Notices
Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Desiring sadness

  1. #1 Desiring sadness 
    Moderator Moderator AlexP's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    1,838
    Is there any kind of condition where a person wants to feel sad?


    "There is a kind of lazy pleasure in useless and out-of-the-way erudition." -Jorge Luis Borges
    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2 Re: Desiring sadness 
    Forum Professor sunshinewarrior's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    London
    Posts
    1,525
    Quote Originally Posted by Chemboy
    Is there any kind of condition where a person wants to feel sad?
    Yup. Late teen undergraduate syndrome: when the only cool thing is to be depressed, listening to Leonard Cohen whenever possible, smoking and drinking tea whilst watching the rain falling in the quadrangle.


    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard paralith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    2,190
    This isn't from a professional source, so don't quote me on this, but a literature teacher of mine once said something to that effect that I've always remembered. She said that sometimes it's hard for a person to let go of negative aspects of their personality, because even though they're negative, it's still a part of them. It's hard to let go of something that's been a part of who you are for a long time. So if sadness has been a dominant factor in your life for a long time, you might, after a fashion, "miss" being sad. Or be somewhat nostalgic about it, at least.

    I've personally experienced a little bit of that in my lifetime, so I think it's probably a fairly accurate statement.
    Man can will nothing unless he has first understood that he must count on no one but himself; that he is alone, abandoned on earth in the midst of his infinite responsibilities, without help, with no other aim than the one he sets himself, with no other destiny than the one he forges for himself on this earth.
    ~Jean-Paul Sartre
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4 Re: Desiring sadness 
    Forum Cosmic Wizard paralith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    2,190
    Quote Originally Posted by sunshinewarrio
    Quote Originally Posted by Chemboy
    Is there any kind of condition where a person wants to feel sad?
    Yup. Late teen undergraduate syndrome: when the only cool thing is to be depressed, listening to Leonard Cohen whenever possible, smoking and drinking tea whilst watching the rain falling in the quadrangle.
    hahaha. of course! how could I forget the emo culture?

    Man can will nothing unless he has first understood that he must count on no one but himself; that he is alone, abandoned on earth in the midst of his infinite responsibilities, without help, with no other aim than the one he sets himself, with no other destiny than the one he forges for himself on this earth.
    ~Jean-Paul Sartre
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Guest
    There are a variety of psychological problems that can make you want to feel depressed. Ranging from learned helplessness, to extreme version of depression. Low self esteem can be thrown into this mix as well to create a rather chaotic brew.

    One of the common methods the everyday person applies is "letting go" of "negative aspects of their personality". The problem with this is that it generally goes unresolved. You may not feel the problem anymore, but the effects of it will still linger. You just wont know why.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Administrator KALSTER's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    South Africa
    Posts
    8,231
    I have heard that some, or most, people "play the patient" in situations where they are injured or ill. Is it possible that a person might Want to be sad in order to solicit some sympathy and attention from someone?
    Disclaimer: I do not declare myself to be an expert on ANY subject. If I state something as fact that is obviously wrong, please don't hesitate to correct me. I welcome such corrections in an attempt to be as truthful and accurate as possible.

    "Gullibility kills" - Carl Sagan
    "All people know the same truth. Our lives consist of how we chose to distort it." - Harry Block
    "It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." - Aristotle
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7  
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by KALSTER
    I have heard that some, or most, people "play the patient" in situations where they are injured or ill. Is it possible that a person might Want to be sad in order to solicit some sympathy and attention from someone?
    Sometimes. But you must also be aware that it's a method of self punishment.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #8  
    Administrator KALSTER's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    South Africa
    Posts
    8,231
    You mean like when the sadness is mixed with feelings of guilt and then they incite people they attract into reprimanding them. Or alternatively by voicing their guilt, they try and get these people to rationalize the situation in order to lessen the guilt that they had assigned to themselves.
    Disclaimer: I do not declare myself to be an expert on ANY subject. If I state something as fact that is obviously wrong, please don't hesitate to correct me. I welcome such corrections in an attempt to be as truthful and accurate as possible.

    "Gullibility kills" - Carl Sagan
    "All people know the same truth. Our lives consist of how we chose to distort it." - Harry Block
    "It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." - Aristotle
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #9  
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by KALSTER
    You mean like when the sadness is mixed with feelings of guilt and then they incite people they attract into reprimanding them. Or alternatively by voicing their guilt, they try and get these people to rationalize the situation in order to lessen the guilt that they had assigned to themselves.
    Close. Sadness in general can create guilt. Guilt is, in effect, the first step towards punishing yourself. They don't NEED to incite others into reprimanding them, they can do that themselves. In fact, in some cases they isolate themselves to avoid further pain than they receive from their own mind.

    On the attention spectrum, people generally avoid seriously hurting themselves. This includes going too far into guilt. While sometimes it can happen, it leads to the above rather than continued search for attention.

    Personally I keep my eye out for the latter most. They're the serious cases. Not in it for simple peer acceptance. They're the most ignored, generalized, and unknown group. Yet I find them increasingly common. Scary, really, as most psychologists will probably fail to help them.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  11. #10  
    Administrator KALSTER's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    South Africa
    Posts
    8,231
    most psychologists will probably fail to help them.
    As a result of being unable to correctly identify the problem? I suppose, proportionally, there are just as many inept psychologists as in any profession.

    Personally I keep my eye out for the latter most.
    Do you mean the latter of mine or your examples? If mine, are you talking about someone that are feeling guilt towards consequences of some agenda they are advancing? And if yours, what do you mean?
    Disclaimer: I do not declare myself to be an expert on ANY subject. If I state something as fact that is obviously wrong, please don't hesitate to correct me. I welcome such corrections in an attempt to be as truthful and accurate as possible.

    "Gullibility kills" - Carl Sagan
    "All people know the same truth. Our lives consist of how we chose to distort it." - Harry Block
    "It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." - Aristotle
    Reply With Quote  
     

  12. #11  
    Guest
    I mean keep an eye out for the ones most psychologists will fail to help.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  13. #12  
    Forum Professor
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1,120
    If being 'sad' has reaped success over a period of time , perhaps in childhood in obtaining attention, then it will become a desireable trait and can be habit forming.
    'Time is the space between birth and death' by me.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  14. #13  
    Moderator Moderator AlexP's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    1,838
    thanks for the replies everyone. One reason I see for wanting to feel sad is just to have something to preoccupy oneself with, something to think about, something to 'mope' over.
    "There is a kind of lazy pleasure in useless and out-of-the-way erudition." -Jorge Luis Borges
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •