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Thread: Why memories dull?

  1. #1 Why memories dull? 
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    Quick note- I donít consider psychology a real science (oops i said it)

    Physics rule the universe, and all human behavior can be explained by biochemistry.

    ok so thatís out of the way.

    why do we get bored of something we had so much joy in?

    for example, a song that once made us jump with ecstasy now produces virtually no hormones.

    why? neural pathways too reinforced?

    excuse my ignorance in the subject, i cant truly fathom a logic explanation.


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    Veracity Vigilante inow's Avatar
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    Evolution has selected for those who find interest in exploring and learning new things, as this aids in adaptability in changing environments and conditions. Those who felt content by focusing on the same thing over and over again tended to do less well when that thing was no longer around or when circumstances changed. It's the classic generalist versus specialist phenomenon. Those that found interest in new things after learning about the previous tended to learn more and be more adaptable in changing environments.

    Now, I'd be glad to explain the psychology and neuroscience underlying this, but since you so eloquently rejected them as "not real science," I'm sure you don't care and would rather remain ignorant.


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    Forum Junior TheDr.Spo's Avatar
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    I agree with inow. The brain loves novelty. The song that you once enjoyed so much, was exposed to you too much. Thus, you became desensitized. The brain wants something else, and it knows exactly what to expect from your favorite. However, the feeling may come back if you leave the song and then listen to it again much later, thus allowing sensitivity to return and stimulating your brain again.

    P.S.: Mathematics out-ranks Physics.
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  5. #4  
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheDr.Spo
    I agree with inow. The brain loves novelty. The song that you once enjoyed so much, was exposed to you too much. Thus, you became desensitized. The brain wants something else, and it knows exactly what to expect from your favorite. However, the feeling may come back if you leave the song and then listen to it again much later, thus allowing sensitivity to return and stimulating your brain again.

    P.S.: Mathematics out-ranks Physics.
    In a nutshell: the brain basically operates by negative, not positive, feedback..?

    Inow, I'm pretty sure thx1139 rates neurology "real".

    I'm wondering if we might succinctly fit the "negative feedback brain" with the basic nature of neurons (they disperse signals). Because the model of neurons competing for stimulation, would have them teaming up in loops or even self-stimulating.
    A pong by any other name is still a pong. -williampinn
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pong
    In a nutshell: the brain basically operates by negative, not positive, feedback..?
    I don't know what this means.


    Quote Originally Posted by Pong
    I'm wondering if we might succinctly fit the "negative feedback brain" with the basic nature of neurons (they disperse signals).
    I would propose that synaptic connections and dendritic patterns (the structure of the ever changing neural web... connecting new... pruning old...etc.) are more important than are the neurochemicals released from cells themselves (in context of this discussion, anyway).


    Quote Originally Posted by Pong
    Because the model of neurons competing for stimulation, would have them teaming up in loops or even self-stimulating.
    I don't know what this means.
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  7. #6  
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    Quote Originally Posted by inow
    Quote Originally Posted by Pong
    In a nutshell: the brain basically operates by negative, not positive, feedback..?
    I don't know what this means.
    TheDr.Spo gave a nice example of negative feedback. The stimulated system (brain) responds in a way that does not increase the stimulation; rather, he says, it loves novelty. Thx1139 asked if this happens when neural pathways are "too reinforced".

    Quote Originally Posted by inow
    I would propose that synaptic connections and dendritic patterns (the structure of the ever changing neural web... connecting new... pruning old...etc.) are more important than are the neurochemicals released from cells themselves (in context of this discussion, anyway).
    I.e. cognitions are more important than moods? Agreed.

    Quote Originally Posted by inow
    Quote Originally Posted by Pong
    Because the model of neurons competing for stimulation, would have them teaming up in loops or even self-stimulating.
    I don't know what this means.
    Because neurons atrophy without stimulation (and grow when "fed" by other neurons), it is easy to imagine they're like individual organisms, each selfishly striving to acquire stimulation. Since one neuron can stimulate several, there must be a reason small groups don't just cluster and loop meaningless signals among themselves.
    A pong by any other name is still a pong. -williampinn
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  8. #7  
    Veracity Vigilante inow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pong
    TheDr.Spo gave a nice example of negative feedback. The stimulated system (brain) responds in a way that does not increase the stimulation; rather, he says, it loves novelty.
    I would not refer to that as negative feedback. As Dr.Spo himself called it, that's desensitization.


    Quote Originally Posted by Pong
    Quote Originally Posted by inow
    I would propose that synaptic connections and dendritic patterns (the structure of the ever changing neural web... connecting new... pruning old...etc.) are more important than are the neurochemicals released from cells themselves (in context of this discussion, anyway).
    I.e. cognitions are more important than moods? Agreed.
    No. What I meant is that the architecture of the nervous system (which is dynamic and constantly changing) is more important than the signaling methods (neurotransmitter release and absorption) for purposes of this discussion.



    Quote Originally Posted by Pong
    Because neurons atrophy without stimulation (and grow when "fed" by other neurons), it is easy to imagine they're like individual organisms, each selfishly striving to acquire stimulation. Since one neuron can stimulate several, there must be a reason small groups don't just cluster and loop meaningless signals among themselves.
    Thanks for clarifying. Yeah, that'd be bad. My guess is that those clusters and loops of meaningless signals actually have existed quite frequently in lifeforms, but have generally been selected against.
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  9. #8 Re: Why memories dull? 
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    Anyway, the question stands.

    The example
    a song that once made us jump with ecstasy now produces virtually no hormones
    ...couldn't be better. We know he's not asking why a rat stops eating when it feels full. He's asking why an internal reward loop (like humming your favorite song - or, my example: meditating on happy thoughts) why the brain eventually abandons these loops. Saying why, because we evolved that way, doesn't answer how.

    I have one idea, probably wrong: the internal loop does not actually "go away". Rather, because it is so self-rewarding, it consolidates into a discrete, autonomous package. I.e. that song in one's mind continues to loop. Because the loop now sustains itself without help from environment or the brain at large, we lose touch with it. That sounds bad, like all the choicest bits of cognition must keep peeling off so we can't access them. However because these structures just go over the same "thought" again and again, they'd have an infinite shelf life. Moreover, they'd be efficient little engines, if one could access them on occasion.
    A pong by any other name is still a pong. -williampinn
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    Forum Junior TheDr.Spo's Avatar
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    I have one idea, another why: Decrease in sensitivity to a reward combats the formation of extremely compulsive, repetitive behaviors. The reward needs to be dampened so that you wouldn't put that reward as your only priority, out-ranking appetite and other important priorities needed for survival.

    As a completely separate idea:

    I am no expert in this subject. So, someone correct me if I am wrong. This is simply a guess.

    Dopamine is commonly associated as the chief neurotransmitter of the reward system in the brain. The song you listen to produces a certain amount of dopamine release in a certain area every time you listen to it. The brain's feedback loops recognize the high concentrations of dopamine being released in that certain area or pathway for that song and make modifications to that area (my guess, via glial cells) in order to increase re-uptake of dopamine in that area or pathway. Thus, the dopamine release does not produce that "good" feeling anymore.

    Although, my reasoning sounds awfully close to mechanisms that work behind addiction and dependence, which means that you would then suffer withdrawal symptoms from not listening to the song. I don't believe that to be the case at all. "Boy, I really miss that good feeling from listening to that song. I need to listen to it MORE and get that happy feeling again!" It all sounds rather ridiculous to me.

    However, it's possible that the mechanism I described takes action, but you never cross the threshold of suffering withdrawal symptoms because of the fact that you can't increase the concentration of that stimulus, the song, like you would be able to with a drug. You can increase the duration by listening to it over and over, but this wouldn't cause the mechanism to keep increasing re-uptake past the threshold required to make you feel ill-effects when you stop.

    Conversely, abstinence would be noted by feedback loops resulting in re-uptake in the pathways for that song being decreased.

    Again, this is only my guess.
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  11. #10 Behavior and Psychology 
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    Greetings
    A regular yoga routine can promote healthy muscles, bones, and joints on many levels. Weight-bearing yoga poses can stimulate bone development, enhance both your strength and flexibility, and build stronger bones in your upper and lower body. Yoga also helps to balance your hormones, which limits bone loss. Finally, different yoga positions can improve your balance and coordination, helping to prevent falls.
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  12. #11  
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    We don't use the healthy foods and this is the reason and suffering from different dieting programs, this
    is the main reason that out memories going to be dull and more dull.
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  13. #12  
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    everything in life it will be dull for us if we do it always by the remember or Physical
    doing
    I have a mind
    I have to use it
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  14. #13  
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    I may be wrong, but dulling of memories could be part of our perception of time? If we remembered everything as if it was yesterday, I imagine that would cause problems when it came to trying to sort it in chronological order.
    One thing I know for certain is that dulling is a memory process where the 'vital' or 'life changing' memories are kept sharper and the non important memories are allowed to lapse somewhat, essentially keeping our brain 'clear' and ready for more information. That is why 'flashbulb' memories are burnt in our minds, because they contained something that heavily affected us.
    For example, I saw a horrible car crash a few years back, now every time I find myself driving too quickly, BAM, it pops up in my mind, almost as a reason to slow down.
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  15. #14  
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    memory is like the ram in computer when it was full it the performance will slow,same in human when are brain is full of memory it will dull,sometimes past memory will gone and some are still there.....
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