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Thread: Reoccurring dreams, (from a psychological view)

  1. #1 Reoccurring dreams, (from a psychological view) 
    Teb
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    I am not a strong proponent of the dream analysis. So if we consider dreams to be a mere static of our brain trying to find a pattern in random thoughts or as a result of processing new experiences, how can reoccurring dreams fit into that theory.

    I have dreams that over a period of more then 10 years have reoccured several times identical every time they happen. These dreams do not portray a place or persons i know in real life.

    Also since my personal life changed over the course of these years one would assume there shouldn't be a trigger for these dreams to reoccur.


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  3. #2 Re: Reoccurring dreams, (from a psychological view) 
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    Quote Originally Posted by Teb
    I am not a strong proponent of the dream analysis. So if we consider dreams to be a mere static of our brain trying to find a pattern in random thoughts or as a result of processing new experiences, how can reoccurring dreams fit into that theory.

    I have dreams that over a period of more then 10 years have reoccured several times identical every time they happen. These dreams do not portray a place or persons i know in real life.

    Also since my personal life changed over the course of these years one would assume there shouldn't be a trigger for these dreams to reoccur.
    One may want to consider that a recurring experience could have several triggers; e.g., one might experience frequent headaches that could have multiple triggers both physiological and psychological. However, with recurring dreams the trigger is likely to be psychological because dreaming is an experience entirely of and within the mind. With recurring dreams, we are discussing a recurring effect that could have multiple psychological causes.

    To some who doubt the psychological relevance or the analytical value of dreams, recurring dreams provide the strongest evidence for both. To suggest that such dreams--with the exact same imagery at each occurrence--are products of our brain's efforts "to find a pattern in random thoughts" defies probability and is inconsistent with the nature of random experience; i.e., if the thoughts are random, shouldn't the dreams they produce be equally random? What this suggests is that recurring dreams convey something psychologically specific and, if that is true, what they convey has analytical value. Further still, if certain dreams convey something psychologically specific and have analytical value, shouldn't they all? Shouldn't non-recurring dreams have some relevance and value?

    In discussion elsewhere, I wrote: "Admittedly, there are many in science who dismiss the study of dreams and dreaming as eccentric, fringe, and without any substantive value. Some of the perceptions expressed in this discussion line (e.g., illogical, psychosis, and hallucinations) are likely the basis for this dismissal and for good cause. As I have commented, the incongruity or nonconformity of dream experience to real experience convincingly creates the perception of irrationality; however, that is just a perception.

    When we wake from dreaming or hear dreams retold, we often say they are illogical and don't make sense likely because we interpret our experience of dreams from the perspective of what is real physically and materially. However, dreams are not real physical/material experiences. The logic we apply to physical/material reality should not logically apply to an experience that is not truly physical or material. Why, emphatically, is that so difficult for so many to comprehend? Therefore, logically, our next step should be to determine what kind of experience dreams are and apply the logic of that experience to our perspective of what dreams may convey. The science and the entirety of human experience tell us what dream experiences are and the logic of that experience is what we should apply."


    Dreams are mental experiences and should be understood from that perspective. Your recurring dreams likely suggest something psychologically specific relative to recurring psychological influences or pressures in your life. Although your life has changed over the years, it is likely that you will encounter social influences and pressures you may have experienced in previous year--this is like the pressure of completing a college project that is now very much like the pressure of completing a career or work project. I hope this helps.


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  4. #3 Re: Reoccurring dreams, (from a psychological view) 
    Time Lord
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    Quote Originally Posted by Teb
    These dreams do not portray a place or persons i know in real life.
    That explains it - well, from a neurological point of view. Because the particulars constituting the dream have gone untouched by later experiences or associations, they recur exactly the same way. It must be an effectively "dead" cluster your usual thoughts (and dreams) are only remotely connected with.

    I dunno, I guess all minds have some clumps of useless information that rarely see the light of day (or night).
    A pong by any other name is still a pong. -williampinn
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  5. #4 Re: Reoccurring dreams, (from a psychological view) 
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pong
    I dunno, I guess all minds have some clumps of useless information that rarely see the light of day (or night).
    Several members routinely access this information and post it at The Science Forum.
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  6. #5  
    Time Lord
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    That's just a recurring dream you have. And it's sporatic, not routine.
    A pong by any other name is still a pong. -williampinn
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  7. #6  
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    Much more like a recurring nightmare when it involves this subject
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  8. #7  
    Time Lord
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    Heh, well the brain has no "delete" function. And that's just why the irrelevent associations we don't revist & reevaluate, recur in dreams like they were yesterday.
    A pong by any other name is still a pong. -williampinn
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