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View Poll Results: Art thou a teen?

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  • Yes!

    17 51.52%
  • No!

    13 39.39%
  • Undecided.

    3 9.09%
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Thread: Teenage Behavior

  1. #1 Teenage Behavior 
    Forum Freshman Deaths_Child's Avatar
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    Teenagers are confusing as the day is long. But is there some key some secret way of decoding them? Is it possible to get so inside the mind of a teen that you can understand their point of veiw?


    The more people I meet the more I like my dog.
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  3. #2  
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    Yes, inject yourself with hormones, a different amount and different types every 5 minutes and you will suddenly feel like a teenager again!


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  4. #3  
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    Well you must have been a teenager once yourself.
    Basically we like to drink and experiment with mind expanding drugs while having unprotected sex with many anonymous partners.

    But that's not all bad, I mean look at me. I turned out all right, and I only have a couple more teen years to go and I'm a goddam genius. RIght?
    - sploit -
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  5. #4  
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    im 15, and i personaly don't see me to be any different to any of my older adult friends(being people i know)

    to be honest, the hormons are a problem, but hey .. they're not all bad...

    don't try to get into our minds.....

    you want in ... would you like me to try to de-code your mind?
    trying to get into a teenager's mind is the exact same as trying to get into anyone else's.. it cannot be done!!!
    Stumble on through life.
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  6. #5  
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    I think the hormones affect different people in different ways. Not all teens have it so hard, but I did. I just remember feeling very depressed at moments and very manic at others. The only other time I ever felt like that after I was 17 was during pregnancy a few years later, so it convinced me that it was indeed hormones that were messing with my personality and not a 'brain chemical imbalance' or whatever the psychiatrists want you to think you have so that they can pump you full of antidepressants. The easiest target group to convince is teenagers, but what they should be doing is hormone therapy or making sure that teens excercise so that they can use their own neurotransmitters or endorphines to combat the hormone fluctuations.
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  7. #6  
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    Everyone grows up and figures out everything we once knew was kind of flawed. We then take bits and pieces of our knowledge and run it all through a sieve capturing the larger more useful bits. All the little stuff is forgotten and considered useless.

    Even tastes in music and movies can change as we grow up. Some things will stick around and become nostalgia, like 80's music

    Hormones do make some teens act a bit crazy at times, even irrational.

    I really love how as a kid you think some things are just sooo cool, only to grow up and realize you were just stupid Only the adults in the forum can relate to this. The teens will just take offense.
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  8. #7  
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    I believe it was Mark Twain who said, "When I was seventeen I could not believe how little my father knew. When I turned 21 I could not believe all he had learned in just 4 years."
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  9. #8  
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    I would suggest that a good starting point is to try and understand what the cause of the behavioural differences are before one judges the behaviour. From what I have read the development of humans continues until the early 20's. This means that some faculties are not fully developed until this time. One of these is the brain. The section that deals with social behaviour, read conformity, is not fully developed until early 20's, this is offered to explain the often thoughtless, selfish behaviour with less concern for the consequences that a mature adult might have.

    During the hormonal puberty rush there are also parts of the brain that get deprived so that resources can focus on developing sexual function. This means that in some instances intellectual function actually decreases during puberty. Long hours sleeping are required in order for the body to manage this significant transition, so the image of the lazy teenager has a biological cause.

    Add in the emotional turmoil of becoming sexually functioning beings with all the complex and often arbritrary social rules that musy be learnt. Competition and peer pressure are enormous at this point as they establish their status in the adult world and face a future of responsibility.

    Not suprisingly its a challenge, but all adults have been there before. The above is not intended to excuse or condone any antisocial behaviour by teenager, just some of the current ideas that science offers in this field.
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  10. #9 Re: Teenage Behavior 
    Forum Freshman Athelwulf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deaths_Child
    Teenagers are confusing as the day is long. But is there some key some secret way of decoding them? Is it possible to get so inside the mind of a teen that you can understand their point of veiw?
    I'll have to think about that question. I can tell my dad (and you, of course) the answer once I've thought about it enough. What I will say for now, is that you should treat teenagers like adult human beings, no matter what you may think of them.

    It works. I like people who treat me like an adult much more than people (like my dad) who treat me like I'm a child. I find that if someone treats me like an adult, I'm much more likely to act like their model of how an adult acts.
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  11. #10  
    Forum Sophomore vslayer's Avatar
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    yes, but then you have the problem that they still think you are a child. they dumb down words of which i can recite 3 meanings, and they speak with that antagonising condescending "you are jsut a little child and i kno better than you" tone.

    i prefer people who either treat me as an equal because they believe it, or just be as prejiduced to my age as they want.
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  12. #11  
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    The way to understand teenagers is to stop expecting them to be so vastly different. I mean, the mind works differently during the teen years (there was a very interesting thing about that on a documentary once, but I can't remember precisely what they said) but that doesn't mean it doesn't work as well or that it can't eventually come to the same (or, when not the same, equally valid) conclusions.
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  13. #12  
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    They don't know all the rules to the game yet. So they're playing by different rules. And the rules keep changing.

    So, I guess my answer is "no".

    Treat them like adults and expect them to act like children, because they are but they will.

    And never expect a good answer to, "Why did you do that?".
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  14. #13  
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    Quote Originally Posted by j
    Treat them like adults and expect them to act like children, because they are but they will.
    *lol* good suggestion. Much better than treating them like children and expecting them to act like adults, which is what a lot of people do.
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  15. #14  
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    And what a perfect recipe for disaster that is, isn't it?

    I didn't think of it when I posted, but that is exactly what parents do [let's not even talk about teachers ...].

    I just had a flashback to adolescence; the massive weight of inarticulate frustration ...

    shudder.

    And I still don't know why I did the things I did then.
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  16. #15  
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    I see lots of teenagers being treated like indignant little bastards, which most of them rightfully are. But I rarely receive treatment like that. Not that I mind or anything.
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  17. #16  
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  18. #17  
    Blah-blah blink. Ripley's Avatar
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    Teens -- and kids and the under-thirty-somethings -- all share one incredible feat: an unreal sense of immortality: that great chasm that separates the young from the 'adult': the fountain of youth: the broad panorama: a suspended future: a guaranteed second chance.
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  19. #18  
    Forum Freshman Communist Hamster's Avatar
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    Teenagers just don't have the experience yet. That and the hormones.

    Someone add a poll to this thread so we can vot if we are teenage or not.
    Up the workers!
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  20. #19  
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    Your friendly-neighbour-census-taker has arrived! Poll enacted.

    Personally, I don't find teenagers that much more irrational than people in their twenties, or any other age. Their behaviour is just somewhat more in... flux?

    Mr U
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  21. #20  
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    The administration has decided that this thread has swayed way off topic, so I have split this thread where it went off topic. All posts after HU's have been deleted. Please do not post anything in here that is not on topic.

    [Thread Split]

    Locke

    [EDIT BY HU: Any more posts concerning the subject of the partial deleting of this thread will be removed. If you have a problem, PM me.]
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  22. #21  
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    Well -- since my initial post remains, and since Beryl alluded to it, and since I was preparing a reply during the time that this thread was being vacuumed, I'll paste it as intended. BTW -- I agree with Invert_nexus: not all rivers flow steadily towards the sea; a straight line lacks dynamism, no?

    Anyhow.

    Quote Originally Posted by Beryl
    Quote Originally Posted by ad . hoc
    Teens -- and kids and the under-thirty-somethings -- all share one incredible feat: an unreal sense of immortality: that great chasm that separates the young from the 'adult'...
    feat, n?a noteworthy or extraordinary act or achievement, usually displaying boldness, skill, etc.: Arranging the treaty was a diplomatic feat.

    An incredible feat: an unreal sense of immortality...

    Granted -- the young are established perhaps innocently into a sense of everlasting existence by the sheer room they have to stretch their imaginative ambitions in. They are surrounded with the promise of endless possibilities. And without the annoyance of a diminishing outlook in all that is the future, the horizon of the young lie hazy and blissfully afar. They are well sheltered from limitations; well sheltered from impotency. There is no ruthless and suffocating disquietude that clings with the realisation that one's horizon, once a wide panoramic view, is shrinking fast and greying out. And if one chooses not to look at it, or is too busy to look, the body will rudely remind them of the fact. Imagine the emotional strain and the psychological stress of being in the vicinity of an approaching abyss -- with no turning back. La joie de vivre truly belongs to the young. And how well they act the part.

    Quote Originally Posted by Beryl
    You'll have to clean up your grammar a bit if you expect people to understand.
    Right. I haven't written stuff in ages, and I'm no writer. English is not my mother tongue. And I was depressed. So what?

    Quote Originally Posted by Beryl
    What I think you're saying is that young people don't realize that they can die, all things end, et cetera. I don't think that's even true of most teens/young adults, and it's certainly not true of all of us. I'm not exactly going to think death doesn't happen when I've just found out my best friend shot himself.
    Death as a concept, perhaps? As vengeance? As a romantic escape? As a convenience? Murder? However -- and the reason why I initially chose 'feat' and 'immortality' -- what if one does not wish to die?
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  23. #22  
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    I'm sixteen. I went through a very angst-ridden stage when I was fourteen. But ever since, my hormones seem to have (thankfully) stabilised.

    I think a lot of it is how society treats teenagers. Teenagers are expected to behave like children and adults at the same time. It gets confusing and frustrating for many of them.

    The media has a lot of control over teenagers. I find that angst seems to sell - for example, pseudo "punk" and "goth" are rampant amongst my age group (nevermind the fact that punk and goth are starkly different from the mainstream versions and are not angsty).
    "In the beginning the Universe was created. This has made a lot of people very angry and been widely regarded as a bad move." -- Douglas Adams
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  24. #23  
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    i am 15 and am amazed at how the meer presance of another person, particularly at school, can turn you from feeling ok to feeling as if you want to smash his head in... then you realise that the only reason you don't do it is because you'll get expelled and sent to a place surrounded by people a lot worse.

    but enough about the bastard at school...
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  25. #24  
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    Wallaby,

    start thinking about how that anger affects you though, if you haven't already. I'm not saying you are anything like me, but I didn't start seriously thinking about how detrimental my anger (and violence towards others, and animals), was to me until I was about 26. By then, the anger was so entrenched in me, that now, at 35, I am still working on finding a constructive way to deal with it. Anger can hurt you as much as it can anyone else. PM me if you have any questions or respond here if you want to.
    Death Beckons
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  26. #25  
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    i'm just lucky that i've been in control so far and havn't hit anyone.

    but enough about me...
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  27. #26  
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    Don't just be lucky. Make an informed decision about anger, now, while you are at the beginning of your life. Don't let it get entrenched without trying to understand it first. Save you, possibly, a lot of pain later.
    Death Beckons
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  28. #27 We have a teenager problem in England too. 
    New Member cormski's Avatar
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    Kid's these days, I don't know. When I was a child you'd get beaten black and blue if you showed the level of disrespect that seems second nature to the teenage cohort these days.

    I'm certain I don't remember being as much of a handful. The old headmaster used to whip me with a bamboo cane and it never did me any harm.

    I do remember frineds that received electric shock therapy, but am certain there there are more moderate approaches that are equally effective.

    A wide range of research has been undertaken on this - and early lifehood development and learning are key research challenges.
    "giving social science a voice" - www.esrcsocietytoday.ac.uk
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  29. #28  
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    Study and follow TV GUIDE as a major. Know that you're never going to be 30 and you're immortal.
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  30. #29  
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    haha Poof your funny.

    Yes I was recently a 'teen'. It is very interesting. I have always been very aware of things like staying off drugs and all that. I think because of the type of schooling I had. Only went to public school for the last two years of highschool and even then I was in college most of the time. I always thought those football players and cheerleaders were so lost. It is as though they weren't even conscious of their actions. They often seemed so dumb. In fact most people at the highschool I went to seemed pretty dumb and most of them smelled like drugs. I always thought they had it all wrong. Then something happend.

    While I still believe that many of them are wasting their time and being very stupid (following the cool as though they had no choice) I also realized that I was practicaly living unconsciously at that age. It is strange to look back on. My mind was suddenly freed from the chains that were holding it in place.

    Anyways, to sum up. I would say that most teenagers are in fact acting on unconsciuos impulse. If you don't believe me just wait a few more years.

    Yes they do seem to think they are invincible. The thing is we are all very strong. I am one who tries to see reason in everything. Teenage years are there to allow us to find our limits and to be able to mess up with very little troubles in recovery. As you get better there are less accidents.

    For example I do downhill and freestyle biking on occasion. I crashed a ton as a kid but, now I rarely do and I do things that would be considered more dangerous. Also, you learn how to take a fall when your young so that when you fall later in life it deals less damage. You also can (if you want) learn techniques for fast healing. Drugs are bad.:P

    Eh, these are just the opinions of a teen veteran.
    Do not try and bend the spoon. That's impossible. Instead... only realize the truth. There is no spoon. Then you'll see that it is not the spoon that bends, it is only yourself. -Spoon Boy
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