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Thread: Two-Dimensional representation of Three-Dimensional cubes, and the corresponding perceptions.

  1. #1 Two-Dimensional representation of Three-Dimensional cubes, and the corresponding perceptions. 
    Forum Ph.D. stander-j's Avatar
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    Perspective of cube.jpg

    You know those adverts you see online where they ask things like, "Which way is the girl spinning? Clockwise, Counter-Clockwise, Both ways"? Well this thread is more-or-less related to that whole idea of perception. We will call the left cube 'A', and the right cube 'B'. We will call the third, missing, cube C. I'm curious as to how people perceive two-dimensional representations of three-dimensional cubes, or rectangles, and so on. Like, in the attached ms paint .doc, you can there are two ways to perceive your position in relationship to the cube:

    *The red lines with the dot at their point of intersection (the 'centre') is intended to signify the centre of the closest face relative to your position.

    A) Somewhat above the 'centre' of the closest face, and somewhat towards the 'right' of the closest face.

    -Note that for Cube 'B', we are operating under standard procedures for displaying North, West, South, and East.

    B) Very high above the the closest face, and somewhat Southwest of the closest face's 'centre'.

    Note: I am aware there is a third way to perceive your position in relationship to a cube that is represented two-dimensionally, we don't need the third cube though - the diagram is only here so you can understand what I'm trying to say.

    So, my question is this: If you were to look at a diagram of a two-dimensional representation of a three-dimensional cube, without any cues, from what perspective do you perceive the cube? I understand you are all capable of perceiving the cube in all three ways - but I'm asking how do you tend to perceive a cube when you have no cues. Please name your perspective with their assigned 'names': 'A' for the left cube, 'B' for the right cube, and 'C' for the cube not shown in the diagram.

    I will add this is only out of interest to see what the most common way to perceive it is.


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    Forum Ph.D. stander-j's Avatar
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    .. Three-Dimensional Cubes, I know.


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