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Thread: an i dea for a invetion

  1. #1 an i dea for a invetion 
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    as you Biologists well know that you constatly use the microscope constalty looking at microbes such as bacteria, viruses, and particulate mater. this also leads inot the create of nanobots as well

    but i have an idea that might chage the way you look at things
    the nanoscope, not my chosen name of course, but it lets you see things such as DNA, mircobacteria, and other smaller organisms. I'd consdier this in a hope for a discorvery.

    NOTE: this does not exist but i believe it can be made, with giveng explorative time and patience.

    Oh and please reply :wink:


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  3. #2 forward 
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    it should work basicly with sensative fiber optics and should work as functional as a microscope


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  4. #3  
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    There is no such thing as a nanobot. As soon as somebody invents a nanobot, maybe you could start thinking about a nanobot with a microscope.
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  5. #4  
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    the electron microscope can see objects as small as even atoms.
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  6. #5  
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    And there are devices which can see smaller than the electro microscope, however you haven't really suggestd anything, all you've said is I have an invention, the invention is something that can see smaller than what we already have... can you see why that isn't the most creative idea?!
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  7. #6  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard i_feel_tiredsleepy's Avatar
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    Haha, he invented the electron microscope, that would have been news in the 50s.
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  8. #7  
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    Does this device run on a perpetual motion energy device? I am highly interested in supporting your efforts if it does!
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  9. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by NeptuneCircle
    the electron microscope can see objects as small as even atoms.
    Electron microscopes can see fine particules and objects, e.g blood cells, but no were near small enough to see atoms or even extremely large molecules.
    Ron Burgandy - It's so damn hot...Milk was a bad choice.
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  10. #9  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard i_feel_tiredsleepy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Verybadman
    Quote Originally Posted by NeptuneCircle
    the electron microscope can see objects as small as even atoms.
    Electron microscopes can see fine particules and objects, e.g blood cells, but no were near small enough to see atoms or even extremely large molecules.
    You can see blood cells with a light microscope >.>

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HRTEM
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  11. #10  
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    AGGRED ELECTRON MICROSCOPE CAN VISUALISE ATOMS THAT IS SCANNING TUNNELING MICROSCOPE
    AND BLOOD CELLS CAN BE SEEN WIN LIGHT MICROSCOPE EVEN
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  12. #11  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Verybadman
    Electron microscopes can see fine particules and objects, e.g blood cells, but no were near small enough to see atoms or even extremely large molecules.
    This turns out to be quite incorrect.
    http://www.physorg.com/news122830882.html

    Or even earlier, from 2002
    http://www-03.ibm.com/press/us/en/pr...ease/22057.wss

    And as for 'seeing' large molecules, consider this:
    http://zsgenetics.com/

    Here is a quote from the link:
    This is an early ZSG image, taken with a 30 year old, low-resolution, Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). The sample is atomically-labeled DNA, 23,000 base-pairs long, 2 nano-meters wide.
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  13. #12  
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    himanshu is on the right track, the STM (Scanning Tunneling Microscope) shows up atoms quite clearly. It works by placing a (usually) tungsten tip in extreme proximity to the sample and passing electrons through the space in between. Ideally the tungsten tip is 1 atom thick at the point.

    The best analogy is that of running your finger over a eggs in a box. As the tip passes over the sample it maps the 'terrain'; this is accomplished by keeping the current at a constant, this controls the height of the tip. The image of the atoms appears as a series of bumps allowing clear distinction between atoms of different sizes to be made. It is even possible to move these atoms around, so the future is bright for manipulation at the atomic level. Think smaller :wink:.
    Dramatisation; may not have happened.
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