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Thread: chlorophyll/cellulose genes inserted into bacteria ?

  1. #1 chlorophyll/cellulose genes inserted into bacteria ? 
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    Hello there !,

    Just wondering, is it possible to remove genes from plants and substituted them into a bacterial plasmid ?

    Doing this with chlorophyll could potentially hold an importance in renewable energy ?
    With cellulose, polymer technology. Please discuss and give some feedback.

    Thanks - Mr. Joshers


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  3. #2  
    Reptile Dysfunction drowsy turtle's Avatar
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    I'm sure this is possible; it certainly is for animal cells.

    Insulin, as well as other substances, are produced industrially by inserting genes into bacteria by HGT and leaving them to it.


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  4. #3  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard spuriousmonkey's Avatar
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    You can put anything in a bacteria. Depending on the size.

    Not that you always get the correct protein though. Folding mechanisms etc are different.
    "Kill them all and let God sort them out."

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    Forum Cosmic Wizard i_feel_tiredsleepy's Avatar
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    Also, cyanobacteria already produce chlorophyll naturally.
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    Hello,

    Thanks a lot for your replies !

    Response to last post: cyanobacteria synthesize that gene but do they secrete chlorophyll ?

    I am glad we have established the credibility of it, now what about the uses ? any ideas ? i was going along the energy line of thought ?

    I am not a molecular biologist, but i would like to know if its possible to alter a gene, to make it secreted rather than used within the bacteria ?

    Thanks - Josh
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  7. #6  
    Reptile Dysfunction drowsy turtle's Avatar
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    Certainly. Bacteria already secrete toxins, enzymes, etc.
    "The major difference between a thing that might go wrong and a thing that cannot possibly go wrong is that when a thing that cannot possibly go wrong goes wrong it usually turns out to be impossible to get at or repair." ~ Douglas Adams
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  8. #7  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard i_feel_tiredsleepy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrjoshers
    Hello,

    Thanks a lot for your replies !

    Response to last post: cyanobacteria synthesize that gene but do they secrete chlorophyll ?

    I am glad we have established the credibility of it, now what about the uses ? any ideas ? i was going along the energy line of thought ?

    I am not a molecular biologist, but i would like to know if its possible to alter a gene, to make it secreted rather than used within the bacteria ?

    Thanks - Josh
    I'm not exactly sure why that would be useful though, apart from creating a green soupish solution.

    Photosynthesis produces energy by generating a proton gradient, which in turn is used to produce ATP. Burning petrochemicals is far more efficient.
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  9. #8  
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    Thanks for reply,

    Well surely creating energy using the same process as photosynthesis is much more eco-friendly than burning petrochemicals ?

    Isnt there some way of harnessing the energy producing capabilities of the photosynthetic cycle ?
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  10. #9  
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrjoshers
    Thanks for reply,

    Well surely creating energy using the same process as photosynthesis is much more eco-friendly than burning petrochemicals ?

    Isnt there some way of harnessing the energy producing capabilities of the photosynthetic cycle ?
    I'm not sure of any real method for harnessing said energy, we certainly don't have anything close to working at an industrial level or any real prospects that can be scaled up that i'm aware of.

    A more promising area would be next generation biofuels (algal biofuels, etc) however i have doubts in this area of research. A significant amount of time and money has been invested but there hasn't been any significant advancements in a long time that move us closer to scaling up the process to a substantial level.
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