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Thread: "Person-centered approach" as opposed to?

  1. #1 "Person-centered approach" as opposed to? 
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    Hello

    I don't know much about psychology and was wondering what the difference is between Carl Roger's "person-centered approach" and other approaches of psychotherapy such as CBT or psychoanalysis.

    I find the theory as explained on Wikipedia a bit vacuous, eg.
    All individuals (organisms) exist in a continually changing world of experience (phenomenal field) of which they are the center.


    Thank you.


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  3. #2  
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    He's better known as the proponent of "unconditional positive regard".

    I don't really know much about this as a therapeutic approach, but non-therapists like some educational theorists have made a right dog's breakfast of the idea in classrooms.


    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
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  4. #3  
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    Thanks for the info.

    "unconditional positive regard" meaning that other approaches (Freudian psychoanalysis?) that came before Rogers took a negative approach?
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    I'm not a fan of Freud so I'm probably the wrong person to answer. But there were plenty of 'therapeutic' approaches in those days which amounted to 'pull yourself together' and similarly unhelpful challenges and blaming people for their own failure to get better.

    And Freud's approach certainly encouraged people to spend a lot of time thinking about negative events in their lives while the therapist maintained a strictly objective, otherwise known as unsupportive, silence. So shifting the balance to more positive interaction wasn't an altogether bad idea.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
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  6. #5  
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    Makes sense. It's interesting, though, that we didn't/don't take it as a given back then that a psychotherapist should be benevolent and empathic. Spare the rod and spoild the child, I guess.
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  7. #6  
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    Serendipity rules!

    Last night I saw a documentary on neuroplasticity. Fan.tas.tic. Using the idea of neuroplasticity to come up with successful treatments for OCD, PTSD, paralysis and aphasia in stroke victims and a very promising protocol for making schizophrenia more manageable.

    The stunning one for me was the PTSD approach. It took a mere 6 weeks of one hour sessions to treat people successfully to the point where they no longer met the criteria for a PTSD diagnosis. When you think of all the military medical personnel dealing with traumatised veterans, and of rape counselling, victims of crime, police and other emergency personnel, train drivers, trauma from accidents and natural disasters and all of those centres in various countries handling refugees who are victims of torture or children who witnessed unspeakable horrors in their home countries - this could turn out to be a wonderful thing.

    Can't be too over enthusiastic. These people all had a single horrible event that ruined their lives. The program didn't say anything about how they might develop the protocol for dealing with victims of repeated child abuse, domestic violence or combat style problems. (And I suppose the technique might wear a bit thin when a train driver has to work through a third suicide in a short period.) Though my generation had grand/parents from the world wars and Vietnam vets to live with. Many of those blokes had one single worst-ever experience that seemed to be the focus of their fears, nightmares and obsessions. Just getting rid of the effects of that one event could make their lives easier if not eliminate the whole problem.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
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