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Thread: Growing Yeast for Consumption

  1. #1 Growing Yeast for Consumption 
    Forum Professor marcusclayman's Avatar
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    I'm looking for information on making nutritional yeast. I've found some info, but no step-by-step guides.

    I am reluctant to experiment on myself without at least consulting with someone experienced in this field.


    Dick, be Frank.

    Ambiguity Kills.
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  3. #2  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard i_feel_tiredsleepy's Avatar
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    Yeast are pretty difficult to culture, they're very susceptible to contamination.

    It would require some very careful sterile conditions and I would be weary of contamination if you're actually going to eat it.


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  4. #3  
    Forum Professor marcusclayman's Avatar
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    but contamination is easy to spot from what I understand, it is fuzzy whereas yeast is not

    the sterile conditions are not hard to make, i watched people do very similar things
    Dick, be Frank.

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  5. #4  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard spuriousmonkey's Avatar
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    Sterile conditions are not hard to make. The problem is that it is easy to contaminate sterile stuff.
    "Kill them all and let God sort them out."

    - Arnaud Amalric

    http://spuriousforums.com/index.php
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  6. #5  
    Forum Professor marcusclayman's Avatar
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    I think I've found all the information I need, except how much B vitamins to feed it.

    I've seen people do this on their kitchen table, a candle is really all you need, but my standards are a little higher. For convenience mainly I will be using a small walk in closet as my laboratory. Easy to sterilize and I can store everything I will ever use in there.
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  7. #6  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard i_feel_tiredsleepy's Avatar
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    I think yeast may be able to produce B vitamins on their own, but I don't know for sure.
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  8. #7  
    Forum Professor marcusclayman's Avatar
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    Yeah I thought that too, but I read that during their production they need to be fed B vitamins, I don't know how much of which ones.

    Based on how capitalism works and comparing the price of yeast to the price of B complex pills, It would seem as though yeast does create some if not most of it's own B vitamins, but needs some to start with. This is not a very scientific approach, but why would companies go out of their way to make a very cheep product and use a more valuable product to do it with? I don't see that happening.

    As long as the yeast makes more B vitamins than I feed them, I might be able to feed the dead yeast to the live yeast... and thus the blob came to be!
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  9. #8  
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    Yeasts (whterh Saccharomyces cerevisiae in particular or yeast-like fungi in general) are not difficult to culture, no more so than E. coli or staph. But you do have to follow aspectic technique. If you haven't that capability - don't try it for consumption. You'll generate trash and may make yourself ill.

    If you talking casually - as in your kitchen, I suggest you buy some commercial yeast extract.

    For info on growth, look up S. cerevisiae in Lodders "The Yeasts" - it will tell you the necessary cofactors and vitamins.
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  10. #9  
    Forum Professor marcusclayman's Avatar
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    Great, big help... I think I have it all figured out, but you know, I forgot to research the basics. Thanks!

    1: making a sterile environment is not hard, you just can't do it half assed
    2: contamination is very visible
    3: yeast is pasteurized before eating

    ... im not too worried
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  11. #10  
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    You can't count on contamination being "visible" - in terms of obvious mold growth. Bacteria and other yeast could well give a turbid broth and even colonies indistinguishable from S. cerevisiae.
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