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Thread: biology ,anatomy and geometry

  1. #1 biology ,anatomy and geometry 
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    Hi :

    I'm working in one little bit speculative ground . relationship

    between biology and geometry . in http://biologygeometry.blogspot.com

    I explain preliminary accounts of that .

    also in forum and groups at nature-network : biology and geometry

    you're wellcome .


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  3. #2  
    Moderator Moderator TheBiologista's Avatar
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    I took a look but I have to say the material is not immediately approachable. Care to give us an outline here?


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  4. #3  
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBiologista
    I took a look but I have to say the material is not immediately approachable. Care to give us an outline here?
    You are giving Alberto too much credit. It's just gobbledygook.
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  5. #4  
    Moderator Moderator TheBiologista's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370
    Quote Originally Posted by TheBiologista
    I took a look but I have to say the material is not immediately approachable. Care to give us an outline here?
    You are giving Alberto too much credit. It's just gobbledygook.
    I figured I'd give him the benefit of the doubt. It sure looks pretty fishy.
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  6. #5 invitation 
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    We have discussion forum at

    http://network.nature.com/groups/acoe/forum/topics

    May be someone are interested in .

    debunkers are wellcome!
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  7. #6  
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    Well I looked at it . . . you know there's a lot of geometry in nature. Sunflower seeds organize according to Fibonacci numbers, clouds are scale invariant (fractals), the geometry of the trachea in the lungs and kidney tubes are also fractal-like. Tons more. Mandelbrot wrote a whole book on the subject called "The Fractal Geometry of Nature", Rene' Thom wrote "Structural Stability and Morphogenesis" which attempts to describe much of the geometry of nature in terms of dynamics although is virtually impossible to read unless you're strong in Topology and other math.

    Really I think if you're interested in the geometry of nature, you need to study differential equations, non-linear dynamics, and Fractal geometry. "Chaos and Fractals" by Peitgen is another good book. "Self-Organization in Biological Systems" is another one.
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  8. #7  
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    THANKS ZETAMAN FOR YOUR ADVICES . VERY INTERESTING .
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  9. #8 Re: biology ,anatomy and geometry 
    Forum Professor sunshinewarrior's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alberto
    Hi :

    I'm working in one little bit speculative ground . relationship

    between biology and geometry . in http://biologygeometry.blogspot.com

    I explain preliminary accounts of that .

    also in forum and groups at nature-network : biology and geometry

    you're wellcome .
    A further piece of advice, Alberto.

    A well known statistical fallacy is one of 'rounding off' (or rather not, as the case may be).

    If we take 'average' measured numbers to three significant figures, and then use arithmetic/algebraic operators on them in conjunction with constants taken to five significant figures, the results we get will look spuriously accurate. They are not actually accurate to 5 significant figures, and are likelier only to be reliable to 2 significant figures (given the rounding off in both numbers).

    But with just two significant figures to play with, we might as well say that the ratio of the kilometre to the mile reflects the Golden Mean (both rounding up to 1.6 as they do), but it would really not be meaningful to anybody but those who heal by the power of crystals that have been energised by exposure to the helical forces coming down from the rotating moon.

    The reason I mention this is that a quick look at the site to which you have linked appears to show that you have taken naturally measured numbers (ages of horses etc) and then used, for instance, the square root of 2 (one of my favourite number, BTW) to five significant places. The two do not really compute, I think, but are reminiscent of the old joke:

    An excited young future palaentologist, at the Natural History Museum, is staring up at a dinosaur skeleton and asks the guard how old it is.

    "72 million and seven years," the guard replies, smugly.

    "Wow!" exclaims the YFP. "How do you know it so accurately?"

    "Well," replies the guard. "When I joined this place 7 years ago, they told me it was 72 million years old, and I know how to do my sums. I just added!"
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  10. #9 Re: invitation 
    Forum Cosmic Wizard spuriousmonkey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alberto
    We have discussion forum at

    http://network.nature.com/groups/acoe/forum/topics

    May be someone are interested in .

    debunkers are wellcome!
    If science needs debunking it isn't science.


    I do know a nice article that shows the law of 'geometry' in teeth though.
    "Kill them all and let God sort them out."

    - Arnaud Amalric

    http://spuriousforums.com/index.php
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