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  1. #201  
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    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    To alter a quote from "My Fair Lady", "BY GEORGE HE GOT IT!!!"
    No, she didn't.

    You dodged because you asserted that it was Your Belief.

    You have repeatedly and consistently promoted this belief on a Science Board - a place in which such claims must be questioned.
    Falling back to refusing to examine it because you've developed the belief based on assumptions on your part (Such as "he was perfectly healthy") is a clear fallacy.
    In order to not have dodged, you would have needed to provide evidence for your claim and assertions which is what you did not do, but instead, stated that it is your belief.

    I am not confronting it to inspire your ire. I am confronting it because you made the assertions. "I disagree with you lads- (Make assertion as if it is fact)"
    On a Science Forum, that cannot be ignored. It must be used to teach lurkers, readers, members and participants alike how fallacies weigh into assumed beliefs and what causes such beliefs to be justified in ones mind to strengthen the belief (such as deciding the belief must be true based on the assumption that the subject was "perfectly healthy" even though you were not in a position to know the full particulars of his health, etc.)
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  2. #202  
    Theatre Whore babe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neverfly View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    To alter a quote from "My Fair Lady", "BY GEORGE HE GOT IT!!!"
    No, she didn't.

    You dodged because you asserted that it was Your Belief.

    You have repeatedly and consistently promoted this belief on a Science Board - a place in which such claims must be questioned.
    Falling back to refusing to examine it because you've developed the belief based on assumptions on your part (Such as "he was perfectly healthy") is a clear fallacy.
    In order to not have dodged, you would have needed to provide evidence for your claim and assertions which is what you did not do, but instead, stated that it is your belief.

    I am not confronting it to inspire your ire. I am confronting it because you made the assertions. "I disagree with you lads- (Make assertion as if it is fact)"
    On a Science Forum, that cannot be ignored. It must be used to teach lurkers, readers, members and participants alike how fallacies weigh into assumed beliefs and what causes such beliefs to be justified in ones mind to strengthen the belief (such as deciding the belief must be true based on the assumption that the subject was "perfectly healthy" even though you were not in a position to know the full particulars of his health, etc.)
    Fine

    question them...but experience is also science...and reality is also science...and reality is he was in perfect health per his doctors....and then this...

    ok..you and I shall not agree.
    \
    I, however will not to the diss you diss me thing in here.

    HE wasn't sick

    He had a total physical

    He was healthy

    and then overnight this happened and YES that is literally true

    and he, who also was a scientist in his own field is dead.

    as for my language, *L*..well I won't apologize.

    I have maintained from day one who I am.
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  3. #203  
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    I stumbled across David Deangelo, read his book on dating ... its a good book to start with. Basically being cocky & funny is an attractive thing to women.
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    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    but experience is also science...
    Experience is not necessarily the scientific method. I can experience the idea that Homeopathy works- but I did not experience it in a scientifically moderated environment.
    I can experience a Magic Show by James Randi- that does not make Magic real.
    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    and reality is he was in perfect health per his doctors
    Instead of, "He was in perfect health" he was "In perfect health as claimed by doctors."

    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    I, however will not to the diss you diss me thing in here.
    I have not dissed you.

    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    HE wasn't sick
    There is now very strong evidence that he was.
    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    YES that is literally true
    No, it is how you perceived it based on incomplete information.

    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    as for my language, *L*..well I won't apologize.

    I have maintained from day one who I am.
    I think you've noticed that I've figured out WHO you are talking about by now and that you're fully aware that I did my best to be supportive of the agony you have had to bear over his loss. I did not realize it was your nephew, at first. And I think that is too recent for this.
    I find it tragic, that he has become a basis of debate. But this does not mean that how you feel on the topic should make it allowable to make unsupported declarations all over the forum. You need to confront your pain on it, with friends and family...
    I understand your frustration and anger with his doctors. But when on a Discussion Board about Science- claims Will and Must be Challenged.

    You have, too, the opportunity to learn from it as much as to teach others.
    I really hope that you are willing to do so.
    But apologies are not needed, unless you're asking one from me; Just let me know what it is for and chances are that I will be more than happy to apologize for any offense.
    Last edited by Neverfly; July 24th, 2013 at 05:18 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neverfly View Post
    Experience is not necessarily the scientific method.
    Sure ... that is why science never bother with experiment.

    I can experience the idea that Homeopathy works- but I did not experience it in a scientifically moderated environment.
    All Homeopathy that works, works. It work pretty much the same as placebo for the same reason. It is how science is done, measuring fact/experience.

    I can experience a Magic Show by James Randi- that does not make Magic real.
    The only magic here is the stupidity of this assertion. All those Magic Show are based on a big deal of work talent and technology, and every one of them is very real and working. If not you may ask for a refund.
    The way you transform experienced "Magic show" into "real Magic" is what is called fallacies, which you are not even good at making up.

    But this does not mean that how you feel on the topic should make it allowable to make unsupported declarations all over the forum.
    The day you hypocrite will do something else that what your are ludicrously claiming other people do is yet to come.

    But when on a Discussion Board about Science- claims Will and Must be Challenged.
    You have, too, the opportunity to learn from it as much as to teach others.
    I really hope that you are willing to do so
    Ho, mega giga tera sweat irony.
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    Boing3000, your constant nonsense and absolutely lame attempts to pick fights impress no one. Maybe someday, you'll get over it but in the meantime, you're a rather useless distraction that I will not bother with.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neverfly View Post
    Boing3000, your constant nonsense and absolutely lame attempts to pick fights impress no one. Maybe someday, you'll get over it but in the meantime, you're a rather useless distraction that I will not bother with.
    Ho, dodging again, aren't you ?
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  8. #208  
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    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    but experience is also science...
    To be more accurate, experience is observation. Experience is the act of gathering data. If you're not testing that data, you're not performing science.

    A monkey who sees termites in a nest is not performing science. The monkey who tests different apparatus for extracting those termites and ultimately discovers a saliva-covered piece of grass is the best tool has performed a scientific experiment (albeit a crude one).

    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    and reality is also science...
    I think you might be confused as to the definition of science. If you make sweeping general claims as to the nature of science, you might incur the wrath of more than Neverfly. You have to be careful with your terms around scientists. I, for one, can be very picky about terminology and how definitions are applied.
    "Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." -Calvin
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  9. #209  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope cosmictraveler's Avatar
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    I feel that it isn't that we should always be trying to "understand" women but rather should be trying to live in balance with them, giving and taking from time to time. By adapting to each other we can better find ways of adjusting to meet the needs and wants of them and they us.
    When the power of love overcomes the love of power the world will know peace.
    Jimi Hendrix
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  10. #210  
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    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    Fine

    question them...but experience is also science...and reality is also science...and reality is he was in perfect health per his doctors....and then this...

    ok..you and I shall not agree.
    \
    I, however will not to the diss you diss me thing in here.

    HE wasn't sick

    He had a total physical

    He was healthy

    and then overnight this happened and YES that is literally true

    and he, who also was a scientist in his own field is dead.

    as for my language, *L*..well I won't apologize.

    I have maintained from day one who I am.
    It may not have shown up in his physical.

    I understand from your post, that he was grieving for a loved one?

    The researchers estimated the relative risk of a heart attack by comparing the number of patients who had someone close to them die in the week before their heart attack to the number of deaths of significant people in their lives from one to six months before their heart attack.


    Psychological stress such as that caused by intense grief can increase heart rate, blood pressure and blood clotting, which can raise chances of a heart attack.


    At the beginning of the grieving process, people are more likely to experience less sleep, low appetite and higher cortisol levels, which can also increase heart attack risks.


    Elizabeth Mostofsky, lead author of the research, said grieving people also sometimes neglect regular medications, possibly leading to adverse heart events, She added: "Friends and family of bereaved people should provide close support to help prevent such incidents, especially near the beginning of the grieving process.


    "Similarly, medical professionals should be aware that the bereaved are at much higher risk for heart attacks than usual."

    You really can die of a broken heart say scientists - Telegraph

    The condition is called Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, also known as Broken Heart Syndrome. It isn't a permanent thing, but it is why people's heart's can stop after they have heard some bad news or they are in a period of extreme emotional stress (such as grieving the loss of a loved one). You can read more about it here: HowStuffWorks "Can you die of a broken heart?"

    Certainly, he may have been healthy before the death of the person he loved and adored. However that loss and the extreme grief (or heart ache) he would have suffered could quite literally have made him ill and affected his heart. And a physical would not have caught it. He would have needed to undergo an angiogram to diagnose it.
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  11. #211  
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikepotter84 View Post
    Do women make any logical decisions when it comes to dating usually or is it primarily emotion/desire based?

    I say this because when dealing with women, my rejections have been pretty much automatic. It is like women look at me, size me up and decide I'm not worth it in like 30 seconds and then no longer give me the time of day. It is also fairly automatic when they fall for someone else. I've noticed that they automatically giggle at the sight of tall, attractive men and hit on him. I know that there are a precious few women who don't behave this way but I have noticed this trend. Women tend to put off dating "the nice guy" until they are ready to settle...until then, he is ignored almost entirely. Even on dating sites I have tested my theory...I message perhaps 30 women with a witty comment and get not so much as a response (and their accounts are active accounts, I make sure of that)...eventually perhaps one or two out of 30 will respond...I can only surmise that they view my profile, make a snap judgement and choose to ignore me based on my appearance or height (5'4).

    I am a kind, intelligent person. I do not abuse women. I would do anything for my partner. Do most women even give a damn about that? Or do they choose mates primarily based upon an immediate emotional response triggered by appearance until and unless they decide to "settle"?
    Psychological ("personality") Types read this most women choose to "Feel and not think" However as we know from karen slaughgters non-fiction books love impairs the brain
    "The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error; but who does strive to do deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold souls who neither know victory nor defeat."
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  12. #212  
    Theatre Whore babe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tranquille View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    Fine

    question them...but experience is also science...and reality is also science...and reality is he was in perfect health per his doctors....and then this...

    ok..you and I shall not agree.
    \
    I, however will not to the diss you diss me thing in here.

    HE wasn't sick

    He had a total physical

    He was healthy

    and then overnight this happened and YES that is literally true

    and he, who also was a scientist in his own field is dead.

    as for my language, *L*..well I won't apologize.

    I have maintained from day one who I am.
    It may not have shown up in his physical.

    I understand from your post, that he was grieving for a loved one?

    The researchers estimated the relative risk of a heart attack by comparing the number of patients who had someone close to them die in the week before their heart attack to the number of deaths of significant people in their lives from one to six months before their heart attack.


    Psychological stress such as that caused by intense grief can increase heart rate, blood pressure and blood clotting, which can raise chances of a heart attack.


    At the beginning of the grieving process, people are more likely to experience less sleep, low appetite and higher cortisol levels, which can also increase heart attack risks.


    Elizabeth Mostofsky, lead author of the research, said grieving people also sometimes neglect regular medications, possibly leading to adverse heart events, She added: "Friends and family of bereaved people should provide close support to help prevent such incidents, especially near the beginning of the grieving process.


    "Similarly, medical professionals should be aware that the bereaved are at much higher risk for heart attacks than usual."

    You really can die of a broken heart say scientists - Telegraph

    The condition is called Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, also known as Broken Heart Syndrome. It isn't a permanent thing, but it is why people's heart's can stop after they have heard some bad news or they are in a period of extreme emotional stress (such as grieving the loss of a loved one). You can read more about it here: HowStuffWorks "Can you die of a broken heart?"

    Certainly, he may have been healthy before the death of the person he loved and adored. However that loss and the extreme grief (or heart ache) he would have suffered could quite literally have made him ill and affected his heart. And a physical would not have caught it. He would have needed to undergo an angiogram to diagnose it.
    I believe you can die of a broken heart. I have seen it happen twice. I think they just give up. SO I guess, scientifically, what? They willed themselves to die?
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  13. #213  
    has lost interest seagypsy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Tranquille View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    Fine

    question them...but experience is also science...and reality is also science...and reality is he was in perfect health per his doctors....and then this...

    ok..you and I shall not agree.
    \
    I, however will not to the diss you diss me thing in here.

    HE wasn't sick

    He had a total physical

    He was healthy

    and then overnight this happened and YES that is literally true

    and he, who also was a scientist in his own field is dead.

    as for my language, *L*..well I won't apologize.

    I have maintained from day one who I am.
    It may not have shown up in his physical.

    I understand from your post, that he was grieving for a loved one?

    The researchers estimated the relative risk of a heart attack by comparing the number of patients who had someone close to them die in the week before their heart attack to the number of deaths of significant people in their lives from one to six months before their heart attack.


    Psychological stress such as that caused by intense grief can increase heart rate, blood pressure and blood clotting, which can raise chances of a heart attack.


    At the beginning of the grieving process, people are more likely to experience less sleep, low appetite and higher cortisol levels, which can also increase heart attack risks.


    Elizabeth Mostofsky, lead author of the research, said grieving people also sometimes neglect regular medications, possibly leading to adverse heart events, She added: "Friends and family of bereaved people should provide close support to help prevent such incidents, especially near the beginning of the grieving process.


    "Similarly, medical professionals should be aware that the bereaved are at much higher risk for heart attacks than usual."

    You really can die of a broken heart say scientists - Telegraph

    The condition is called Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, also known as Broken Heart Syndrome. It isn't a permanent thing, but it is why people's heart's can stop after they have heard some bad news or they are in a period of extreme emotional stress (such as grieving the loss of a loved one). You can read more about it here: HowStuffWorks "Can you die of a broken heart?"

    Certainly, he may have been healthy before the death of the person he loved and adored. However that loss and the extreme grief (or heart ache) he would have suffered could quite literally have made him ill and affected his heart. And a physical would not have caught it. He would have needed to undergo an angiogram to diagnose it.
    I believe you can die of a broken heart. I have seen it happen twice. I think they just give up. SO I guess, scientifically, what? They willed themselves to die?
    You can actually will yourself to die. Depression can cause abnormal levels of brain chemicals necessary to keep vital organs functioning normally. And as adalady already pointed out, being depressed can cause a person to lose the will to live and therefore lose the drive to do the things necessary to maintain survival, such as hygiene, hydration, food.

    I once was so depressed I started showing signs of hepatitis but had no traces of the virus in my system. My liver and kidneys were shutting down. I was jaundiced and my eyes were very puffy, even my eyeballs were yellow and turned to a very mushy state. I could not pass hardly any waste and when I did what should have been light in color was dark and what should have been dark was extremely pale.

    My body was shutting down.

    Then suddenly I decided I wanted to live, I don't know why i changed my mind I just did. and all my symptoms started to fade. It may be that i decided to drop out of school and figured that may be a better solution to my problems than just dying. But I actively wanted to die before the symptoms began.

    It's called psychosomatic illness.

    Even now I can nearly stop my own heart if I am left alone long enough that my concentration doesn't get broken. Your organs do what your brain tell them to do. They only function so long as your brain is telling them to. If you become so depressed that the chemicals in the brain stop the signals from the brain to the heart telling it to beat, then you will die. And it would appear to be death by broken heart. but there is certainly science involved. One's inability or lack of awareness of the science behind such things is not prove that science is not involved or that science cannot explain something. Belief that science can't explain something is nothing more than faith and possibly a subconscious hope and desire that there is something more to life than just a series of chemical reactions. But whether we like it or not, chemical reactions are pretty much all anything is, including life.
    Speaking badly about people after they are gone and jumping on the bash the band wagon must do very well for a low self-esteem.
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  14. #214  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Babe
    I believe you can die of a broken heart. I have seen it happen twice. I think they just give up. SO I guess, scientifically, what? They willed themselves to die?
    Did you have a look at the links provided?

    It's not that they will themselves to death.

    The typical presentation of someone with takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a sudden onset of congestive heart failure associated with ECG changes suggestive of an anterior wall myocardial infarction. During the course of evaluation of the patient, a bulging out of the left ventricular apex with a hypercontractile base of the left ventricle is often noted. It is the hallmark bulging out of the apex of the heart with preserved function of the base that earned the syndrome its name "tako tsubo", or octopus pot in Japan, where it was first described.[5]



    Evaluation of individuals with takotsubo cardiomyopathy typically includes a coronary angiogram, which will not reveal any significant blockages that would cause the left ventricular dysfunction. Provided that the individual survives their initial presentation, the left ventricular function improves within 2 months. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is more commonly seen in post-menopausal women.[6] Often there is a history of a recent severe emotional or physical stress.[6]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Takotsubo_cardiomyopathy
    Japanese doctors first identified broken heart syndrome among five patients in the early 1990s. That cluster stood out among the 415 other heart attack victims they examined, since the five patients appeared to have no blocked arteries, the usual source of such incidences, and they recovered more quickly and easily than the rest of the study population [source: Dote et al]. Upon closer inspection, the Japanese physicians noticed the hearts' left ventricles had ballooned, resembling a takotsubo, or pot used for catching octopi [source: Derrick]. That swelling exerted additional pressure on the heart, which explained the temporary heart attack-like symptoms. In 2005, two additional studies on takotsubo cardiomyopathy linked these types of faux heart attacks to extreme emotional states of grief, anxiety and stress, which helped earn the condition its Shakespearean nickname.

    Although parting ways with a romantic partner isn't necessarily a precursor for broken heart syndrome, extreme stress can aggravate the heart. In response to stress, the body releases catecholamines, or hormones produced in the adrenal glands that prompt our self-protective "fight or flight" reaction. Doctors suspect that a flood of epinephrine and norepinephrine (aka adrenaline and noradrenaline) briefly disable the heart's muscular cells and slow its pumping functions down to crawl, similar to a heart attack [source: Winslow]. Once the condition is correctly diagnosed, patients generally recover -- sometimes with the assistance of aspirin and other mild medications to regulate blood circulation -- in roughly a week [source: HealthDay].

    HowStuffWorks "Love Hurts, Literally"
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  15. #215  
    Theatre Whore babe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tranquille View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Babe
    I believe you can die of a broken heart. I have seen it happen twice. I think they just give up. SO I guess, scientifically, what? They willed themselves to die?
    Did you have a look at the links provided?

    It's not that they will themselves to death.

    The typical presentation of someone with takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a sudden onset of congestive heart failure associated with ECG changes suggestive of an anterior wall myocardial infarction. During the course of evaluation of the patient, a bulging out of the left ventricular apex with a hypercontractile base of the left ventricle is often noted. It is the hallmark bulging out of the apex of the heart with preserved function of the base that earned the syndrome its name "tako tsubo", or octopus pot in Japan, where it was first described.[5]



    Evaluation of individuals with takotsubo cardiomyopathy typically includes a coronary angiogram, which will not reveal any significant blockages that would cause the left ventricular dysfunction. Provided that the individual survives their initial presentation, the left ventricular function improves within 2 months. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is more commonly seen in post-menopausal women.[6] Often there is a history of a recent severe emotional or physical stress.[6]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Takotsubo_cardiomyopathy
    Japanese doctors first identified broken heart syndrome among five patients in the early 1990s. That cluster stood out among the 415 other heart attack victims they examined, since the five patients appeared to have no blocked arteries, the usual source of such incidences, and they recovered more quickly and easily than the rest of the study population [source: Dote et al]. Upon closer inspection, the Japanese physicians noticed the hearts' left ventricles had ballooned, resembling a takotsubo, or pot used for catching octopi [source: Derrick]. That swelling exerted additional pressure on the heart, which explained the temporary heart attack-like symptoms. In 2005, two additional studies on takotsubo cardiomyopathy linked these types of faux heart attacks to extreme emotional states of grief, anxiety and stress, which helped earn the condition its Shakespearean nickname.

    Although parting ways with a romantic partner isn't necessarily a precursor for broken heart syndrome, extreme stress can aggravate the heart. In response to stress, the body releases catecholamines, or hormones produced in the adrenal glands that prompt our self-protective "fight or flight" reaction. Doctors suspect that a flood of epinephrine and norepinephrine (aka adrenaline and noradrenaline) briefly disable the heart's muscular cells and slow its pumping functions down to crawl, similar to a heart attack [source: Winslow]. Once the condition is correctly diagnosed, patients generally recover -- sometimes with the assistance of aspirin and other mild medications to regulate blood circulation -- in roughly a week [source: HealthDay].

    HowStuffWorks "Love Hurts, Literally"
    Yes, thank you.
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  16. #216  
    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AmazingUniverse View Post
    My response was not written figuratively, it was to be taken literally. The statement is not a metaphor at all. A metaphor is a "figure of speech in which a word or phrase is applied to an object or action to which it is not literally applicable."
    ...
    The word "energy" in the sentence, "energy flows where attention goes", is tantamount to "Spirit" or "Desire" or "Attitude". You can substitute either of these words in place of the word "energy".. "Your spirit flows where your attention goes." "Desire flows where attention goes." "Attitude flows where attention goes."
    You are suing the word "energy" (something that exists and is well defined) as a substitute for some vague concept (that probably doesn't have any physical existence)? Sounds like a metaphor to me.
    Without wishing to overstate my case, everything in the observable universe definitely has its origins in Northamptonshire -- Alan Moore
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    Quote Originally Posted by Strange View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by AmazingUniverse View Post
    My response was not written figuratively, it was to be taken literally. The statement is not a metaphor at all. A metaphor is a "figure of speech in which a word or phrase is applied to an object or action to which it is not literally applicable."
    ...
    The word "energy" in the sentence, "energy flows where attention goes", is tantamount to "Spirit" or "Desire" or "Attitude". You can substitute either of these words in place of the word "energy".. "Your spirit flows where your attention goes." "Desire flows where attention goes." "Attitude flows where attention goes."
    You are suing the word "energy" (something that exists and is well defined) as a substitute for some vague concept (that probably doesn't have any physical existence)? Sounds like a metaphor to me.
    And to me, having to explain, on and "understanding" thread, what energy means very literally to 99% of people, seems like a waste of energy.
    Oh that word again ? But why have I the guts to use that "well defined" word reserve to physicist that will bicker about it endlessly for centuries ?
    Maybe you would acknowledge what a Nobel Prize winner has to say on the mater ?
    It is important to realize that in physics today, we have no knowledge of what energy “is.”
    Sounds like a literal sentence to me.
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  18. #218  
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    Quote Originally Posted by scheherazade View Post
    This thread has certainly 'grown legs' overnight for a fact, lol. My simple solution is to set the 'reset' button by posting the core question from the OP.

    Do women make any logical decisions when it comes to dating usually or is it primarily emotion/desire based?
    There are actually two question contained therein.

    1. Do women make any logical decisions when it comes to dating?

    2. Is it primarily emotion/desire based?

    As I see it, the questions can be answered by women from a primary point of view or by men as a secondary perspective because men are the subject of the decision being made.

    The questions may be answered from first hand experience or from the shared experience of others or even simply as an observer.

    These questions may be answered differently by women who prefer to date within their own gender as I hypothesize that they may be seeking somewhat different personality traits in their partner and the biological question of having children is not a given although there are several avenues to address same for women including donated sperm or adoption.

    Selecting any portion of this post has the potential to get the thread back on track.

    What appears to make all the difference is ego.

    Egotistical people have "abuser" written on their foreheads. If you think you deserve her, or that she's slighting you if she refuses, then you're egotistical.

    Most women don't want to be abused. They don't care if it's a handsome man doing it. They'd just rather avoid it. I would say that's a highly logical approach to things.

    Online dating: I try to make my first letter rather humble. Asking her if she feels like spending the time to talk with me. (Essentially, anyway. I word it differently to be sure.) If she responds then I do my best to keep the conversation interesting. The more interesting the conversation is, the more likely she'll want to have a very long conversation (which would require meeting in person.). If she likes the long conversation, then she might like a very very long conversation (which would require living in the same house/apartment for days on end.)

    I suspect that that one factor may be the only one women seriously weigh into their decision sometimes.
    Some clocks are only right twice a day, but they are still right when they are right.
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  19. #219  
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    If anyone is seriously interested in how women, and men, make "decisions" about who they are and aren't attracted to the ABC's science program did a whole half hour segment on this last week. Catalyst: The Chemistry of Attraction - ABC TV Science
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
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  20. #220  
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    Quote Originally Posted by adelady View Post
    If anyone is seriously interested in how women, and men, make "decisions" about who they are and aren't attracted to the ABC's science program did a whole half hour segment on this last week. Catalyst: The Chemistry of Attraction - ABC TV Science
    It refused to open for me!

    Thanks though.
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  21. #221  
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    Quote Originally Posted by scheherazade View Post
    This thread has certainly 'grown legs' overnight for a fact, lol. My simple solution is to set the 'reset' button by posting the core question from the OP.

    Do women make any logical decisions when it comes to dating usually or is it primarily emotion/desire based?
    There are actually two question contained therein.

    1. Do women make any logical decisions when it comes to dating?

    2. Is it primarily emotion/desire based?

    As I see it, the questions can be answered by women from a primary point of view or by men as a secondary perspective because men are the subject of the decision being made.

    The questions may be answered from first hand experience or from the shared experience of others or even simply as an observer.

    These questions may be answered differently by women who prefer to date within their own gender as I hypothesize that they may be seeking somewhat different personality traits in their partner and the biological question of having children is not a given although there are several avenues to address same for women including donated sperm or adoption.

    Selecting any portion of this post has the potential to get the thread back on track.
    1. Absolutely. I dated men who, had a great smile, could converse and had both a sense of humor and brains. I married a VERY analytical man, who is so freaking smart it isn't funny. I think he married me for comic relief, and because I am a good cook.

    2. All relationships have an element of emotion and desire. I mean if you don't desire your mate, how in the hell are you going to have sex with them? I have known women who married men for reasons other than emotion. I just can't imagine doing it!
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  22. #222  
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    Oh rats. I presume it's got some kind of location / othermystery restriction on it. Normally the ABC is OK but random is as random does.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
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  23. #223  
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    but adelady, don't you think that if there is a thread about "Understanding Women" that a similar thread of "Understanding Men" doesn't deserve equal space?
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    "Equal space"?

    But it's not an equally difficult problem.
    Some clocks are only right twice a day, but they are still right when they are right.
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  25. #225  
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    Quote Originally Posted by kojax View Post
    "Equal space"?

    But it's not an equally difficult problem.
    That rather reminds me of this skit about men and women by Bill Cosby...

    babe likes this.
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  26. #226  
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    Quote Originally Posted by kojax View Post
    "Equal space"?

    But it's not an equally difficult problem.
    HA!
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