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Thread: How do cancerous tumors form in the brain?

  1. #1 How do cancerous tumors form in the brain? 
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    What happens to the cells (in the brain) as a cancerous tumor is formed? What are the stages - from stage 1 onwards- how cells go from being healthy and regular to being damaged (resulting in a tumor)? Keeping in mind that this is a tumor formed in the brain and not cancer spread from another part of the body.
    In addition - Are there any helpful medical sources which offer a clear explanation on this.

    Thank you.


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  3. #2  
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    Mutations in microRNAs can lead to activation of oncogenes (Ras, Raf,EGFR, VEGFR, PDGFR, c-Sis, Ras protein, myc gene as well as cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases). Expression of the genes promotes malignant cancer cells. Tumor suppressor genes ( APC, CD95, p53, etc) are often also mutated. What often happens is that oncogenes cause cells to proliferate and protect them against apoptosis (programmed cell death). Inactivation of tumor suppressor genes follow. Many gene changes often occur. An accumulation of these mutations over the course of time may take place before a cancer eventually forms. Mutation of the APC gene is related to colon cancer. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are especially associated with breast cancer. Li-Fraumeni syndrome is characterized by causing numerous tumors like breast cancer, soft tissue sarcoma, and brain tumors due to mutations of the p53 gene. I cannot think of specific gene at the moment specifically associated with brain cancer.


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  4. #3  
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    What I really want to know is how non-cancerous tumours form in the brain.
    "Kill them all and let God sort them out."

    - Arnaud Amalric

    http://spuriousforums.com/index.php
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  5. #4  
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    Is this how tumors generally form?
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  6. #5  
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    No, generally there are histological precancerous states or dysplastic states which have various causes and features before becoming neoplastic and malignant/cancerous.

    What is interesting about brain tumors is that we dont know of any such dysplastic precancerous states.
    However there are specific genetic syndromes which can cause brain tumours such as neurofibromatosis and von hippel lindau etc...
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  7. #6  
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    No, generally there are histological precancerous states or dysplastic states which have various causes and features before becoming neoplastic and malignant/cancerous.
    Can you describe these precancerous states?
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  8. #7  
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    No thats the point there are none for brain tumours.

    If you wanted me to talk about other areas it depends on the system.
    Myelodysplasia is a preleukaemic state.
    Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia is a precancerous state of the cervix.
    Barrett's oesophagus which is a metaplastic change can be considered precancerous with regards to the oesophagus.
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