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Thread: Manipulating human nature-Marketing inspires impulsivity

  1. #1 Manipulating human nature-Marketing inspires impulsivity 
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    I recently wrote an article on the new bankruptcy laws, and how they rip off the lower-middle working class of America. Part of my argument was although personal responsibility is a key factor is financial judgment, marketing pressure is also to blame. Market researchers spend their careers learning new ways in pressuring consumers to continually buy and spend, or be subjected to social rejection. In light of this, how can the common person chose social isolation over financial responsibility? It has been proven and generally accepted among sociologists that human beings that become separated from the group become unstable and even mentally ill. The comparison is not, I believe all that extreme. Can any of you honestly say they met a person without a cell phone or computer and didn't think them irresponsible or out-of-touch? So, where does the majority of the blame lie?

    Here's a link to my article:

    http://www.associatedcontent.com/art...ing.html?cat=3


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    Forum Isotope Bunbury's Avatar
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    Can any of you honestly say they met a person without a cell phone or computer and didn't think them irresponsible or out-of-touch?
    Well, there's my mum.


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    WYSIWYG Moderator marnixR's Avatar
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    there are other ways of communicating with people than through a mobile phone or via a forum, like talking to them face to face

    i do have a mobile phone + hardly ever use it
    i don't feel that i need to be reachable every single minute of the day + people who want to contact me know there are other ways to get through
    "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away." (Philip K. Dick)
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    Quote Originally Posted by marnixR
    there are other ways of communicating with people than through a mobile phone or via a forum, like talking to them face to face

    i do have a mobile phone + hardly ever use it
    i don't feel that i need to be reachable every single minute of the day + people who want to contact me know there are other ways to get through
    A marvelous point, at least some of us believe so.
    "Carmex doesn't heal cold sores, but it does make them shiny and more noticeable." ~Mitch Hedberg, RIP 2005 for accidental drug overdose
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    Well, when I meet people with no mobilephone or a computer, I dont think they´re "weird" because they dont consume, I simply cannot imagine a life without it. Because of the practical use they are to me.

    It has nothing to do with consuming in that example, atleast not for me.

    But I find it somewhat scary how much I´ve become reliant on mobilephone, if I forget it at home I feel very unsecure about alot of stuff. Like if I´ve decided a time to meet someone, unless I have my phone it seems certain they wont show up. Ofcourse its absurd.. but it´s a weird feeling
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    I enjoyed your article. In the UK there has been a social trend toward the glorification of the notion of celebrity, which along with all the other image markets, like women's fashion (the need to be a size 0!) are creating new attitudes about how we must appear to be accepted. The ability to do this is perhaps driven by wealth or the perception of it and hence your well made points about this need driving a large demographic into financial insolvency. My own view is linked to research that I am conducting that draws on the notion that society is struggling to keep pace with technological advancement. Whereas the industrial revolution happened over several decades and society adopted the benefits that it created similarly over a long period, the information revolution is far more dynamic. The class boundaries that existed in the late 18th, early 19th centuries are gone and now anyone with access to credit can gain immediate access to the latest technology. The blame could therefore be leveled at the credit industry for being irresponsible in over-lending. I think that this is a factor, but not the root cause. The creation of an information based society is not some passing fad, but a seed change in the nature of society that requires you to be 'plugged in' to participate. As communications networks become increasingly integrated and computers become increasingly pervasive there is a growing risk, in my view, of the creation of a new class system defined by ability to access the digital data network.
    I love my iMac
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    Quote Originally Posted by Highball
    I enjoyed your article. In the UK there has been a social trend toward the glorification of the notion of celebrity, which along with all the other image markets, like women's fashion (the need to be a size 0!) are creating new attitudes about how we must appear to be accepted. The ability to do this is perhaps driven by wealth or the perception of it and hence your well made points about this need driving a large demographic into financial insolvency. My own view is linked to research that I am conducting that draws on the notion that society is struggling to keep pace with technological advancement. Whereas the industrial revolution happened over several decades and society adopted the benefits that it created similarly over a long period, the information revolution is far more dynamic. The class boundaries that existed in the late 18th, early 19th centuries are gone and now anyone with access to credit can gain immediate access to the latest technology. The blame could therefore be leveled at the credit industry for being irresponsible in over-lending. I think that this is a factor, but not the root cause. The creation of an information based society is not some passing fad, but a seed change in the nature of society that requires you to be 'plugged in' to participate. As communications networks become increasingly integrated and computers become increasingly pervasive there is a growing risk, in my view, of the creation of a new class system defined by ability to access the digital data network.
    I completely agree, in fact creditors won't blink an eye at loaning a massive sum of money to an average Joe- but try to apply for a small loan and you have a host of checks and factors weighed against you. That just proves that they are irresponsibly loaning money in huge amounts for their own benefit. For shame.
    "Carmex doesn't heal cold sores, but it does make them shiny and more noticeable." ~Mitch Hedberg, RIP 2005 for accidental drug overdose
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