Notices
Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Ecology or genetics?

  1. #1 Ecology or genetics? 
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    39
    Hi im new here. Im 21 and applyed for uni next year to study science.
    Most of the science courses entail that you pick certain subjects, i was hoping to branch of into zoology/ecology or along the lines of genetics. I no that its very broad but im wondering how precise in subject choice do you have to be for your career? Does a broader choice of subjects help or hinder you in the long run?

    What i want to study is ecology, bionomics and how oraganisms evolve within certain ecologys. Genetics also interests me and with recent and future advancements mean this will be an interesting field and no doubt growing field whereas i've heard before that a zoology degree is really a go no where degree because it itself is too broad of a subject (Jack of all trades, master of none knid of thing). Im wondering which between ecology, zoology and genetics is the "best" field to get into? And what is employment availability and career variations like?
    Thanks in advance to whoever can answer any of my questions


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Moderator Moderator TheBiologista's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,569
    Generally speaking your degree courses won't restrict your choices too much- so long as you pick a biology degree that is. You should be able to make some more important choices towards the end of your degree when things like work placements, lab projects or literature projects come into play.

    If you're talking about getting straight into the private sector after your degree then most jobs will only be interested in a life sciences or chemistry degree. The only major consideration being whether the career you want has any special accreditation requirements. I notice that you are Irish, so an example for you would be courses that give eligibility for admission into the Academy of Medical Laboratory Sciences which is a requirement for medical scientist positions.

    If you want to do a Masters or PhD, then your options should be fairly wide open so long as you get a 2.1 degree or better. Subject choice from your degree won't matter much, but the topic of your postgrad position will start to restrict you a lot more.


    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    39
    Thanks for the quick reply, if all goes well i would like to get a Masters and possibly a PhD. Most of the post grad research in Ireland i seen doesn't exactly seem to fit but i've got plenty of time to figure that one out i suppose. Thanks so much for the help its very much appreciated.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Moderator Moderator TheBiologista's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,569
    Quote Originally Posted by NoLeafClover
    Thanks for the quick reply, if all goes well i would like to get a Masters and possibly a PhD. Most of the post grad research in Ireland i seen doesn't exactly seem to fit but i've got plenty of time to figure that one out i suppose. Thanks so much for the help its very much appreciated.
    Well you'll only really have a feel for what you want to do once you've had a chance to study and do practical work during your degree, so don't worry too much. Just make sure you engage well with your course material so you get a taste of as broad a range of subjects as possible!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Forum Ph.D.
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Dublin, Ireland
    Posts
    945
    Hi welcome to the forum,

    Just out of curiosity, what colleges are you applying for? (donít have to answer that if you donít want to)


    Personally I found that the way things are taught here with biology seems to be oriented toward a molecular level in detail or a broad study of (such as zoology or ecology) where you do both look at animals/plants as a whole but also the cellular functioning.

    As TheBiologista has said whatever you do chose wonít limit your options much and as you progress you will find you enjoy one over the other.

    Most Irish Universities (as far as Iím aware) tend to offer general biology, chemistry, maths and others for first year. The biology covers all aspects of biology in a brief sense and is typically a repeat with a little step up from the leaving cert course, designed to challenge those who have done it before but allow others to start biology from scratch.


    In second year they ask you to narrow down, this is where I see the greatest divide between the molecular end and the general biology side.

    But when you do get that far, you will know more about which direction to take.

    If I was to suggest two things, 1) genetics is booming and is a way forward but 2) there is no point doing it if you prefer ecology, find a job you like and youíll never work a day in your life.

    If you do have any other questions about Irish science studies/courses feel free to PM me as I am currently bang in the middle of that process myself.
    Stumble on through life.
    Feel free to correct any false information, which unknown to me, may be included in my posts. (also - let this be a disclaimer)
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard paralith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    2,190
    Zoology has a great future in research - just not in the private sector, unless you want to be a vetrinarian.
    Man can will nothing unless he has first understood that he must count on no one but himself; that he is alone, abandoned on earth in the midst of his infinite responsibilities, without help, with no other aim than the one he sets himself, with no other destiny than the one he forges for himself on this earth.
    ~Jean-Paul Sartre
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7 Re: Ecology or genetics? 
    Forum Cosmic Wizard spuriousmonkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    2,193
    Quote Originally Posted by NoLeafClover
    Hi im new here. Im 21 and applyed for uni next year to study science.
    Most of the science courses entail that you pick certain subjects, i was hoping to branch of into zoology/ecology or along the lines of genetics. I no that its very broad but im wondering how precise in subject choice do you have to be for your career? Does a broader choice of subjects help or hinder you in the long run?

    What i want to study is ecology, bionomics and how oraganisms evolve within certain ecologys. Genetics also interests me and with recent and future advancements mean this will be an interesting field and no doubt growing field whereas i've heard before that a zoology degree is really a go no where degree because it itself is too broad of a subject (Jack of all trades, master of none knid of thing). Im wondering which between ecology, zoology and genetics is the "best" field to get into? And what is employment availability and career variations like?
    Thanks in advance to whoever can answer any of my questions
    Study eco-evo-devo
    "Kill them all and let God sort them out."

    - Arnaud Amalric

    http://spuriousforums.com/index.php
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #8  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    39
    Quote Originally Posted by goodgod3rd
    Hi welcome to the forum,

    Just out of curiosity, what colleges are you applying for? (donít have to answer that if you donít want to)


    Personally I found that the way things are taught here with biology seems to be oriented toward a molecular level in detail or a broad study of (such as zoology or ecology) where you do both look at animals/plants as a whole but also the cellular functioning.

    As TheBiologista has said whatever you do chose wonít limit your options much and as you progress you will find you enjoy one over the other.

    Most Irish Universities (as far as Iím aware) tend to offer general biology, chemistry, maths and others for first year. The biology covers all aspects of biology in a brief sense and is typically a repeat with a little step up from the leaving cert course, designed to challenge those who have done it before but allow others to start biology from scratch.


    In second year they ask you to narrow down, this is where I see the greatest divide between the molecular end and the general biology side.

    But when you do get that far, you will know more about which direction to take.

    If I was to suggest two things, 1) genetics is booming and is a way forward but 2) there is no point doing it if you prefer ecology, find a job you like and youíll never work a day in your life.

    If you do have any other questions about Irish science studies/courses feel free to PM me as I am currently bang in the middle of that process myself.
    Applying to a few colleges with NUIGalway or UCC being my main choices, i like their courses best but there are others to that i'd be interested in. Applyed already but the start of May the cao can be changed again so have to make up my mind for sure soon. Applying to a few in England too but would rather somewhere closer.

    Yeah i think all of the courses i looked at were like that, they were kind of undenominated in 1st year and you choosed a few subjects like chemistry, biology etc. but after 1st year the choices get more specific and more relevent towards the degree itself. Thanks for the help goodgod3rd ill be sure to let you no if i get confuzzled with anything
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #9 Re: Ecology or genetics? 
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    39
    Quote Originally Posted by spuriousmonkey
    Study eco-evo-devo
    wasn't sure what eco-devo or evo devo was, thought it was enviornmental friendly houses/development or something.
    Looked it up and thats what im interested in learning, just didnt have the name for it, infact i wasn't really sure their was a specific name for it..

    It seems to contain everything that i was really interested in.. thanks
    Reply With Quote  
     

  11. #10  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    39
    Quote Originally Posted by paralith
    Zoology has a great future in research - just not in the private sector, unless you want to be a vetrinarian.
    Thats good news to hear, its just alot of people say that its too broad by itself, maybe they meant specialising in herpetology, ornithology or something similar.

    Dont think i'd fancy a vet, specially here in Ireland. They mostly work on farm animals, dogs and cats that kind of thing here. Think id rather get into the research side of things anyway. My aunt teaches micro-biology in Florida, trying to get in touch with her to see if she has any advice for me
    Reply With Quote  
     

  12. #11  
    Forum Ph.D.
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Dublin, Ireland
    Posts
    945
    Quote Originally Posted by NoLeafClover
    Applying to a few colleges with NUIGalway or UCC being my main choices, I like their courses best but there are others to that Iíd be interested in. Applied already but the start of May the cao can be changed again so have to make up my mind for sure soon. Applying to a few in England too but would rather somewhere closer.
    I had NUIG down until the last minute, then I changed to UCD. Only because I preferred the first year modular system in UCD better. A lot of Option to try everything. For example in my first year I did Biology, Chemistry, Maths, some physics, computer science and geology.

    As far as Galway goes, lovely city and well credited course. Don't know much about UCC.

    One thing about applying for the CAO I always felt was mad, were the panic people got in to pick choices. I just put down science, I fine tuned during the free change of mind period.

    Just to state, Above I didnít mean to sound like zoology wasn't an active research topic sorry paralith

    Well good luck anywho.
    Stumble on through life.
    Feel free to correct any false information, which unknown to me, may be included in my posts. (also - let this be a disclaimer)
    Reply With Quote  
     

  13. #12  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard paralith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    2,190
    No problem, goodgod3rd. And NoLeafClover, if you can decide on which specialty of zoology you'd like to focus on, then it's good to narrow down your major - but sometimes it takes a while to decide. I got a general biology degree, and now I'm entering into primatology for graduate work. Having a more general college major won't hurt you too much.
    Man can will nothing unless he has first understood that he must count on no one but himself; that he is alone, abandoned on earth in the midst of his infinite responsibilities, without help, with no other aim than the one he sets himself, with no other destiny than the one he forges for himself on this earth.
    ~Jean-Paul Sartre
    Reply With Quote  
     

  14. #13  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard spuriousmonkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    2,193
    Zoology isn't really hot. It's quite dead. I've seen whole zoology departments with less research money than one project in our single research group.

    Most money is to be found in biomedical research.
    "Kill them all and let God sort them out."

    - Arnaud Amalric

    http://spuriousforums.com/index.php
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •