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Thread: Why does a song sound bad if you listen to it too much?

  1. #1 Why does a song sound bad if you listen to it too much? 
    Forum Senior Weterman's Avatar
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    5 years ago, certain songs sounded the best. Now, they don't sound as good. Why is this? It sucks, cause if I over listen a song I really like, I won;t like it anymore. Why does this happen?


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    Forum Radioactive Isotope sculptor's Avatar
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    you're young
    as you mature, your tastes mature along with you
    enjoy it


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    I enjoy just about every I did when I was younger...for those interested they were bands like Emerson Lake and Palmer, Jethro Tull, Yes, Allen Parson's project, Moody Blues, Heart, Kansas, Queen. I later came to love the newer country music as exemplified by Garth Brooks, The Judds, and newer rock bands like "3 doors down, Hootie and the blow fish, Shinedown" Now I enjoy the acoustics of John Mayer and Dave Mathews. Once in a while I'll also go back and listen to folk music, occasionally taking out my dulcimer to play along or my fife to do a few colonial refrains.

    So the long and short of it, at least in my case, my taste didn't' so much change but expand as I got older.
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    What if he is like 65?
    It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.
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    Not 65, his page says he's 15.

    My view is that, in another 5 years, some of the stuff you've now tired of will gain back a bit of the liking they've now lost. The rest you'll just dismiss as 'kid stuff' and never bother with it again.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
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    Forum Professor pyoko's Avatar
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    OK. But what if he was 65? What logic can we apply as to the why of the OP?
    It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.
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    If he were? Well, people are different.

    My mum is waaaay over 65 (89 next month) and she's always been a bit odd about music. She didn't like Bing Crosby until Frank Sinatra arrived on the scene. She didn't like Sinatra until Guy Mitchell and Johnny Ray were heard on the radio. She's never taken to Elvis Presley, nor the Rolling Stones. Funnily enough, the only popular musicians she ever liked on first hearing were ... The Beatles.

    Unlike my mother, my kids went along with stuff every not-quite-teenager of the time liked until they were 12 or more. (Though they did have a lot of exposure to classical music.) And then, all bets were off. They liked well-known bands of the time, mid 90s, that many other people liked - and they also liked Ray Charles and a lot of jazz singers as well as popular singers and bands of the 40s, 50s and 60s. Deeply weird listening experience for those unfamiliar with their eclectic tastes.

    For those of us 65 and over? We've basically ignored popular music of the last decade or so - since the kids left home. My dislike of certain kinds of classical music - 19th century sloppy romanticism, especially piano - has mellowed a bit. I very much doubt that people over 60 have such strong swings in music tastes as they might have done when they were younger. Though, come to think of it, my mother gets very miffed about those groups who claim to entertain groups of older people, but who play or sing stuff like Roll Out The Barrels and WW1 or earlier type songs. "Those are for people of my mother's generation. Why can't we have some Sinatra or Peggy Lee or the music we enjoyed with our kids - like The Beatles!?" Whereas I recall that she happily joined in with singalong type events when that sort of music was involved when I was a kid.
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    When I was in my early twenties, I made a long drive in extremely cold and potentially dangerous conditions. The only cassette in the vehicle was Fleetwood Mac's Rumors and I listened to that for about seven or eight hours as there was also no radio reception until a short distance from my destination.

    I could not stand to listen to any of the songs on that tape again for at least two decades, lol. My mind had associated that music with the stressful situation of the long drive and it brought out negative emotions whenever encountered after that.

    It was -50F when I started out on that journey and the inside of the cab was so cold that I needed mitts and hat on even though the heater was properly functional. As soon as the outside temperature reached -40F, many hours into the trip, the inside of the cab got downright balmy and I could shed the mitts and hat.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Weterman View Post
    5 years ago, certain songs sounded the best. Now, they don't sound as good. Why is this? It sucks, cause if I over listen a song I really like, I won;t like it anymore. Why does this happen?
    Unfortunately, music is also an industry. It's a business that can target specific age groups and pepper them with tunes designed for them. It's practically a science, psychology 101. You've only moved into the next generation of songs. Justin Bieber sounds horrible to me but to some bubblegum chewing 11 year old girl he's Elvis.
    All that belongs to human understanding, in this deep ignorance and obscurity, is to be skeptical, or at least cautious; and not to admit of any hypothesis, whatsoever; much less, of any which is supported by no appearance of probability...Hume
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    Quote Originally Posted by zinjanthropos View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Weterman View Post
    5 years ago, certain songs sounded the best. Now, they don't sound as good. Why is this? It sucks, cause if I over listen a song I really like, I won;t like it anymore. Why does this happen?
    Unfortunately, music is also an industry. It's a business that can target specific age groups and pepper them with tunes designed for them. It's practically a science, psychology 101. You've only moved into the next generation of songs. Justin Bieber sounds horrible to me but to some bubblegum chewing 11 year old girl he's Elvis.
    hmm, i dont agree with that. making a song is difficult. you dont just make a song as you make toys. if it sounds good, you make it. would be pretty hard to target a song at certain people. i believe all people, of any age, have a chance to like any song.
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    Meh. Mine have expanded more-so than actually changed. When I was young, I was into music from the 60s-70s (The Beatles, Rolling Stones, Queen, etc). Now, I listen to 1950s-1970s, as well as acoustic guitar instrumentals from any time period, music of the Classical era ( Schubert, Beethoven) Romantic (Chopin, Wagner, Brahms, Tchaikovsky) and Rachmaninoff Annnnnnd Bach from the Baroque. Still, I adore a good Queen album at times.
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    I think every song I have ever liked and sang, I still like and sing. Music and performing it to me is an expression of art.

    I never grow tired of them.
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  14. #13  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Weterman View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by zinjanthropos View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Weterman View Post
    5 years ago, certain songs sounded the best. Now, they don't sound as good. Why is this? It sucks, cause if I over listen a song I really like, I won;t like it anymore. Why does this happen?
    Unfortunately, music is also an industry. It's a business that can target specific age groups and pepper them with tunes designed for them. It's practically a science, psychology 101. You've only moved into the next generation of songs. Justin Bieber sounds horrible to me but to some bubblegum chewing 11 year old girl he's Elvis.
    hmm, i dont agree with that. making a song is difficult. you dont just make a song as you make toys. if it sounds good, you make it. would be pretty hard to target a song at certain people. i believe all people, of any age, have a chance to like any song.
    Sure everybody has a chance to like something or everything. Songwriting isn't difficult for those who have that talent. Demographics (Fan Base), Marketing & Promotion. Here's one guy of many who knows a little about marketing music. Target audience is a big part of the music we hear. If you like the Doodlebops then you're probably a kid.
    All that belongs to human understanding, in this deep ignorance and obscurity, is to be skeptical, or at least cautious; and not to admit of any hypothesis, whatsoever; much less, of any which is supported by no appearance of probability...Hume
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    5 years ago, certain songs sounded the best. Now, they don't sound as good. Why is this? It sucks, cause if I over listen a song I really like, I won;t like it anymore. Why does this happen?
    Then just don't listen to those songs as much. Doing anything over and over becomes disliked by everyone most of the time.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Weterman View Post
    hmm, i dont agree with that. making a song is difficult. you dont just make a song as you make toys. if it sounds good, you make it. would be pretty hard to target a song at certain people. i believe all people, of any age, have a chance to like any song.
    Well.. making real music is difficult indeed. However, most of the pop music production nowadays is like a children's drawing compared to the masterpieces of geniuses like da Vinci or van Gogh. Nevertheless, children love to draw. and music industry likes to produce stuff that is being listened to by the widest range of people. And the key is in simplicity... You cannot give anything complicated, anything which requires some thinking/introspection processes to the masses... Masses want easy and non difficult entertainment.. they don't want real art...
    and you can target a song on a specific group of people... you can use melodies, which resemble something to them (modern folk music for elderly) or use lyrics which they can relate to...

    and again.. easiest of all is to target music on great masses... just don't give them anything complicated... two chords... non-demanding lyrics... melody from 5 tones... and you are the master musician today... or rather... master seller?

    Anyway.. lots of great music are still being made on independent scenes. Have a look at Glen Hansard & Marketa Irglova for example... and even some commercial stuff is sometimes worth listening
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    Quote Originally Posted by Weterman View Post
    5 years ago, certain songs sounded the best. Now, they don't sound as good. Why is this? It sucks, cause if I over listen a song I really like, I won;t like it anymore. Why does this happen?
    As for this... I'd think it's because since brain pays more attention to new things than to well-known things, your brain just stop paying extra-attention to the song it knows even backwards. And suddenly.. it's just an ordinary song
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  18. #17  
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    Quote Originally Posted by cosmictraveler View Post
    5 years ago, certain songs sounded the best. Now, they don't sound as good. Why is this? It sucks, cause if I over listen a song I really like, I won;t like it anymore. Why does this happen?
    Then just don't listen to those songs as much. Doing anything over and over becomes disliked by everyone most of the time.
    Stole this from brainy quotes:
    All that belongs to human understanding, in this deep ignorance and obscurity, is to be skeptical, or at least cautious; and not to admit of any hypothesis, whatsoever; much less, of any which is supported by no appearance of probability...Hume
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  19. #18  
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    Your tastes evolve over time. As a kid, I used to like McDonald's and Taco Bell and I no longer do. Granted, taste can change due to biological reasons, but perhaps there is something along that line in regards to auditory senses as well.
    "Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." -Calvin
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  20. #19  
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    Quote Originally Posted by rickettsie View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Weterman View Post
    hmm, i dont agree with that. making a song is difficult. you dont just make a song as you make toys. if it sounds good, you make it. would be pretty hard to target a song at certain people. i believe all people, of any age, have a chance to like any song.
    Well.. making real music is difficult indeed. However, most of the pop music production nowadays is like a children's drawing compared to the masterpieces of geniuses like da Vinci or van Gogh. Nevertheless, children love to draw. and music industry likes to produce stuff that is being listened to by the widest range of people. And the key is in simplicity... You cannot give anything complicated, anything which requires some thinking/introspection processes to the masses... Masses want easy and non difficult entertainment.. they don't want real art...
    and you can target a song on a specific group of people... you can use melodies, which resemble something to them (modern folk music for elderly) or use lyrics which they can relate to...

    and again.. easiest of all is to target music on great masses... just don't give them anything complicated... two chords... non-demanding lyrics... melody from 5 tones... and you are the master musician today... or rather... master seller?

    Anyway.. lots of great music are still being made on independent scenes. Have a look at Glen Hansard & Marketa Irglova for example... and even some commercial stuff is sometimes worth listening
    its not right to call music not real, just because you dont like it. a person cant just write a song anytime they want. their mind needs to be in the right state, they have to be in the right mood.
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  21. #20  
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    Quote Originally Posted by zinjanthropos View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by cosmictraveler View Post
    5 years ago, certain songs sounded the best. Now, they don't sound as good. Why is this? It sucks, cause if I over listen a song I really like, I won;t like it anymore. Why does this happen?
    Then just don't listen to those songs as much. Doing anything over and over becomes disliked by everyone most of the time.
    Stole this from brainy quotes:
    lol
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  22. #21  
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    I think writing a song, even for a songwriter is horribly difficult. As a perfectionist...I am so critical of EVERYTHING I do in my craft. I had a director once tell me that I beat myself up, but that I always deliver more than they expect.

    I want the audience to LOVE the song, and feel it. I want them to hear and get the humor and laugh, and I want them to get the poignancy and the emotions and feel the tears. ALL of it is important to me!

    I do not feel a songwriter puts out a song just put one out. I would hope not. Not if he/she did not have the passion for what they wrote.
    Last edited by babe; January 26th, 2014 at 02:58 AM.
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    I think we like music that has some mixture of familiarity and surprise. After we've heard it often enough, there aren't any surprises left, so it's less interesting.

    Tastes also change as we get older. Young children usually like a simple, sing-song style, but then as we get older we appreciate more atonality. We like to spice it up by throwing in some surprising notes here and there.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Weterman View Post
    It's not right to call music not real, just because you don't like it. A person can't just write a song anytime they want. Their mind needs to be in the right state, they have to be in the right mood.
    well.. ethic codex might vary between people (apropos, lots of people deny existence of things they don't like )

    I completely understand that person can't write a song every time he wants... but what was the point?
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    To be fair, I've listened to Down on the Corner about a million times and I still turn the volume up when it comes on.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370 View Post
    I think we like music that has some mixture of familiarity and surprise. After we've heard it often enough, there aren't any surprises left, so it's less interesting.

    Tastes also change as we get older. Young children usually like a simple, sing-song style, but then as we get older we appreciate more atonality. We like to spice it up by throwing in some surprising notes here and there.
    I have performed the same song 100 times and never find any less joy or passion in delivering it. IMHO good music doesn't feel repetitive.....
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    That's a good question. Its kind of like stretching, you do a certain stretch and it feels really good, like some tension gets released. Then you do it again, and less gets released. Maybe its like excercising paths in our brain or something.
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    I think that this antipathy experienced by the brain is the same as that experienced by other pleasurable experiences.

    Simply stated, we become desensitized to the substance, or in this case, the music, through over exposure. We are a species that ever seeks new experience even though we find a degree of comfort in things which are familiar. As our range of experience broadens, the competition for attention by our brain becomes that much greater and our favorites are naturally going to evolve over time.

    Some songs and experiences remain more entrenched if they are reinforced by strong emotional attachment such as milestones in our life.
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    Quote Originally Posted by scheherazade View Post
    I think that this antipathy experienced by the brain is the same as that experienced by other pleasurable experiences.

    Simply stated, we become desensitized to the substance, or in this case, the music, through over exposure. We are a species that ever seeks new experience even though we find a degree of comfort in things which are familiar. As our range of experience broadens, the competition for attention by our brain becomes that much greater and our favorites are naturally going to evolve over time.

    Some songs and experiences remain more entrenched if they are reinforced by strong emotional attachment such as milestones in our life.

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