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Thread: Sorry, that's not my leg!

  1. #1 Sorry, that's not my leg! 
    Forum Freshman asxz's Avatar
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    With todays science, you can re-attatch something like a finger, if it has been kept in the right conditions. Could you do this with something like a limb? Would it be possible to re-attatch another persons limb, if it were cut off in the exact same place as yours? Discuss!


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  3. #2  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard spuriousmonkey's Avatar
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    Of course you can.

    It might die though. And it might not be functional. And it might be against the law.


    "Kill them all and let God sort them out."

    - Arnaud Amalric

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  4. #3  
    Forum Masters Degree samcdkey's Avatar
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    How to reattach severed body parts


    Not every part of the body is as resilient as the finger. Muscle tends to have a faster metabolism than other kinds of tissue, so a severed arm or leg will deteriorate more quickly than your pinkie (a full limb must be reattached within six hours to 12 hours). Cartilage has a particularly slow metabolism, so a severed ear or nose can be quite durable. The types of tissues in the penis actually make it an excellent candidate for longer stretches in the ice bucket.

    The first step in reattaching a body part is to restore blood flow by reconnecting the arteries. For the procedure to work, the severed tissue must be alive, and the severed arteries must be large enough to manipulate using microsurgical techniques. The blood vessels in the finger are about one or 1.5 millimeters wide (depending on where you cut); vessels in the penis tend to be somewhat bigger and easier to work with.

    You also need to reattach the veins, or blood won't be able to flow out of the severed part. Without a conduit for outflow, the body part will swell, which can cause tissue damage. When veins can't be sewn up right away, surgeons apply live leeches. A single leech can suck up 10 cubic centimeters of blood from a severed penis; a chemical in its saliva, hirudin, keeps blood from clotting and allows continued drainage.

    Tendons, bone, and nerves must also be reattached. In general, the cleaner the cut, the more simple the operation. Ears, which have small arteries and which, when severed, are often ripped off or bitten off, tend to be tricky.
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  5. #4  
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    only if it was the same color
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