans, so I practiced family medicine for six years to pay off my debts, and then I started my residency training in psychiatry at UCLA.


    You met Catherine when you were in your first year of psychiatry training at UCLA Medical Center. She was psychotic and only nineteen-years-old. What made you think you could cure her?

    I had read books by psychiatrists who really had an interest in the mind of the psychotic person. Back then, in the 60's, there was plenty to read: Frieda Fromm-Reichmann, the treating psychiatrist in I Never Promised You A Rose Garden, Harry Stack Sullivan, Harold Searles, and many others. These people were actually listening to the psychotic person-not just managing or controlling some of his distress with drugs or electric shock treatments. I was convinced that the person suffering from schizophrenia struggled with the same problems as anyone else, but for degree. I thought that if I could understand Catherine's inner world, find out why she was trapped in madness, I might help her find a way out. At least I thought that it was worth a try.


    Catherine is an active, healthy woman who is fully employed and socially integrated. The National Institutes of Mental Health states that 1 in every 100 Americans suffers from schizophrenia, but only 1 in 5 recovers. How is recovery defined? What do most doctors, professionals, as well as family members consider to be a significant recovery?

    The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) web site is misleading. One in five people do not recover completely, as the web site states. NIMH and most doctors define recovery as a reduction or elimination of so-called "psychotic symptoms," defined as hallucinations, delusions, alleged distorted perceptions and profound withdrawal. Those few symptoms hardly describe the magnitude of the difficulties faced by a person with schizophrenia. Not included in the definition are serious problems with relationships, work, motivation, energy, purpose, self-esteem, self-care, hopefulness, creativity, and ability to love-in short, everything most of us live for. Most so-called recovered schizophrenics are living in halfway houses or in sheltered environments. If they work at all, it is usually at menial jobs. They usually do not form meaningful relationships. They do not develop and grow in a substantial way, and they walk around mentally dulled by the medications they take. True recovery, Catherine's recovery, is so rare that it is not even mentioned in the psychiatric literature. In fact, young psychiatrists are taught that if a schizophrenic person ends up living a normal life, then he couldn't have had schizophrenia!


    Catherine is an unusual case, having fully recovered from schizophrenia and without the use of medication. What was special about her treatment, and how was it different from how most patients with this disease are treated?

    Catherine did fully recover. She lives a rich and full life. She has a responsible job. She is a member of several county commissions. She lectures. She has had long-term relationships. She has many interests. She even is a semi-professional flamenco dancer. She has never been on medication. I saw Catherine six days a week in psychotherapy for three years while she was in the hospital. For the next three years I saw her five days a week, and then three days a week during her last year of therapy. Therapy as I see it is an attempt to hear the other person, her soul and her struggles. As Catherine told me about herself, she and I both learned about her self, who she was. I added my self-my strength and my perspective — to help her understand herself and her fears. The result was that she slowly developed a more realistic self over time. In other words, she grew and developed. She left her schizophrenia behind. Most patients with schizophrenia see their doctors a few minutes a month for medication checks. What the schizophrenic person says is not taken seriously by his doctor. He is regarded as crazy. His struggles are never known. How can a person work his way out of his fears without knowing something about himself? He can't.


    What is the difference between drug therapy and the kind of therapy Catherine received?

    Drug therapy is not treatment-it's management. And not very good management, since most schizophrenics end up living very limited lives. In fact, there is good evidence that a lifetime of taking drugs, the standard treatment in the United States, may do harm. Telling a schizophrenic, or even a depressed or anxious person, that he has a brain disease and that he must be on drugs, is telling him that he is a hopeless case. It is telling him that the best he can do is to live a limited life. Just administering drugs leave the problem at the core untouched. Most psychiatrists do not believe that there is a problem at the core that can be understood and treated. The psychiatrist is writing a prescription for himself, since he doesn't know what else to do for his patient. I saw Catherine as being just as human as anyone else-with problems, struggles, hopes and dreams. I intended to help her identify and resolve her problems, and to grow and develop. It was a lot of work, all those years. But it was worth it. She's a normal, healthy person.


    Aren't you going against the grain by saying that schizophrenia is a not a brain disease? Most of what we read is that mental illness, and schizophrenia in particular, is due to abnormal brain chemistry.

    Yes, I am going against the grain. The psychiatrist-drug company cabal would have us believe that mental suffering means we have diseases of the brain-broken brains. They tell us that chemical imbalances in the brain cause depression, anxiety and madness. Nothing could be further from the truth. One can find brain correlates of any mental state. But what causes the mental state? It is hopelessly simplistic and reductive to say that a singular measurement of cellular activity causes something as complex as a mental state. The measurement is much more likely to be the result of a mental state. Trying to understand mental life using a medical model-seeing mental life as nothing more than brain activity — is too limiting. Measurement is the catechism of science. There are some things you cannot measure, such as the experience of being human. How do you measure my tears when I stand in front of a painting by Vermeer? You might get a few measurements within my brain, but that would tell you very little. One cannot reduce mental life down to cellular activity anyway. It is like saying that an opera is nothing but notes. Mental illnesses are not illnesses at all. Mental struggles are states of mind, responsive to the human spirit. The official word, however, is that Catherine suffered from a broken brain. It says right on the NIMH web site that schizophrenia is a brain disease. If Catherine had had a broken brain, how is it that she recovered? There was nothing broken about Catherine's brain.
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  10. #9  
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    Right. Don't worry about the drugs. The side-effects will eventually wear off, and them 'clinging on to your receptors' is temporarily. Still, if you keep experiencing side-effects or abnormalities, I would most certainly suggest you visit the doctor who prescribed those drugs.

    That's an interesting case, that is, 'Catherine'. Do you have a link to a scientific journal?

    Mr U
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  11. #10 Re: Anybody here knows what is going on with my brain? 
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    Quote Originally Posted by starlight
    I was misdiagnosed and was taking Risperdal for 4 months. It has been six month now but the side effects hasn't gone away. I'm starting to believe my brain is damage. The med is suppose to block certain neurotransmitters by clinging onto receptors. I believe by doing so it changes the nervous system and the brains structure. I've read that it shrinks the frontal lobe and it increases another area. I think it is a way the brain adapt to the poison. I'm very sure psychiatrists has no clue how harmful it is to the brain. It will probably take many deaths or serious side effects to question this drugs safety. I have one sideeffect I am experiencing which feels like brain cramps( muscle stretching). It is not painful but when I take the med, the sensation stops. I have this feeling it destroys cells and damage the neurons but I'm not sure. I would appreciate any input. Thank you.
    Nobody here can make an accurate diagnosis. You MUST go to a neurologist to get this checked out. Don't rely on anything anyone says on a discussion board when it concerns your health (no offense guys).
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    http://www.madinamerica.com/SOURCES....0WHO%20Studies

    21. Raquel Gur, “Subcortical MRI Volumes in Neuroleptic-Naïve and Treated Patients with Schizophrenia.” American Journal of Psychiatry, 155 (1998),1711-1717.

    Neuroleptics cause hypertrophy of the caudate, putamen, and thalamus, which is thought to be “structural adaptation to receptor blockade.” The drug-induced hypertrophy is also “associated with greater severity of both negative and positive symptoms.”

    22. Raquel Gur, “A follow-up of magnetic resonance imaging study of schizophrenia.” Archives of General Psychiatry, 55 (1998), 145-151.

    Use of neuroleptics is associated with volume reduction (or atrophy) of frontal lobes and temporal lobes. As the brain atrophies in this way, there is an improvement in delusions and thought disorder. A greater rate of reduction in volume is associated with higher dose. At the same time, reduction in volume is associated with decline in some neurobehavioral functions.
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  13. #12 Re: Anybody here knows what is going on with my brain? 
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    Quote Originally Posted by andrew
    Nobody here can make an accurate diagnosis. You MUST go to a neurologist to get this checked out. Don't rely on anything anyone says on a discussion board when it concerns your health (no offense guys).
    I'm thinking about waiting another two months before I see a neurologist. This sensation might go away. It is getting a little better.
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  14. #13  
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    Miranda Chakos. Increase in Caudate Nuclei Volumes of First-Episode Schizophrenic Patients Taking Antipsychotic Drugs. Am Jour Psych 151, 1430-1435. 1994. (Neuroleptics increase caudate volumes 5.7% during first 18 months of treatment in first-episode schizophrenic patients. Higher dosage is associated with larger increase in caudate volumes.)
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  15. #14 Re: Anybody here knows what is going on with my brain? 
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    Quote Originally Posted by starlight
    Quote Originally Posted by andrew
    Nobody here can make an accurate diagnosis. You MUST go to a neurologist to get this checked out. Don't rely on anything anyone says on a discussion board when it concerns your health (no offense guys).
    I'm thinking about waiting another two months before I see a neurologist. This sensation might go away. It is getting a little better.
    Is there any specific reason why you want to wait 2 months? That is a long time and, in my opinion, not a good idea. A lot can happen in two months - good or bad - so you are better off not risking it. I would see a neurologist ASAP. In fact, your best bet is to see someone who specializes in both neurology and psychiatry. Never delay seeing a doctor....especially when it has something to do with the nervous system.
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  16. #15 Re: Anybody here knows what is going on with my brain? 
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    Quote Originally Posted by andrew
    Nobody here can make an accurate diagnosis. You MUST go to a neurologist to get this checked out. Don't rely on anything anyone says on a discussion board when it concerns your health (no offense guys).
    I just want to emphasise that this is good advice. Take it.
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  17. #16 Re: Anybody here knows what is going on with my brain? 
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ophiolite
    Quote Originally Posted by andrew
    Nobody here can make an accurate diagnosis. You MUST go to a neurologist to get this checked out. Don't rely on anything anyone says on a discussion board when it concerns your health (no offense guys).
    I just want to emphasise that this is good advice. Take it.
    http://www.ahrp.org/infomail/05/08/29a.php

    Similarly, Harvard neuroscientist Stephen Hyman described the mechanism of action of psychoactive drugs - before his career change from scientist to administrator, first as Director of NIMH, currently, Provost of Harvard. In an article in the American Journal of Psychiatry, Hyman explained that whether abused or prescribed, the mechanisms by which psychoactive drugs work--including stimulants, antidepressants and antipsychotics - is they "create perturbations in neurotransmitter functions." (Hyman & Nestler, 1996)

    Repeated "perturbations" (i.e., chronic use of psychoactive drugs), Hyman noted, "usurp normal homeostatic mechanisms within neurons" (i.e., interfere with normal brain function) "thereby producing adaptations that lead to substantial and long-lasting alterations in neural function." In the case of stimulants, Hyman wrote, the brain's "adaptation" results in addiction.


    I don't want to waste my money seeing a neurologist, probably spend a lot of money on scans, to just pinpoint where the problem is but I know they can't fix it. I'm going to rely on my brain to fix it on its own. If it's not capable, then I will consider it irreversible. It does not seem like it's getting worse, so I am very hopeful.
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  18. #17 Re: Anybody here knows what is going on with my brain? 
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    Quote Originally Posted by starlight
    I don't want to waste my money seeing a neurologist, probably spend a lot of money on scans, to just pinpoint where the problem is but I know they can't fix it. I'm going to rely on my brain to fix it on its own. If it's not capable, then I will consider it irreversible. It does not seem like it's getting worse, so I am very hopeful.
    Are you serious? If you consider it a waste of money, then that's truly unfortunate. How can you possibly say that they can't fix it when you have no clue what is really wrong? They study for years upon years for a reason. True, the brain has its own ways of fixing things - but you should not take that risk based on research you did on the Internet. But hey, it's your life and your health. Good luck to you.
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  19. #18 Re: Anybody here knows what is going on with my brain? 
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    I had a few psychotic episodes a few years back from excessive marijuana smoking (and other factors).
    I ended up being hospitalised for a few days but became so anxious
    about being caged up, that they had to let me out.

    It has taken me a long time to recover from this with a lot of support
    from my family.

    There are a few things that I would say about the experience:

    1) If you think you're crazy, spend a couple of days in a psychiatric
    ward. Not for the help but to meet some truly crazy people.

    2) Don't go there unless it is absolutely vital. e.g fears of self-harm etc.
    Once you admit to a disorder, prepare to become institutionalised.
    Not nearly enough is known about the brain and its remarkable resilience.
    Psychiatrist will pigeon hole you and you may find this exasperates your
    symptoms.

    3) Don't think for one second that your psychiatrist understands you.
    I fear that 8/10 random people placed on a shrinks couch will be ear-
    marked with some kind of 'disorder'.

    That is not to say I am underplaying the truly debilitating effects of
    neurological disease but I would say that the distinction between sane
    and crazy is better defined by your ability to cope.

    Look around you at the insane fabric of our society. How our current
    attitudes and acceptancies may in 10 years be considered insane.
    Think about being locked up and looked down upon while people like
    Boy George and Gary Glitter are walking around. :x
    Look at religious fanatics who believe vehemently in symbols and will
    fight, rape and kill in their name.
    Yes the worlds crazy and if you think people are out to get you, you're
    probably right if you give them the chance. So don't.

    Keep your life, simple and tidy.
    Choose your friends well and find things you enjoy doing and work at them.
    Take yourself away from situations that you know provoke reactions. Learn to recognise your reward mechanisms but try and view them with irony.
    Eat well and exercise plenty. (Starting to sound like sunscreen song) Seriously it's important to get rid of your bodies toxins.

    And most of all, keep talking.
    There's a lot that takes place outside of logic.
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  20. #19  
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    Starlight,
    I hope you are finding the discussion helpful to you. I wish to reiterate that the only help you should be looking for from this thread is the benefit that arises from airing your concerns.

    On matters relating to health, mental or physical, the only advice you should ever take from an internet forum is - see a professional.

    I ask that other posters keep this in mind. In future, if medical advice is offered that post will be deleted and if the habit persists I shall lock this thread.

    Thank you.
    Ophiolite
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  21. #20 Re: Anybody here knows what is going on with my brain? 
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    Quote Originally Posted by thequ1ck
    Keep your life, simple and tidy.
    Choose your friends well and find things you enjoy doing and work at them.
    Take yourself away from situations that you know provoke reactions. Learn to recognise your reward mechanisms but try and view them with irony.
    Eat well and exercise plenty. (Starting to sound like sunscreen song) Seriously it's important to get rid of your bodies toxins.

    And most of all, keep talking.
    It has been four month now without risperdal, I'm almost back to my old self except for the side-effect I hope is not permanent. I'm exercising, eating well, taking vitamins, binkgo biloba, and flaxseed seed oil. The dead sensation feeling in the front part of my brain( i think frontal lobe) is still present but it is slowly improving. I thank the cells for that.
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  22. #21 Re: Anybody here knows what is going on with my brain? 
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    This is good, I hope you're off the herb then.
    Ophiolite is right about taking medical advice from
    Internet forums. My intention is not to give you
    advice other than tell my own story.

    My point is that the brain is remarkably resilient,
    you know that hissing sound in your ear after you've
    been in a loud nightclub. That never actually goes away,
    your brain just cancels the noise out.
    The only thing the brain actually registers is change.
    What I'm saying is if you're experiencing weird sensations
    in your head and they are lessening, it's change and
    for the better



    Quote Originally Posted by starlight
    It has been four month now without risperdal, I'm almost back to my old self except for the side-effect I hope is not permanent. I'm exercising, eating well, taking vitamins, binkgo biloba, and flaxseed seed oil. The dead sensation feeling in the front part of my brain( i think frontal lobe) is still present but it is slowly improving. I thank the cells for that.
    There's a lot that takes place outside of logic.
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    My intention in posting this thread is to learn more about drug interaction with the brain and how it deteriorates it. I'm NOT seeking medical advice. I already know how psychiatrists deals with more severe cases like tardive dyskinesia. They use vitamin e, drugs, oils, and electroshock( if it is very severe). I really came here to learn. I don't care if it is a guess. Is this ok, Ophiolite?

    I understand receptors can form new ones. Is this possible? What happens to a neuron when it is damage? Does the whole section get washed away?
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    My advice starlight at the risk of being facetious is to obtain stimulation by facilitating an anatomical juxtposition of a supercilious subjects orbicularis oric muscles around the urethra in a state of contraction.

    It's the best medicine known to man :wink:
    There's a lot that takes place outside of logic.
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  25. #24  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by starlight
    I really came here to learn. I don't care if it is a guess. Is this ok, Ophiolite?
    Absolutely fine. Just take everything you read with a very large dose of salt (figuratively speaking!).
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  26. #25  
    Forum Freshman thequ1ck's Avatar
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    As far as I know, although I haven't researched it, there is no cellular
    atrophy caused by the inhibition mechanisms.
    The use of selective inhibitors to alter mental processing may cause
    cells to become inactive but not to be destroyed.
    Existing synaptic links however may not be re-enforced by ongoing
    neuronal firing and after the course of medicine will likely undergo
    an altered state of relationship to other neurons.

    Put simply it's like building a dam in a river. Once the dam is removed,
    the new furrows caused in its wake should alter its course.
    There's a lot that takes place outside of logic.
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  27. #26  
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    Quote Originally Posted by thequ1ck
    As far as I know, although I haven't researched it, there is no cellular
    atrophy caused by the inhibition mechanisms..
    How do you explain the shrinkage of frontal lobes in people taking antipsychotic drugs? The longer they are on it, the more shrinkage until a certain point. There are test scans that can show it. Psychiatrists already admitted it. Perhaps it is the toxicity.


    Quote Originally Posted by thequ1ck
    The use of selective inhibitors to alter mental processing may cause
    cells to become inactive but not to be destroyed..
    Maybe the cells are either clump up or may not be able to be active again.



    Quote Originally Posted by thequ1ck
    Existing synaptic links however may not be re-enforced by ongoing
    neuronal firing and after the course of medicine will likely undergo
    an altered state of relationship to other neurons.

    Put simply it's like building a dam in a river. Once the dam is removed,
    the new furrows caused in its wake should alter its course.
    In theory it is suppose to be like a dam, however the environment changes! People on antipsychotic drugs will have a terrible time withdrawing because of this reason. The sad truth is that most of them didn't really need it to recover and by taking antipsychotics they created permanent brain damage to themselves. Psychiatrists already admitted they cause structure change but they don't want to admit it is dangerous. Psychiatrists need meds to KEEP their JOB. Seeing a therapist or psychologist is the other alternative. In the future, that will become mainstream. I think 10 to 15 years from now, there will be many millions of people who are on antipsychotics will have tardive dyskinesia.
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