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Thread: mold problem

  1. #1 mold problem 
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    I have a mold problem by a radiator in my bedroom and i was wandering if there is a cheap and efficient way to kill it and prevent it coming back.
    Could somebody please tell me a way of doing this with house hold stuff (or easy to access)
    Thank You


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  3. #2  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard paralith's Avatar
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    You probably have a leak somewhere. Mold requires moisture; if you dry the area completely the mold won't be able to grow. That's why basements tend to smell moldy. Depending on what's leaking, there may not be a cheap and easy way to take care of it.


    Man can will nothing unless he has first understood that he must count on no one but himself; that he is alone, abandoned on earth in the midst of his infinite responsibilities, without help, with no other aim than the one he sets himself, with no other destiny than the one he forges for himself on this earth.
    ~Jean-Paul Sartre
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  4. #3  
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    the radiator is never used so it is constantly cold could condensation be the moisture and could i use something like salt to kill or if not would household bleach work?
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  5. #4  
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    Is the radiator connected to your central heating system? If so, it may be leaking even though you never turn it on. Check all the valves etc.
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  6. #5  
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    Quote Originally Posted by rhysboi1991
    the radiator is never used so it is constantly cold could condensation be the moisture and could i use something like salt to kill or if not would household bleach work?
    The point is that if you don't take care of the moisture problem, after you kill what's there more will grow. There is a certain amount of mold spores in the air, there's no getting around that - if they find a nice place to grow, they'll grow. And somehow I don't think constantly bleaching and salting your wall will be very good for it in the long run.
    Man can will nothing unless he has first understood that he must count on no one but himself; that he is alone, abandoned on earth in the midst of his infinite responsibilities, without help, with no other aim than the one he sets himself, with no other destiny than the one he forges for himself on this earth.
    ~Jean-Paul Sartre
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  7. #6  
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    Moulds are more easily controlled by altering the pH of the environment rather than osmolarity. Instead of salt, try sodium bicarb - baking soda. A light periodic dusting with the stuff should raise the pH and knock down the mould substantially.
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  8. #7  
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    Molds grow well if there is moisture, a food supply, darkness, oxygen, and a lack of toxins. Controlling molds involves affecting one of these variables.
    1. Keeping the area dry.
    2. Cleaning the surface to remove possible food. Even a thin film of grease can feed a mold.
    3. Irradiating with light - preferably UV
    4. Keeping the area anoxic.
    5. Applying a suitable toxin.

    Some of these tactics are complex or impractical. The best method is bleach. Check to see if there is anything that bleach will damage. Fabrics, etc are damaged by bleach. Even wallpaper can be damaged. However, a painted surface should be OK, or any smooth surface, such as plastic, ceramic, metal etc.

    Dilute the bleach, and wear gloves, say 5 of water to 1 of bleach. Bleach is corrosive to human skin, so if it splashes on your skin, wash it off immediately. Wipe it over the mouldy surface. This does two things. It kills the mold, and it 'digests' organics on the surface, removing a possible food supply.

    There are other fungicides that are better than bleach, but these are not generally available to ordinary people. The bleach treatment will do the trick, but may need to be repeated every few months.

    If you cannot use bleach, due to vulnerable fabrics or other surfaces, get some antiseptic that contains a quaternary ammonium compound, such as benzalkonium chloride. Dilute this in water, and scrub the moldy surface with the solution. This is not as good as bleach and requires more scrubbing, and will not last as long.
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