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Thread: Genome Mapping

  1. #1 Genome Mapping 
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    Xq28 on chromosome X...the proposed "gay gene"

    HER1, HER2 - chromosome 7- mutations in these genes can lead to breast and other cancers

    genes active in embryonic stem cells (Oct4 (chrom 6), Sox2 (chrom 3), c-myc (chrom 15), Klf4 (chrom 9), used to make induced pluripotent stem cells

    CD20- found on B-cell lymphomas, hairy cell leukemia, and B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia. It is also found on skin/melanoma cancer stem cells...found on chromosome 11

    VEGF's- several diff genes-They are important signaling proteins involved in both vasculogenesis (the de novo formation of the embryonic circulatory system) and angiogenesis (the growth of blood vessels from pre-existing vasculature)...may help stop spread of cancer to block this protein

    -largest chromosome-1..smallest-21

    -chromosome 2 is a fusion of 2 chromosomes

    -about 30,000 genes in human genome

    -The Huntingtin gene (HTT) is located on the short arm of chromosome 4- CAG repeats-35 times repeated or less and you are fine.39 times or more..at old age you will lose balance, many intellectual abilities, depression, and have jerky limbs. Wolf-Hirschorn disease is also located on this gene. The most common abnormalities seen include severe to profound mental retardation, microcephaly (small head), seizures, poor muscle tone, and cleft lip and/or cleft palate. Characteristic facial features, include strabismus, hypertelorism, down-turned "fishlike" mouth, short upper lip and philtrum, small chin, ear tags or pits, and cranial asymmetry. Occasional abnormalities include heart defects, hypospadias, scoliosis (oddly curved spine), ptosis (lazy eye), fused teeth, hearing loss, delayed bone age, low hairline with webbed neck, and renal anomalies.


    The ADRB2 gene on chromosome 5 is intronless( introns are DNA regions in a gene that are not translated into proteins). Different polymorphic forms, point mutations, and/or downregulation of this gene are associated with nocturnal asthma, obesity and type 2 diabetes. Deals with broncodilation and constriction.

    on chromosome 6, IGF2R-smart kids have a diff sequence on this gene than average people

    DAX on X chromosome, SRY on Y. SRY makes men men.

    Gene on chromosome 9 to determine blood type

    on chromosome 7-CFTR- causes cystic fibrosis-Cystic fibrosis is one of the most common life-shortening, genetic diseases. In the United States, 1 in 4,000 children are born with CF..it causes mucous builup in multiple systems, especially the lungs

    on chromosome 6-The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a large genomic region or gene family found in most vertebrates. It is the most gene-dense region of the mammalian genome and plays an important role in the immune system, autoimmunity, and reproductive success. The proteins encoded by the MHC are expressed on the surface of cells in all jawed vertebrates, and display both self antigens (peptide fragments from the cell itself) and nonself antigens (e.g. fragments of invading microorganisms) to a type of white blood cell called a T cell that has the capacity to kill or co-ordinate the killing of pathogens, infected or malfunctioning cells.

    CYP17 on chromosome 10-makes an enzyme that enables body to convert cholesterol to cortisol, testosterone and oestradiol (produces estrogen)

    on chromosome 11- D4DR- recipe for dopamine receptor protein-latches to dopamine...shortage of dopamine which controls blood flow to brain among other things, effects personality..makes people indecisive

    Homeotic genes, also known as Hox genes, specify the anterior-posterior axis and segment identity of metazoan organisms during early embryonic development. These genes are critical for the proper number and placement of embryonic segment structures (such as legs, antennae, and eyes).

    TEP1 on chromosome 14-This gene product is a component of the ribonucleoprotein complex responsible for telomerase activity which catalyzes the addition of new telomeres on the chromosome ends. The telomerase-associated proteins are conserved from ciliates to humans

    IGF2 on chromosome 11-The major role of IGF2 is as a growth promoting hormone during gestation. It is paternally imprinted. H19 is a maternal imprinting gene that opposes IGF2. Both are used in development of the fetus.

    CREB genes- CREB has many functions in many different organs although most of its functions have been studied in relation to the brain. CREB proteins in neurons are thought to be involved in the formation of long-term memories; this has been shown in the marine snail Aplysia, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, and in rats. They are necessary for the late stage of long term potentiation.

    chromosome 17- p53-(also known as protein 53 or tumor protein 53), is a transcription factor which in humans is encoded by the TP53 gene.[1][2][3] p53 is important in multicellular organisms, where it regulates the cell cycle and thus functions as a tumor suppressor that is involved in preventing cancer. As such, p53 has been described as "the guardian of the genome," "the guardian angel gene," and the "master watchman," referring to its role in conserving stability by preventing genome mutation...in 55 % of all cancers TP53 broken. In colorectal cancer, several mutations occer..the first in a tumor suppressor APC, then RAS, then unidentified gene, then TP53..usually fatal

    ADA deficiency is due to a lack of the enzyme adenosine deaminase coded for by a gene on chromosome 20. There is an accumulation of deoxyadenosine, which causes an increase in S-adenosylhomocysteine; both substances are toxic to immature lymphocytes, which thus fail to mature. As a result, the immune system is severely compromised or completely lacking.

    APOE on chromosome 19- VLDL needs to lose triglycerides...APOE effects an introduction between VLDL (very low density lipoprotein-precursor to "bad" cholesterol) and a receptor on a cell that needs some triglycerides...if APOE is not working, cholesterol can stay in blood and build in arteries

    chromosome 21- ppl born with extra chromosome have down's syndrome

    chromosome 22-Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's), Methemoglobinemia (causes hypoxia and anemia), Li-Fraumeni syndrome ...Li-Fraumeni syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant hereditary disorder. It is named after Frederick Pei Li and Joseph F. Fraumeni, Jr., the American physicians who first recognized and described the syndrome. Li-Fraumeni syndrome increases greatly the susceptibility to cancer. The syndrome is linked to germline mutations of the p53 tumor suppressor gene, which normally helps control cell growth. Mutations can be inherited or can arise de novo early in embryogenesis or in one of the parent's germ cells. ersons with LFS are at risk for a wide range of malignancies, with particularly high occurrences of breast cancer, brain tumors, acute leukemia, soft tissue sarcomas, bone sarcomas, and adrenal cortical carcinoma. What makes Li-Fraumeni Syndrome unusual is that many of cancers are involved... cancer often strikes at a young age, and cancer often strikes several times throughout the life of an affected person...very rare
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    PLEASE EXPAND BY ADDING GENES TO THIS DATABASE


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    Forum Cosmic Wizard paralith's Avatar
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    gottspieler, I'm not sure what your intention is in forming a list of known genes in a science forum thread. There are whole databases devoted to this information, most notably NCBI, and without the organization of a dedicated website this will quickly become a massive list that no one wants to read through.


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  4. #3  
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    What does any of this have to do with mapping?
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    Forum Sophomore Tharghana's Avatar
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    Xq28 on chromosome X...the proposed "gay gene"
    put that one in the homosexual Subject.
    www.periodicvideos.com - A Great Site

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  6. #5  
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    Quote Originally Posted by paralith
    gottspieler, I'm not sure what your intention is in forming a list of known genes in a science forum thread. There are whole databases devoted to this information, most notably NCBI, and without the organization of a dedicated website this will quickly become a massive list that no one wants to read through.
    I simply wanted to list some of the most common genes discussed, not every gene of the human genome. Most of them are from Matt Ridley's book "Genome".
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  7. #6  
    Moderator Moderator TheBiologista's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gottspieler
    Quote Originally Posted by paralith
    gottspieler, I'm not sure what your intention is in forming a list of known genes in a science forum thread. There are whole databases devoted to this information, most notably NCBI, and without the organization of a dedicated website this will quickly become a massive list that no one wants to read through.
    I simply wanted to list some of the most common genes discussed, not every gene of the human genome.
    Yeah, but why? Surely a more interesting topic would be a discussion of some specific gene or mutation? The thread doesn't really serve a purpose.
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  8. #7  
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    Maybe the thread doesn't serve a purpose in your mind but it may to others. Whether or not something "serves a purpose" is highly subjective. Some might appreciate having this information at their disposal more readily than having to search several sites or read an entire book or two. Granted, a database exists yet it is more convienient to read a synopsis of a specific gene or set of genes than what they provide. The reason I like to have the information is that I can review the information I've forgotten after reading a book. We can use this information as a starting point for other threads discussing the current research on specific genes and how initial hypotheses were confirmed or proven false.
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