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Thread: Interesting Biology Paper Required

  1. #1 Interesting Biology Paper Required 
    Forum Freshman Molecular's Avatar
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    Hi guys,

    I am a molecular muscle physiologist and am looking for your opinions on some interesting papers outside my field. Could you please recommend some enjoyable interesting papers in your field's or a just one you found interesting that is not related to physiology or genetics as such.

    Something along the lines of zoology or evolutionary biology would be great.

    Many thanks

    Molecular


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  3. #2  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard paralith's Avatar
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    Patterns of paternity and group fission in wild multimale mountain gorilla groups

    Abstract
    To understand variation among social systems, it is essential to know the relative reproductive success of individuals in group-living species. Particularly interesting for such studies are taxa such as mountain gorillas in which both one-male and multimale groups are common, because of the opportunity to estimate the costs and benefits to males of pursuing different reproductive strategies. We genotyped 68 individuals from two groups of multimale mountain gorilla groups in Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, Uganda to determine the distribution of paternity among the males. In both groups, the dominant male sired the majority of offspring. One group underwent a fission, and we found that the eight offspring assigned to the dominant silverback (and their mothers) remained with their father, while the two offspring of unknown paternity ended up in the small group headed by the formerly subordinate silverback. This is consistent with the proposal that the outcome of group fission in primates is not only influenced by maternal relationships among individuals, but also by patrilineal relationships. Results of this study show that subordinate males may gain reproductive benefits even while queuing for dominance status. Despite ecological differences between Bwindi and the Virunga Volcanoes, male mountain gorillas living in both populations benefit from remaining in multimale groups. Am J Phys Anthropol, 2008. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.


    How's that?


    Man can will nothing unless he has first understood that he must count on no one but himself; that he is alone, abandoned on earth in the midst of his infinite responsibilities, without help, with no other aim than the one he sets himself, with no other destiny than the one he forges for himself on this earth.
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  4. #3  
    Forum Freshman Molecular's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paralith
    Patterns of paternity and group fission in wild multimale mountain gorilla groups

    Abstract
    To understand variation among social systems, it is essential to know the relative reproductive success of individuals in group-living species. Particularly interesting for such studies are taxa such as mountain gorillas in which both one-male and multimale groups are common, because of the opportunity to estimate the costs and benefits to males of pursuing different reproductive strategies. We genotyped 68 individuals from two groups of multimale mountain gorilla groups in Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, Uganda to determine the distribution of paternity among the males. In both groups, the dominant male sired the majority of offspring. One group underwent a fission, and we found that the eight offspring assigned to the dominant silverback (and their mothers) remained with their father, while the two offspring of unknown paternity ended up in the small group headed by the formerly subordinate silverback. This is consistent with the proposal that the outcome of group fission in primates is not only influenced by maternal relationships among individuals, but also by patrilineal relationships. Results of this study show that subordinate males may gain reproductive benefits even while queuing for dominance status. Despite ecological differences between Bwindi and the Virunga Volcanoes, male mountain gorillas living in both populations benefit from remaining in multimale groups. Am J Phys Anthropol, 2008. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.


    How's that?
    Thats great.

    Thanks
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