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Thread: viral infection of a cell

  1. #1 viral infection of a cell 
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    A virus enters a cell in order to hijack the cell's ability to replicate viral RNA. An antiviral drug like Epivir thwarts it by interfering with replication. QUESTION: Is this detrimental to the normal process of cell replacement? [/b]


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  3. #2  
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    Is which detrimental to cell replacement?


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  4. #3 antivirals 
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    The question is: Does the fact that an antiviral drug prevents the virus from hijacking the replication powers of a cell also stop cells from replacing themselves in the normal way?
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  5. #4 Re: antivirals 
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    Quote Originally Posted by prenderm
    The question is: Does the fact that an antiviral drug prevents the virus from hijacking the replication powers of a cell also stop cells from replacing themselves in the normal way?
    Well when a virus hijacks a cell, it isn't hijacking the cell's ability to replicate, its hijacking the cell's ability to make new DNA, RNA and protein. We can block those functions, which would be detrimental to the cell if sustained over long periods. But whether we block in this way depends on the drug. Most of them will be specifically targeted to block the activity of some viral protein rather than blocking functions of the cell itself. Or we can block the receptors a virus uses to enter a cell. There's many approaches, but generally shutting down cell function is not one of them, although it is a tactic often temporarily employed by the body itself.
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  6. #5  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard i_feel_tiredsleepy's Avatar
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    Drugs like nucleoside analogs, such as ribaririn, that inhibit RNA replication do have serious side-effects. That's why they are generally only used for serious infections that lack better options, like chronic Hep C.

    Edit: AZT is another infamous nucleoside analog known for it's nasty effects on the person being treated.
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  7. #6 viral infection of a cell 
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    Thanks for the specific info about the effect of meds on viral hijacking of a cell. As a liver transplant recipient, I am hungry for knowledge about cellular replacement and related subjects. Long term effects of antivirals, and unexpected side effects, occur on a molecular level so infintisimally small that it boggles comprehension. Further discussion would be enlightening and welcomed.
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  8. #7  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard spuriousmonkey's Avatar
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    I assume that life without a liver is more worrisome than one with longterm detrimental effects on the entire organism.
    "Kill them all and let God sort them out."

    - Arnaud Amalric

    http://spuriousforums.com/index.php
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  9. #8 viral infection of a cell 
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    Right on. Life with a new and functioning liver is NEW life. After two years of slowly losing life force and two months of misery, I now appreciate the organ donor group's motto of "Give the Gift of Life." These biochemical academic discussions have resulted in miracles of nature and man. So keep on chatting. Ideas are being born here and worlds are being saved.
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