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Thread: IQ and being genius.

  1. #1 IQ and being genius. 
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    At what IQ level are you considered gifted? At what IQ level are you considered genius?


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    Average 85 - 115
    Above average 115 - 125
    Gifted 125 - 135
    Highly gifted 135 - 145
    Genius 145 - 155
    Genius 156 - 165
    High genius 166 - 180
    Highest genius 181 - 200
    IQ chart


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    Quote Originally Posted by mmatt9876 View Post
    At what IQ level are you considered gifted?
    When you are able to answer that question, you are considered gifted.

    At what IQ level are you considered genius?[/QUOTE]
    When you are able to answer that question, you are considered to be a genius.

    Seriously though, there is no official 'gifted' or 'genius' level of IQ.
    Different people choose different levels and give them names like 'Severely mentally disabled' or 'Superior' or 'borderline' or 'genius'.

    And, IMO, IQ is not a good way to measure genius anyway.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dywyddyr View Post
    Average 85 - 115
    Above average 115 - 125
    Gifted 125 - 135
    Highly gifted 135 - 145
    Genius 145 - 155
    Genius 156 - 165
    High genius 166 - 180
    Highest genius 181 - 200


    IQ chart
    thesmartbaby.com?
    Is that peer reviewed?

    Here's some others: IQ classification - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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    It really depends. I think my local school system defines "gifted" as more than two standard deviations above the mean, and "extraordinarily gifted" as more than three standard deviations above the mean.

    "Genius", though... I think that's very subjective, and personally I tend to see it as being more correlated to accomplishment than IQ. I have known some highly gifted people who are, ah, "accomplishment challenged", and some very highly accomplished people whose IQ's were tested at around 120. One of my favorite physicists will very happily tell you that he's "barely above average".

    Interestingly, there's significant evidence that people are more likely to be highly accomplished if their IQs are somewhere between @ 120 and 140... above average, but not extraordinarily so.

    I wonder if "genius" is what happens when someone who is highly intellectually gifted is able to apply their intellectual gift toward their accomplishments.

    Just musing.
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    I had a Mensa IQ test done when I was around 11 or 12 or so. I got quite a good result for my IQ score. I'm now 32 and I'd dread to see how much it's shrunk!
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedPanda View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by mmatt9876 View Post
    At what IQ level are you considered gifted?
    When you are able to answer that question, you are considered gifted.

    At what IQ level are you considered genius?
    When you are able to answer that question, you are considered to be a genius.

    Seriously though, there is no official 'gifted' or 'genius' level of IQ.
    Different people choose different levels and give them names like 'Severely mentally disabled' or 'Superior' or 'borderline' or 'genius'.

    And, IMO, IQ is not a good way to measure genius anyway.[/QUOTE]Richard Feynman comes to mind. IQ is a great way to measure intelligence in the specific medium the test is designed for "spatial", whether spatial skills constitute genius? Probably, however, I've read studies on the correlation between nobel prize winners and their IQ scores... oddly the correlation was fairly weak after 125+.
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    Quote Originally Posted by shlunka View Post
    And, IMO, IQ is not a good way to measure genius anyway.
    Richard Feynman comes to mind. IQ is a great way to measure intelligence in the specific medium the test is designed for "spatial", whether spatial skills constitute genius? Probably, however, I've read studies on the correlation between nobel prize winners and their IQ scores... oddly the correlation was fairly weak after 125+.[/QUOTE]

    I'd doubt that for the science prizes, which is only about half of them.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by shlunka View Post
    And, IMO, IQ is not a good way to measure genius anyway.
    Richard Feynman comes to mind. IQ is a great way to measure intelligence in the specific medium the test is designed for "spatial", whether spatial skills constitute genius? Probably, however, I've read studies on the correlation between nobel prize winners and their IQ scores... oddly the correlation was fairly weak after 125+.
    I'd doubt that for the science prizes, which is only about half of them.[/QUOTE]Indeed, however, does it not take some sort of "genius" or at least highly above average abilities to achieve a nobel prize in any area? Even the peace prize would require a strong grasp on emotional control/attachment/public speaking/etc.
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    Average 85 - 115
    Above average 115 - 125
    Gifted 125 - 135
    Highly gifted 135 - 145
    Genius 145 - 155
    Genius 156 - 165
    High genius 166 - 180
    Highest genius 181 - 200
    That chart is only relative, and some people consider the scales differently, duck. There is no absolute definition of "genius".
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    IQ is a horrible measure of intelligence. Jacob Barnett is a 14-year-old arrogant know-it-all who thinks he can disprove relativity (look up his interview with Glenn Bleck on YouTube, "12 year old disproves relativity" or something like that). His IQ? 170... Richard Feynmann's? 125. Albert Einstien's? 160. Leonard Da Vinci's? 190. I know Mozart had an IQ around 190, but I can bet he would have a hard time understanding a lot of Einstein's work. Akrit Jaswal was a child prodigy and performed his first surgery when he was seven, and his IQ was "only" 146. I wouldn't trust any seven-year-old to do surgery on me, especially if I must base it off of IQ.
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    Quote Originally Posted by anticorncob28 View Post
    IQ is a horrible measure of intelligence. Jacob Barnett is a 14-year-old arrogant know-it-all who thinks he can disprove relativity (look up his interview with Glenn Bleck on YouTube, "12 year old disproves relativity" or something like that). His IQ? 170... Richard Feynmann's? 125. Albert Einstien's? 160. Leonard Da Vinci's? 190. I know Mozart had an IQ around 190, but I can bet he would have a hard time understanding a lot of Einstein's work. Akrit Jaswal was a child prodigy and performed his first surgery when he was seven, and his IQ was "only" 146. I wouldn't trust any seven-year-old to do surgery on me, especially if I must base it off of IQ.
    All of the IQ's of any individual living prior to the invention of the Stanford-Bennet IQ test "circa 1930s?" are nothing but speculative suppositions. Mozart may have had an IQ of 190, but that's based on nothing but his childhood proclivity to create music and prowess later in life. Personally... I find Bach, Beethoven, Brahm, and several others to be more enjoyable to listen to. Barnett's IQ is also likely a speculation, especially considering that during childhood years your IQ will be HIGHLY dependent on your exposure to reading/math. The seven year old doing surgery...meh... I've tested in that range, and I would feel uncomfortable setting someone's ankle at 17. Einstein's is also a speculative guess, usually at 160 since the accuracy past that point diminishes quickly. By basing "genius" solely on IQ you rule out savants and various forms of autism as well. I would agree with you on Barnett if he actually stated that he could "disprove relativity", my understanding of math is very limited, but I'm fairly certain that he could only expand upon relativity, as it's not something one can disprove? I also disagree that IQ isn't a great measure of intelligence, it's splendid for measuring fluid intelligence.
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    All of the IQ's of any individual living prior to the invention of the Stanford-Bennet IQ test "circa 1930s?" are nothing but speculative suppositions. Mozart may have had an IQ of 190, but that's based on nothing but his childhood proclivity to create music and prowess later in life. Personally... I find Bach, Beethoven, Brahm, and several others to be more enjoyable to listen to. Barnett's IQ is also likely a speculation, especially considering that during childhood years your IQ will be HIGHLY dependent on your exposure to reading/math. The seven year old doing surgery...meh... I've tested in that range, and I would feel uncomfortable setting someone's ankle at 17. Einstein's is also a speculative guess, usually at 160 since the accuracy past that point diminishes quickly. By basing "genius" solely on IQ you rule out savants and various forms of autism as well. I would agree with you on Barnett if he actually stated that he could "disprove relativity", my understanding of math is very limited, but I'm fairly certain that he could only expand upon relativity, as it's not something one can disprove? I also disagree that IQ isn't a great measure of intelligence, it's splendid for measuring fluid intelligence.
    So if IQ is a good measure of intelligence, what does it tell you exactly? Oh and about Barnett, I believe he is also working to disprove the big bang. People who know physics and have watched his videos tell me that the kid doesn't know what he is talking about. For instance he uses F = ma for light, completely wrong. They say he is working to get a PhD, yet the stuff he writes on the board when interviewing Glenn Beck is A levels at best. (don't forget to answer my question, if you choose to respond).
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    Quote Originally Posted by anticorncob28 View Post
    All of the IQ's of any individual living prior to the invention of the Stanford-Bennet IQ test "circa 1930s?" are nothing but speculative suppositions. Mozart may have had an IQ of 190, but that's based on nothing but his childhood proclivity to create music and prowess later in life. Personally... I find Bach, Beethoven, Brahm, and several others to be more enjoyable to listen to. Barnett's IQ is also likely a speculation, especially considering that during childhood years your IQ will be HIGHLY dependent on your exposure to reading/math. The seven year old doing surgery...meh... I've tested in that range, and I would feel uncomfortable setting someone's ankle at 17. Einstein's is also a speculative guess, usually at 160 since the accuracy past that point diminishes quickly. By basing "genius" solely on IQ you rule out savants and various forms of autism as well. I would agree with you on Barnett if he actually stated that he could "disprove relativity", my understanding of math is very limited, but I'm fairly certain that he could only expand upon relativity, as it's not something one can disprove? I also disagree that IQ isn't a great measure of intelligence, it's splendid for measuring fluid intelligence.
    So if IQ is a good measure of intelligence, what does it tell you exactly? Oh and about Barnett, I believe he is also working to disprove the big bang. People who know physics and have watched his videos tell me that the kid doesn't know what he is talking about. For instance he uses F = ma for light, completely wrong. They say he is working to get a PhD, yet the stuff he writes on the board when interviewing Glenn Beck is A levels at best. (don't forget to answer my question, if you choose to respond).
    It tells you how well a person can spatially picture/manipulate objects and patterns. I.E, how much a person can have going on in their head without forgetting. Think of it like mental math, but with patterns and objects. What this correlates to is fluid intelligence, which differs from crystallized intelligence "knowledge". Fluid intelligence is the ability to acquire new skills and whatnot. Put simply, an individual with an IQ of 160 will find it considerably easier to memorize and apply newly acquired knowledge than someone with, say, an IQ of 120.
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    It tells you how well a person can spatially picture/manipulate objects and patterns. I.E, how much a person can have going on in their head without forgetting. Think of it like mental math, but with patterns and objects. What this correlates to is fluid intelligence, which differs from crystallized intelligence "knowledge". Fluid intelligence is the ability to acquire new skills and whatnot. Put simply, an individual with an IQ of 160 will find it considerably easier to memorize and apply newly acquired knowledge than someone with, say, an IQ of 120.
    Very good explanation, thank you for this information.
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    I would add that IQ is not, and so far as I know, not related to, drive/ ambition/ application.
    Being as smart as f*ck isn't worth much if you're not going to do anything with those smarts.

    On the other hand hard work with "average" smarts can be worth something.
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    I think high IQ scores are mostly correlated to study. In an independent survey the top 10 percent of students taking the doctor entrance exams had used. Pre-exsisting study material and had the ideas fresh in their minds. Of that ten percent 6 percent had used expensive grinds teachers that few can afford. Of them some companys use IQ tests as a way of pretending to hire people with high scores while really hiring from either within the company itself or from somebodys family or friend
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    Wow!
    You can be incoherent on so many subjects... What a talent.
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    As a good skeptic, I must point out that IQ does not correlate with rationality. IQ is the ability to use the brain to manipulate data of various kinds. That does not mean the ability to recognise reality. I think of the biblical scholar who used the clues in the bible to calculate that the world was 6000 years old. I have no doubt that guy had a high IQ. But his ability to recognise reality was sadly defective.

    A lot of very high IQ people are known to believe things like astrology, weird religions, little grey men from outer space, Bigfoot and so on. IMHO, rationality is just as important as IQ, if not more so.
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    I think IQ tests just measure pattern recognition. Whether pattern recognition is indicative of overall intelligence is another matter.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daecon View Post
    I had a Mensa IQ test done when I was around 11 or 12 or so. I got quite a good result for my IQ score. I'm now 32 and I'd dread to see how much it's shrunk!
    You are 32 and thinking that...holy moses.....I am much older and don't even CONSIDER THAT

    yet

    ok when I forget where I left my phone, my keys or my....oops don't need those anymore!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dywyddyr View Post
    Average 85 - 115
    Above average 115 - 125
    Gifted 125 - 135
    Highly gifted 135 - 145
    Genius 145 - 155
    Genius 156 - 165
    High genius 166 - 180
    Highest genius 181 - 200

    IQ chart
    I am not an expert in this area, but I was always wondering - how can an IQ score automatically mean you are a genius ? By the above chart and by an IQ test I did back in college I would find myself in the "genius" upper half of this chart, however, I most definitely don't consider myself a genius by even the remotest stretch of the imagination, or else I wouldn't be here right now, but would be busy publishing revolutionary physics papers.

    Wouldn't it be more accurate to state that such scores reflect the potential to become something, rather than being something ?
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    IQ ranges and scores differ; and they're not very predictive. They're more about potential; someone with an IQ of 90 does not have the potential to understand nuclear physics at the highest level. Someone with around 130/140 IQ should be able to with work, and someone with 180+ should be able to master it quickly. But past about the 130/40 stage the IQ itself isn't that relevant; past there everyone 'can' do something, it's now about whether they have the motivation.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Markus Hanke View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Dywyddyr View Post
    Average 85 - 115
    Above average 115 - 125
    Gifted 125 - 135
    Highly gifted 135 - 145
    Genius 145 - 155
    Genius 156 - 165
    High genius 166 - 180
    Highest genius 181 - 200


    IQ chart
    I am not an expert in this area, but I was always wondering - how can an IQ score automatically mean you are a genius ? By the above chart and by an IQ test I did back in college I would find myself in the "genius" upper half of this chart, however, I most definitely don't consider myself a genius by even the remotest stretch of the imagination, or else I wouldn't be here right now, but would be busy publishing revolutionary physics papers.

    Wouldn't it be more accurate to state that such scores reflect the potential to become something, rather than being something ?
    I agree with that, it's potential. Unfortunately, the potential is often squandered by childhood/adolescent environment. Some find academic work to be menial and tedious... then they lose interest... then they achieve scores that are a travesty of their capabilities... then they don't get into a decent university and live the rest of their lives barely above mediocrity working some monotonous job in the service industry. I have no evidence asides from specific examples, but I would hazard to say that at a certain point, IQ may actually correlate with a LESS logical view on life. Bobby Fischer comes to mind... as does Kaczynski "He must've been a genius to know how to spell his damn name". Or in earlier times... Leupold and Loeb, Tesla was peculiar about certain areas of life "weight and dress", a few notable writers also could fall into the category.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Markus Hanke View Post
    I am not an expert in this area, but I was always wondering - how can an IQ score automatically mean you are a genius ?
    Uh, becaue there's two "definitions" of the word?
    1) He's really really smart.
    2) He's actually done something astounding.
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    To be considered a genius, one must produce something recognized as genius. But you only have to do it once in your life to be awarded the title.
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnDoe View Post
    IQ ranges and scores differ; and they're not very predictive. They're more about potential; someone with an IQ of 90 does not have the potential to understand nuclear physics at the highest level. Someone with around 130/140 IQ should be able to with work, and someone with 180+ should be able to master it quickly. But past about the 130/40 stage the IQ itself isn't that relevant; past there everyone 'can' do something, it's now about whether they have the motivation.
    Good answer; I tend to agree with this.
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    Quote Originally Posted by shlunka View Post
    I agree with that, it's potential. Unfortunately, the potential is often squandered by childhood/adolescent environment. Some find academic work to be menial and tedious... then they lose interest... then they achieve scores that are a travesty of their capabilities... then they don't get into a decent university and live the rest of their lives barely above mediocrity working some monotonous job in the service industry. I have no evidence asides from specific examples, but I would hazard to say that at a certain point, IQ may actually correlate with a LESS logical view on life.
    My IQ was measured to be 178 when I was around 11-12 years old, but coming from a poor family and going to a rubbish school where I was constantly bullied with no support from any of my family means I know all too well about squandered potential. It left me hating school so much I left at 16 as soon as I could and I spent the majority of my teenage years dumbing myself down so I could have any semblance of social life with the few friends I was able to make.
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnDoe View Post
    But past about the 130/40 stage the IQ itself isn't that relevant; past there everyone 'can' do something, it's now about whether they have the motivation.
    Most standard test don't do a good job reliable measuring above 135 (say 2 standard deviations, though the curve isn't normal) or so. Generally I'd like to agree with you, but there's a significant fraction of gifted/talented held back by other developmental problems that have nothing do with motivation. In fact this is one reason test for special education almost always include measuring IQ and comparing it to academic achievement. In younger ages, it can be as simple as poor eyesight or hearing to the various spectrum of other disorders such as ADHD, autism, depression and many others.
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    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Daecon View Post
    I had a Mensa IQ test done when I was around 11 or 12 or so. I got quite a good result for my IQ score. I'm now 32 and I'd dread to see how much it's shrunk!
    You are 32 and thinking that...holy moses.....I am much older and don't even CONSIDER THAT

    yet

    ok when I forget where I left my phone, my keys or my....oops don't need those anymore!
    Don't fret too hard; intelligence is not directly tied to age, but is directly tied to active learning, which is why it tends to peak during the college years and then go into decline. The more you use your thinker, the better it works.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nisslbody View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Daecon View Post
    I had a Mensa IQ test done when I was around 11 or 12 or so. I got quite a good result for my IQ score. I'm now 32 and I'd dread to see how much it's shrunk!
    You are 32 and thinking that...holy moses.....I am much older and don't even CONSIDER THAT

    yet

    ok when I forget where I left my phone, my keys or my....oops don't need those anymore!
    Don't fret too hard; intelligence is not directly tied to age, but is directly tied to active learning, which is why it tends to peak during the college years and then go into decline. The more you use your thinker, the better it works.
    In order to perform in theatre, or in music, one needs to constantly think and study. Memorizing lines is a good boon also!
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    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Nisslbody View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Daecon View Post
    I had a Mensa IQ test done when I was around 11 or 12 or so. I got quite a good result for my IQ score. I'm now 32 and I'd dread to see how much it's shrunk!
    You are 32 and thinking that...holy moses.....I am much older and don't even CONSIDER THAT

    yet

    ok when I forget where I left my phone, my keys or my....oops don't need those anymore!
    Don't fret too hard; intelligence is not directly tied to age, but is directly tied to active learning, which is why it tends to peak during the college years and then go into decline. The more you use your thinker, the better it works.
    In order to perform in theatre, or in music, one needs to constantly think and study. Memorizing lines is a good boon also!
    Here's to lifelong learning!
    babe likes this.
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  34. #33  
    Theatre Whore babe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nisslbody View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by nisslbody View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by daecon View Post
    i had a mensa iq test done when i was around 11 or 12 or so. I got quite a good result for my iq score. I'm now 32 and i'd dread to see how much it's shrunk!
    you are 32 and thinking that...holy moses.....i am much older and don't even consider that

    yet

    ok when i forget where i left my phone, my keys or my....oops don't need those anymore!
    don't fret too hard; intelligence is not directly tied to age, but is directly tied to active learning, which is why it tends to peak during the college years and then go into decline. The more you use your thinker, the better it works.
    in order to perform in theatre, or in music, one needs to constantly think and study. Memorizing lines is a good boon also!
    here's to lifelong learning!
    absolutely!
    Reply With Quote  
     

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