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Thread: (Cigarette) Burn

  1. #1 (Cigarette) Burn 
    Forum Freshman Aero's Avatar
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    Let's say i get burned of a tip of a cigarette, the cells who are burned by the cigarette 'die'.

    Now it's a fact that cells in our body regenerate after time.
    But why don't scars, caused by fire, disappear ?(since they would regenerate..)

    Is it because the proteins in our cells denaturate(?) when exposed to high temperatures ?


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  3. #2  
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    http://www.burnsurvivor.com/scar_types.html

    See if this helps, and click on the different links to the types of burns. I'm not sure if it will help you though...


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  4. #3  
    Reptile Dysfunction drowsy turtle's Avatar
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    The cells are regenerated, but the proteins and other structures are only rebuilt to a certain extent, I think.
    "The major difference between a thing that might go wrong and a thing that cannot possibly go wrong is that when a thing that cannot possibly go wrong goes wrong it usually turns out to be impossible to get at or repair." ~ Douglas Adams
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  5. #4  
    Forum Freshman Aero's Avatar
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    That's a helpful link, gives some clear information about burns / scars.

    But if the proteins and other structures are only rebuilt to a certain extent, wouldn't that make the scar smaller over time since many regenerations would make it smaller and smaller every time?
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  6. #5  
    Reptile Dysfunction drowsy turtle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aero
    That's a helpful link, gives some clear information about burns / scars.

    But if the proteins and other structures are only rebuilt to a certain extent, wouldn't that make the scar smaller over time since many regenerations would make it smaller and smaller every time?
    I suppose it depends on the structure in question. collagen fibres are laid down in scars to replace those lost, but specialised cells may not grow back, if there are none of the original cells left to undergo mitosis; such as sweat glands and hair follicles in the skin.

    I also remember reading somewhere that in scars, because collagen fibres are laid down quickly and in great numbers (in wounds to the skin), they are often randomly orientated and flexibility is lost in the scar.

    Hope this helps.
    "The major difference between a thing that might go wrong and a thing that cannot possibly go wrong is that when a thing that cannot possibly go wrong goes wrong it usually turns out to be impossible to get at or repair." ~ Douglas Adams
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